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7 Culinary Content Network Stories to Read Right Now

7 Culinary Content Network Stories to Read Right Now

Keeping you up to date in the world of great food and folk

Recipes, articles, reviews, and more from the Culinary Content Network.

If you’re not familiar with The Daily Meal’s Culinary Content Network, you should be. With everything from recipes and food-while-traveling tips to hosting ideas, guidelines for what and what not to drink, and restaurant reviews and recommendations, the Culinary Content Network has it all.

Click here to see 7 must-read stories!

New recipes, articles, and reviews are promoted daily and we're bringing them to you in a variety of ways. They're always shared on the homepage (below features), on each channel page (Eat, Drink, Cook, Travel, and Entertain), and are also delivered via our newsletters straight to your inbox.

This week we’re highlighting some of our favorites (although there are so many), that may not have reached you via our other efforts of promotion. We’ve got (to name a few) a Greek recipe for Pastitsio casserole with traditional Greek spices of cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice; the flavors of roasted vegetables, “nutty” quinoa, and “ooey-gooey” cheese in sweet potato quinoa lasagna; and "exceptional" chocolate chip cookies.

Click through to the slideshow to find out more!

Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal's assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.


7 of the best Malorie Blackman books to read now

With more than 60 books to her name, Blackman is known for exploring pertinent subjects in an accessible, engaging way, including race, class and the complexities of young love.

While her writing is aimed at young adult readers, her tight plots and beautifully drawn characters mean her books hold wide appeal for all.

So if you&rsquove never picked up a Malorie Blackman book, now is the time &ndash you won&rsquot regret it, promise. And if you&rsquore already a fan and fancy re-visiting Malorie Blackman&rsquos back catalogue, our list of favourites is a great place to start&hellip


Share All sharing options for: The Joy of Cooking Other People’s ‘Secret Family Recipes’

This past Christmas, my favorite gift came in the form of a hulking 1976 cookbook that contains all the flavors of my childhood. Titled Pots, Pans, and Pioneers, the book is a staple in many kitchens across Louisiana, containing the recipes for everything from five-cup salad to Depression chocolate pie alongside Creole favorites like crawfish étouffée and chicken and oyster gumbo.

Pots, Pans, and Pioneers is not a particularly well-known cookbook, at least outside of Louisiana: It’s actually a collection of recipes gathered by the Telephone Pioneers of America, Louisiana Chapter No. 24, and it is one of many incredible community cookbooks, painstakingly curated by families, churches, community groups, workplaces, and charities, that have functioned as the backbone of American home cooking for decades. In the era of glossy, chef-driven cookbooks that are arguably more beautiful than they are practical, it’s time for community cookbooks to finally get the recognition that they deserve.

Flipping through one of these cookbooks almost feels sneaky, like you’re peeking into someone’s grandma’s recipe box to find her most treasured culinary secrets. In the 1984 edition of Superlatives!, produced by the Junior League of Oklahoma City, you’ll find the recipe for Hattie’s Never-Fail Southern Fried Chicken. A name like that conveys a sense of place and permanence: Even though you’ve never met Ms. Hattie and don’t know what exactly it is that makes her chicken fail-proof, you can almost visualize an old Southern woman in her kitchen, cooking up a time-tested recipe.

These books are packed, beginning to end, with sacred family recipes. Passed down through the generations, the roots of these dishes often run deep. In Applehood and Mother Pie, a cookbook curated by the Junior League of Rochester, New York, you’ll find Grandmother’s Old Fashioned Boston Brown Bread, which is apparently a “great way to use up sour milk!” In Cooking With Love: Recipes Old and New, assembled by the First United Methodist Church in Prague, Oklahoma, there’s a recipe for Aunt Scrilda’s Toffee Squares that’s clearly been passed down as a family treasure.

Books like these are intensely personal by nature, packed with the recipes that everyday people believe are good enough to share with the world. These recipes aren’t tested by a chef in a professional kitchen over the course of a couple of months they’re honed over decades of Thanksgiving dinners and Thursday-night suppers with family crowded around the table. A lot of times, somebody’s “secret family recipe” for pumpkin pie is just the recipe off the back of the can of Libby’s pumpkin puree. But that often doesn’t matter, once recipes have been passed down, and when someone forever immortalizes their family’s most beloved recipe in their church’s cookbook, everyone who reads that book is better for it.

Sometimes, the most charming — or utilitarian — aspects of these books aren’t even the recipes. Maybe there are a few poems or funny stories written by the contributors. Often, they include several pages of straightforward cooking advice, clever and common ingredient substitutions, and measurement conversions. For many home cooks, knowing that three apples are roughly equivalent to a pound and that soaking cabbage in cold water will keep it crispy is infinitely more useful than knowing how to make a rose out of an avocado or produce restaurant-quality pasta.

The world of cookbooks is now hyper-specialized. It’s easy to go out and find a book written by your favorite chef, catering to the fad diet that you’re trying out this month, or introducing a cuisine you’d like to explore. But with community cookbooks, nobody’s trying to reinvent the wheel or show off their skills. So much history and authentic personality lies within these pages that the feeling of Grandma’s pride and joy is nearly palpable. It’s almost impossible to not get teary-eyed when you read a note like, “This chocolate cake was my late husband Arnold’s favorite. I hope you love it as much as he did.”

And sure, the way that Americans eat has changed pretty dramatically since these cookbooks were published in 1976 or 1983. Now we’re all trying to cut back on sodium and focus on “clean eating,” but that shouldn’t dissuade anyone from digging back into these old-school tomes. You may bristle at the ubiquity of condensed cream soups and Velveeta in ingredient lists, but there’s nothing stopping you from avoiding the chemical maelstrom and making your own cream of mushroom soup and processed cheese. Just don’t be surprised if it doesn’t quite taste the same.

Maybe times like these, when the world feels like it’s falling apart and there’s no end in sight to a literal pandemic, are when we should be leaning in to the idea of nostalgic comfort foods. We have been lied to about what is and is not healthy, and there’s no hard evidence that putting a can of mushroom soup in your casserole every once in a while is going to result in serious physical harm. Digging back into these old cookbooks is an opportunity to eschew the fatphobic, classist expectations that govern what is “good” and “bad” food and just eat the damn fake cheese.

It’s also not surprising that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, community cookbooks are making a comeback. As Priya Krishna reported for the New York Times in April, these cookbooks have taken on new life in the past few months, with community groups both virtual and in-person coming together to share recipes via shared Google Docs and instructional videos. Not surprisingly, many of these new collections focus on simple, comforting dishes that don’t require pricey cooking equipment or esoteric ingredients to make.

Obviously, given that these are informal cookbooks full of recipes written by amateur chefs, not everything works. But maybe that’s part of the charm, and it’s certainly part of cooking out of even the fanciest chef-written cookbooks. Who among us hasn’t been lied to about how long it will take a pot of onions to caramelize? How many times has a brave home cook followed every single direction in a complicated recipe meticulously, only to pull something completely inedible out of the oven?

Community cookbooks are not particularly difficult to find, especially on auction sites like eBay and the shelves of thrift stores. The best resource, though, may be the back of your mom’s (or grandma’s) kitchen cabinets, where it’s likely you’ll find a book or two that will evoke some nostalgia for the dishes you grew up on. If there were ever a time to recreate the tuna noodle casserole you begged for five nights a week as an elementary schooler, that time is now.


2. ‘The Sporkful’

Hosted by Dan Cashman, this pod bills itself as being not for foodies, but &ldquofor EATERS.&rdquo (Emphasis theirs.) Launched in 2010, this weekly James Beard and Webby Award&ndashwinning program uses humor and humanity to approach food from every angle&mdashscience, history, identity, economics and more. Expect conversations with guests like Marc Maron and Fortune Feimster about the best way to layer peanut butter and jelly in a sandwich and whether sparkling water is actually water.


7 African American Luxury & Lifestyle News Sites You Should Be Reading

From time to time, an industry or subject inspires us to create a best-of list. These African American news sites produce out-of-this-world coverage in a crowded arena. In case you’ve missed some, you can find them here. If you think your site should be considered, give us a holler and tell us why.

In 2015, Nielsen released a report on increasingly affluent and educated African American consumers, highlighting the underreported story of success in the black community. However, long before the Nielsen findings, media outlets were catering to African American consumers interested in enjoying luxury goods, travel, and fine dining and cuisine all while advancing their careers.

What better way to celebrate Black History Month than to highlight the top publications focusing on luxury, leisure, and business for African Americans who travel, dine, and deal.

1. Travel Noire

Travel Noire is the premier website for world travel from a black perspective. The site has a sleek modern aesthetic, beautiful imagery, and inspiring content.

Going beyond similar sites, Travel Noire includes essays on the personal experiences of black travelers and ex-pats to share a vision of limitless exploration of the world. The site also provides detailed coverage of destinations, food, entertainment, and travel gear and tech.

2. Atlanta Tribune

The Atlanta Tribune is a business-focused publication from the economic capital of Black America. It provides “relevant, thought-provoking news and information on business and generational wealth-building” to its audience of “powerbrokers, decision-makers, trendsetters and go-getters.”

Beyond business, the site offers coverage of technology, culture, and lifestyle mixed with local, regional, and national news.

3. Cuisine Noir

Cuisine Noir touts itself as “a culinary publication that complements readers’ lifestyles and desire for a diverse epicurean experience” as “the first magazine to feature the talents of black chefs across the country.” The online magazine focuses on food, wine, lifestyle, and travel.

The recipe section mixes favorites from across the African diaspora with trendy ingredients around the food world, and a special section profiles black-owned wineries, breweries, and distilleries around the world. There also are product and cookbook reviews, features with chefs and entrepreneurs, and coverage of travel and luxury stories.

4. AfroTech

AfroTech is part of the Blavity network and focuses on African Americans in tech industries. The site is the online home of “one of the largest multicultural tech conferences in the United States.” It aims to bring “leaders in technology and business together to exchange ideas and build a strong black tech community.”

The site supplies coverage of tech and business news alongside profiles of entrepreneurs and other inspiring stories.

5. Black Enterprise

Black Enterprise is the destination for entrepreneurship, wealth-building, and business news for African Americans. The magazine states its mission is to “educate and empower our audience to become full participants in wealth creation within the global economy.”

The site covers African American-focused business news from across all industries while paying special attention to technology and education.

6. Super.selected

Super.selected is a visually sophisticated digital fashion magazine “created by a fashion stylist […] with a fine art background.” The content includes fashion editorials featuring black models, as well as art and photography. There also is a database of black designers and shops.

While the focus is on fashion, the site also has coverage of music, entertainment, and celebrities, in addition to news and LGBT-interest topics. The World Travels section is particularly attractive with photo-essays, travelogues, and images from runways around the world.

7. Uptown

Uptown is an online magazine dedicated to luxury and lifestyle for African Americans. The site supplies ample coverage of entertainment and society news and arts and culture stories.

Readers also can find auto reviews, fashion and beauty spreads, destination profiles, and plenty of cocktail recipes.

Make sure to check out past lists from 2018 and 2019 covering even more top news sites for the black community.


All the Best & Most Shocking Celebrity Memoirs You Can Read Right Now

Tabloids, anonymous sources, and paparazzi aside, there’s only so much we can know about our favorite celebrities &mdash unless they decide to tell us more. After years (or decades) of having their stories told in the press, many celebs decide to set the story straight with a career-spanning memoir later on, reviewing highly-publicized incidents from their point of view and sharing intimate details only they could have known. So, no matter how much celebrity gossip you keep up on, memoirs are where the true secrets are revealed , and stars like Jessica Simpson, Demi Moore, and more have all made our jaws drop with their revelations in recent years.

To say that these celeb memoirs have rocked our world would be an understatement. From detailing sexual abuse or childhood abuse to opening up about struggles with addiction , rehab, or volatile relationships, these celebrities dug really, really deep, and even explained why they felt compelled to come forward. In short, most celebrities keenly remember a period of time in their lives when they felt lost, confused, and isolated &mdash and they hope that, by speaking out about their own experiences, they can be a symbol of hope and solidarity to those struggling now.

It’s unimaginably brave for these celebrities to have shared all they did, and we’re so grateful they took the time to put it all down on paper. Read on for a complete list of celebrity memoirs that showed us a whole new side to Hollywood, fame, and growing up in the spotlight.

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you&rsquoll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale.

A version of this article was originally published in August 2020.


For the kids

"Tomorrow I'll Be Kind" by Jessica Hische

"Tomorrow I'll Be Kind" by Jessica Hische

"Tomorrow I'll Be Kind" by Jessica Hische $12.79 at Amazon

"Tomorrow I'll Be Kind" by Jessica Hische $12.79 at Walmart

"Really cool illustrations, the kids seem to really be drawn to it," noted Coben of this kid-friendly pick. "Wonderful life lesson without beating you over the head. And really, who can't be told enough right now to be kind and show some tenderness?"


Cook to Connect

Good morning. Concentration is hard to come by these days, amid the nation’s strife. We are living through a tough and chaotic and wrenching time, filled with fury and an abiding sadness. We’re unsettled. We’re tense. We’re divided. The emotions arrange themselves in combinations that make it hard to work, to read, to watch, to listen, much less to think.

Cooking can help. The act of preparing food is a deliberate and caring one, even if you’re just making yourself a bowl of oatmeal at the end of a long night of worry. The way you sprinkle raisins over the top is an intentional act of kindness to yourself. So what I’m doing now, amid my restless skimming of nonfiction and news, thrillers and literature, poems that don’t bring solace: I read recipes, think about who in my family they might please, and I cook.

It might be something simple — the omelet that Ferran Adrià makes using only eggs, butter and potato chips. Or something more complex, like Melissa Clark’s new recipe for a spicy grilled salmon salad with lime, chiles and herbs (above).

Yewande Komolafe’s recipe for ginger-cauliflower soup would bring a smile to one of my children, as would, for another, Clare de Boer’s recipe for grilled chicken skewers with tarragon and yogurt. (Works great under the broiler if you don’t have a grill.)

Here’s Samantha Seneviratne with a fresh strawberry pie, and Colu Henry with linguine and clam sauce, and Kim Severson with the congrí she learned to make from Yolanda Horruitiner during a reporting trip to Cuba. One of those may bring you comfort, or provide a point of connection for you with someone else, or with the wider world.

But it’s worth pointing out, you don’t always need a recipe, to cook and cook well and make others pleased. Sometimes the muse just arrives and that’s that. The other night, there was a big bag of plain tortilla chips in the back of the pantry, and I had some ground beef and cheese, a can of beans, some lettuce and limes, some sour cream and hot sauce. A small smile came upon me then, unbidden. I sautéed the beef, cooked the beans with onions and garlic, cumin and orange juice, melted the cheese with cream, heated the chips. Nachos spark joy.

Thousands and thousands of actual recipes are waiting for you on NYT Cooking. (I love these sweet potatoes with tahini butter, from Samin Nosrat.) A lot more of them than usual are free to use even if you aren’t yet a subscriber to our site and apps. (But I’ll ask you anyway: Would you think about subscribing? Your subscription allows our work to continue.)

And if something goes wrong along the way, either with your cooking or our technology, please get in touch: [email protected] We will get back to you.

Now, it won’t make you happy nor teach you to cook, but it’s still an important read: Michael Pollan on America’s broken food system, in The New York Review of Books.

For Outside, Carrie Battan visited Serenbe, a wellness community south of Atlanta, and it’s a surreal thing to read right now, like a dispatch from another time.

Finally, here’s Latria Graham in Garden & Gun, “A Dream Uprooted,” an essay about her fight to save her family’s farm. I’ll return on Friday.


All the Best & Most Shocking Celebrity Memoirs You Can Read Right Now

Tabloids, anonymous sources, and paparazzi aside, there’s only so much we can know about our favorite celebrities &mdash unless they decide to tell us more. After years (or decades) of having their stories told in the press, many celebs decide to set the story straight with a career-spanning memoir later on, reviewing highly-publicized incidents from their point of view and sharing intimate details only they could have known. So, no matter how much celebrity gossip you keep up on, memoirs are where the true secrets are revealed , and stars like Jessica Simpson, Demi Moore, and more have all made our jaws drop with their revelations in recent years.

To say that these celeb memoirs have rocked our world would be an understatement. From detailing sexual abuse or childhood abuse to opening up about struggles with addiction , rehab, or volatile relationships, these celebrities dug really, really deep, and even explained why they felt compelled to come forward. In short, most celebrities keenly remember a period of time in their lives when they felt lost, confused, and isolated &mdash and they hope that, by speaking out about their own experiences, they can be a symbol of hope and solidarity to those struggling now.

It’s unimaginably brave for these celebrities to have shared all they did, and we’re so grateful they took the time to put it all down on paper. Read on for a complete list of celebrity memoirs that showed us a whole new side to Hollywood, fame, and growing up in the spotlight.

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you&rsquoll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale.

A version of this article was originally published in August 2020.


All the Best & Most Shocking Celebrity Memoirs You Can Read Right Now

Tabloids, anonymous sources, and paparazzi aside, there’s only so much we can know about our favorite celebrities &mdash unless they decide to tell us more. After years (or decades) of having their stories told in the press, many celebs decide to set the story straight with a career-spanning memoir later on, reviewing highly-publicized incidents from their point of view and sharing intimate details only they could have known. So, no matter how much celebrity gossip you keep up on, memoirs are where the true secrets are revealed , and stars like Jessica Simpson, Demi Moore, and more have all made our jaws drop with their revelations in recent years.

To say that these celeb memoirs have rocked our world would be an understatement. From detailing sexual abuse or childhood abuse to opening up about struggles with addiction , rehab, or volatile relationships, these celebrities dug really, really deep, and even explained why they felt compelled to come forward. In short, most celebrities keenly remember a period of time in their lives when they felt lost, confused, and isolated &mdash and they hope that, by speaking out about their own experiences, they can be a symbol of hope and solidarity to those struggling now.

It’s unimaginably brave for these celebrities to have shared all they did, and we’re so grateful they took the time to put it all down on paper. Read on for a complete list of celebrity memoirs that showed us a whole new side to Hollywood, fame, and growing up in the spotlight.

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you&rsquoll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale.

A version of this article was originally published in August 2020.