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Fruit and nut mix recipe

Fruit and nut mix recipe

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A colourful mix of nuts, seeds, dried berries and raisins make this a healthy, energising snack on-the-go.

6 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 35g almonds
  • 35g walnuts
  • 35g pumpkin seeds
  • 35g sunflower seeds
  • 30g dried cranberries
  • 30g goji berries
  • 40g raisins
  • 40g dark chocolate chips (optional)

MethodPrep:10min ›Ready in:10min

  1. Combine almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, cranberries, goji berries, raisins and chocolate chips in a bowl.
  2. Store in an airtight container or resealable plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(3)

Reviews in English (2)

by Ryan and Micaela Mendoza

This is a good trail mix. It was hard to find the Goji berries in the store. Kroger's had them in their healthy food section. They are expensive, so this recipe was really great at dividing the berries up. I tripled the amounts and put a quarter cup each of the mix in snack bags. Now whenever I go to the gym or am rushing out the door without my lunch, I can grab a snack bag of this mix and I'm good to go.-15 Jan 2016

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Fruit, Nut and Seed Bars Recipe

Homemade fruit, nut and seed bars are a nutritious on-the-go snack.

If you’re looking for an on-the-go snack that is easy to pack without forsaking nutrition, fruit and nut bars or other “energy” bars can be a healthy choice. But it all depends on what you get: While some commercial bars deliver on the promise of providing a nutritious alternative to candy bars, many are packed with chemicals, refined sugar and cereal fillers. Reading the label goes a long way toward finding the healthy choice, but it comes with a price tag that may have one wondering why healthy living is so darn expensive.

Homemade fruit, nut and seeds bars aren’t just less expensive, they provide an all-natural alternative to store-bought bars that are packed with protein, vitamins and can be adjusted to please any palate. The best part? You can use ingredients found growing in your own backyard.

Moist, chewy and sweet, these DIY lunchbox or briefcase stuffers will satisfy a mid-morning craving with a quick bite of vitamin-rich dried fruit, protein-rich nuts and seeds and rolled oats chock full of fiber. All held together with sweet, natural honey, these homemade snack bars have everything you’re looking for without the oils, refined sugar or confusing additives found in many store-bought snack bars.

Mix and match your favorite fruits and nuts to create a flavor profile all your own. If you’re growing your own ingredients, there’s never been a better excuse to try your hand at drying fruit at home (figs, apples, or grapes are a good place to start). Once you’ve mastered the basics, consider adding fresh herbs like mint or rosemary to the mix to create delicious bars that capture even more fantastic flavor from the garden.


No Knead Fruit and Nut Bread

If you need bread, but are not into kneading. here's a delicious fruit and nut bread using the famous technique (or lack thereof) of Jim Lahey where there's no kneading required. It does require a little planning to accommodate the 18 hour rise time, but the wait is worth it!

What is No Knead Bread?

No knead bread is exactly what it says it is – bread that requires no kneading whatsoever. No knead bread became a craze several years ago when Jim Lahey of the Sullivan Street Bakery in New York City figured out that you don’t have to knead bread dough to get the critical gluten development required for a perfect loaf. Instead, if you have patience, time will do the job. Letting the bread dough rise slowly (very slowly), allows the gluten to develop just as well as kneading it. Hence, no need to knead!

If you’ve tried my recipe for No Knead Bread or Whole Wheat No Knead Bread, you’re in for a treat with this No Knead Fruit and Nut Bread. I’ve tweaked my recipes a little, used both all-purpose flour and whole wheat flour and incorporated dried fruit and nuts into the mix, using the delicious fruit and nut bread from one of my favorite restaurants – Parc in Philadelphia – as the role model.

No Knead Ingredients

For this recipe, you will need very basic ingredients. It starts with all-purpose flour. I often use bread flour in my recipes, and you can certainly substitute that here, but I wanted a recipe that started with all-purpose for the sake of convenience. Add to that a little whole wheat flour, some yeast and some salt. Those, along with some water, are your basic ingredients for no knead bread. To make it fruit and nut bread, you’ll add two cups (total) of dried fruit and nuts. I use half a cup each of golden raisins, dried cranberries, pecans and walnuts, but you could substitute any dried fruit and nuts that you like and have in your pantry.

Stir, Don’t Knead

The beauty of no knead bread is that you don’t need a lot of strength, elbow grease or an electric mixer to make it. You do, however, have to stir all the ingredients together until you no longer see any traces of flour. What you end up with will look rather un-extraordinary, but that’s it. Now you wait.

Rise up!

I let the dough sit in a warm spot of my kitchen, covered loosely with plastic wrap for 18 hours. You can go as little as 8 hours or as long as 18, but the longer the better in my books. That allows for more flavor development in the dough.

Shaping No Knead Bread

Shaping no knead breads can be the trickiest part of the process. With this recipe, however, the dough is not as loose and sticky as with my other no knead bread doughs. Sprinkle a lot of flour on a piece of parchment paper. (I use my favorite little single-use tool – my flour duster – for this.) Then, turn the dough over on itself a few times and shape it loosely into a round and place the untidy side down on the paper.

A Second Rising

Once the dough has been shaped, it still needs to rest and relax for a couple of hours before going into the oven and it needs to be covered while it rests. You could put a clean towel over the bread, but I find it often sticks, making a mess of your shaped loaf. So, invert the bowl that it rose in over the top to keep it from drying out. With my other no knead bread recipes, I invert the dough into a hot cast iron pot, but with this no knead fruit and nut bread I use the parchment to lift the dough into the pot, baking the bread with the parchment paper. This allows you to actually shape the dough the way you want it and makes managing the dough and a very hot cast iron pot much easier. Before you lift that parchment paper and place the dough into the hot cast iron pot, take a baker’s lame or sharp serrated knife and make two or three slashes in the top of the dough. Doing so will give the steam trapped inside the bread an escape route and allows you to control the look of the bread.

The Best Pot for No Knead Bread

The best pot to use for no knead bread is a cast iron pot. It pre-heats in the oven and gets very hot indeed. The thing about cast iron is that it holds the heat and turns into a mini oven inside your oven. If you don’t have a cast iron pot, you can use any other heavy duty lidded pot that is oven safe to 425ºF. The bread might not get quite as crispy a crust, but it will work. Remember that the diameter of your pot will control the size of your loaf. If you have a very large pot, the bread will spread out more and not rise as high. If you have a smaller Dutch oven, the bread will be forced to rise up.

How to Know your No Knead Bread is Done

After baking the bread in a covered pot at 425ºF for 30 minutes and then for another 10 to 15 minutes without the lid, your loaf should have a nice brown crust and should be completely baked inside. If you’re uncertain, you can carefully remove the loaf from the pot and tap the bottom, listening for a hollow sound. To be absolutely certain, you can insert an instant read thermometer into the center of the loaf. It should read 200ºF and there should be no wet batter on the thermometer when you remove it.

How Long will No Knead Bread Keep?

Well, that depends on how hungry you are.

On a serious note, no homemade bread lasts as long as store-bought bread and that is because it has no preservatives in it. That’s a good thing. Homemade bread is always best the day it’s baked, but this bread should last 5 to 7 days in an airtight bag or container or wrapped well. After day 2, it’s best toasted… delicious actually.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 ¼ cups butter or margarine, softened
  • 1 ¼ cups brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 3 cups quick cooking oats
  • 1 cup dried cranberries, or other dried fruit

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C)

In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the egg, then stir in the vanilla. Sift together the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg, gradually stir into the creamed mixture. Finally, stir in the quick oats and dried fruit. Drop by rounded spoonfuls onto the unprepared cookie sheet.

Bake for 8 to 10 minutes in the preheated oven. Allow cookies to cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes before removing to a wire rack to cool completely.


3/4 cup (95 grams) all purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon (1 gram) baking powder

1/4 teaspoon (1 gram) baking soda

1/4 teaspoon (1 gram) kosher salt

3/4 cup (160 grams) firmly packed light brown sugar

3 cups (300 grams) coarsely chopped nuts (walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, and/or almonds)

3 cups (400 grams) dried fruits (dried cherries, dried cranberries, raisins, dried apricots, dried mango, currants, dates, prunes, and/or figs (pits removed and cut into quarters))


Fruit and Nut Trail Mix

I make tasty nut-free trail mixes for healthy snacks. In order to best stabilize blood sugar and provide lasting energy, snacks should be a balance of protein and carbohydrates. Conveniently, this trail mix packs both, along with a healthy dose of omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin C, vitamin E, antioxidants, fiber, and other vitamins and minerals. I like goji berries because they are lower in sugar than other dried fruit, good for those of us that need to watch our sugar intake.

Don't tolerate some of the ingredients I used? No worries! The recipe is really flexible! Remove whatever ingredients you don't tolerate, and add whatever you else you'd like - you can't mess it up. Make it your own. Crunchy, full of flavor, and loaded with nutrients, this trail mix is a lifesaver. Where can it come in handy?
I make tasty nut-free trail mixes for healthy snacks. In order to best stabilize blood sugar and provide lasting energy, snacks should be a balance of protein and carbohydrates. Conveniently, this trail mix packs both, along with a healthy dose of omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin C, vitamin E, antioxidants, fiber, and other vitamins and minerals. I like goji berries because they are lower in sugar than other dried fruit, good for those of us that need to watch our sugar intake.

Don't tolerate some of the ingredients I used? No worries! The recipe is really flexible! Remove whatever ingredients you don't tolerate, and add whatever you else you'd like - you can't mess it up. Make it your own. Crunchy, full of flavor, and loaded with nutrients, this trail mix is a lifesaver. Where can it come in handy?


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Homemade fruit and nut crisps

One of my favorite meals is this: Cheese, crackers, fruit, olives, maybe a cured meat like prosciutto or summer sausage. Plus wine. And chocolate for dessert. The end. Repeat forever and ever.

Every few weeks, the husband and I will make a smorgasbord of these foods for dinner and just snack away while catching up on our Netflix queue (House of Cards, amiright?). It’s the best, because we usually buy too much of everything and then end up with a ton of leftovers to enjoy for lunch the next day.

Recently I introduced to our snack-y dinner situation some fruit and nut crisps I got from the grocery store that are insanely delicious. I first had them at the dinner club I’m a part of and I could. not. stop. eating. them. But the box costs a pretty penny and because they’re so good, we tend to devour the contents within a day or two. No bueno.

So I did the food blogger thing, and I made some myself.

Guys and gals, these are the real deal. They taste just like those fancy, expensive storebought crackers but they’re made from scratch and much more affordable. They’re also incredibly easy, and the recipe makes more than what you’d get in a typical box — which is to say, we went through this batch in about four days as opposed to two.

They’re also incredibly versatile. You can mix in your own favorite nuts (I used a combination of almonds, cashews, pistachios and hazelnuts) and dried fruits (I used golden raisins, but cranberries, regular raisins or chopped dried apricots would be fantastic, too). The same goes for the seeds — I used flax seeds, but sunflower seeds or pepitas would be great additions as well. You can even add chopped fresh or dried herbs, like rosemary or thyme, if you want. Just mix it all together in a bowl with some flour, sugar, salt, baking soda and milk, bake it in a loaf pan, freeze it, slice it and bake again until crisp.

And because they’re so thin, they cool very quickly and you can eat them pretty much right away. BONUS.

We, of course, have been eating them with cheese, but they’re good with just about anything or nothing at all. Just don’t be surprised if you, like us, leave them in a container on the kitchen counter within constant view and suddenly, they disappear. Good thing another batch is just hours away.

Me + couch + cheese + fruit and nut crisps + wine + Thursday night + Netflix = let’s do this.


Ingredients

  • 1 cup ice cubes
  • 2/3 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/2 cup frozen mango cubes
  • 1/3 cup sliced strawberries
  • 1/4 cup toasted walnut halves
  • 1/4 cup canned light coconut milk

Nutritional Information

  • Calories 350
  • Fat 19.8g
  • Satfat 4.4g
  • Monofat 2.3g
  • Polyfat 12g
  • Protein 7g
  • Carbohydrate 43g
  • Fiber 5g
  • Cholesterol 0.0mg
  • Iron 2mg
  • Sodium 18mg
  • Calcium 52mg
  • Sugars 31g
  • Est. added sugars 0g

Recipe: Freeze-Dried Fruit, Nut, and Seed Trail Mix

Trail mix seems like the perfect snack to keep you energized and moving on long hikes. The problem is that most trail mix include “sugar nuggets” – dried fruit, chocolate chips, even candy pieces – all of which will leave you crashing and hungry.

Meet trail mix done right, with freeze-dried fruit, nuts, and seeds! You’ll get plenty of vitamins, protein, and nutrients without all that added sugar. Whether you’re gearing up for a camping trip or just want something munchable with lunch, this recipe is a winner.

Want to make your trail mix extra irresistible, plus add a protein boost? Chop up two Paleo Brownie Bars into tiny chunks and add it to the recipe below. Now you've invited chewy chocolate goodness to the party, too!