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How to Make Pie Pastry

How to Make Pie Pastry

A recipe and tips for making pie pastry from the famous French cooking school, LaVarenne

Good pie pastry is light and flaky.

Homemade pie pastry has many uses, both sweet and savory. It can be used in pot pies, quiches, fruit pies, and more. The key to good pie pastry is to keep the fat (in this case the butter and shortening) cold during the pastry-making process. Cold fat won’t fully incorporate into the flour mixture (you’ll have some visible pieces of fat in your dough), which will melt when the pastry is cooked, leaving small pockets in the dough — this is what makes pie pastry light and flaky. Anne Willan’s LaVarenne Pratique, an essential culinary reference book for both novice and expert cooks, shares this recipe for pie pastry.

To make a 10-inch shell
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar (for sweet pies)
⅓ cup cold, unsalted butter
⅓ cup shortening or lard
1 egg yolk (optional)
¼ cup cold water (more if needed)

Sift the flour with the salt (and sugar if using) into a bowl. Add the butter and shortening to the flour and cut the fat into small pieces with a pastry cutter or two knives (using one in each hand).

(Credit: Shutterstock)

Then, rub the pieces of butter and shortening with your fingertips until the mixture forms fine crumbs, lifting and crumbling to help aerate it. Be careful not to handle the butter and shortening too much though — you don’t want to warm or melt it.

Make a well in the center of the mixture; add the egg yolk (if using) and the water.

(Credit: Shutterstock)

Mix quickly with a knife to form crumbs. If the crumbs are dry, mix in 1 to 2 tablespoons more water. Press the dough together with your fingers. It should be soft but not sticky.

(Credit: Shutterstock)
Work the dough lightly with your hand for a few seconds to form a rough disc. Wrap it tightly in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for 30 minutes or until it is firm.

For more recipes, tips, and techniques, visit LaVarenne’s website or buy a digital copy of LaVarenne Pratique.

Kristie Collado is The Daily Meal's Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @KColladoCook.


How to Make Pie Crust, Step-by-Step

Whether you've never made pie crust or you just need to sharpen your skills, you've come to the right place.

We&aposll show you how to make a pie crust step by step, with lots of tips along the way. You&aposll learn how to make pie dough, how to roll it out, and how to put it in your pie pan. If you&aposre looking for how to make and pre-bake pie crust (blind bake), check out how to pre-bake a pie crust.

Video: How to Make Pie Crust

OK, let&aposs start with a video, and then we&aposll break it all down for you. Remember: When it comes to pies, practice makes perfect.


How to Make Pie Pastry in Under One Minute

1 lb flour (approx. 3 1/2 cups) + 8 oz cold, unsalted butter (2 sticks) + 1/8 tsp salt
(if you use salted butter, omit the salt). As usual, I highly recommend a scale for best results. Cups are too unpredictable and results will always vary.

Place all the ingredients, with the cold butter cut into chunks, into the food processor.


A few pulses and the butter is mixed in.

Then add a little ice water a few more pulses and it is ready to roll (literally)!

Your pastry should look like this, and sort of come together, but still be somewhat crumbly when ready. Don’t add too much water, though, as it will make the crust tough. Shape the pie pastry into a ball, cover with cling wrap and refrigerate for at least half an hour.

Finally, just roll out the pie pastry and use as desired for savory dishes or sweet. If you want to use it for a sweet pie or tart, you can add a teaspoon or even less of sugar, to make it a little more suited for a dessert filling. (See the Strawberry Tart recipe posted below).

Makes enough for one, double crust pie (bottom and top). Another way to use the pastry is to make tartlets. This recipe will make about 24 tartlet shells.


3/4 cup or 175 g butter at room temperature
1 3/4 cups or 225 g Plain / All purpose flour (sieved)
pinch of salt
1/4-1/2 cup or 100 ml of cold water
2 tablespoons sugar if making a sweet dish.

1. Mix the sieved flour and salt in a bowl. (add sugar if using)

2. Weigh out the butter and divide into 4 amounts.

3. Add one portion of the butter to the flour and using a round-bladed knife, incorporate the butter and flour, whilst slowly adding enough cold water until the mixture comes together to form an elastic dough.

4. Dust the rolling surface with flour, and turn the dough out. Roll out the dough into a rectangle shape (see photo) and keep rolling, adding more flour if necessary to stop from sticking, until the dough is about 4 mm thickness.

5. Rub any excess flour from the surface and using the next portion of butter, dot the butter (about 1 cm dots) on two-thirds of the rolled out pastry evenly. (see photo).

6. Fold the pastry into three portions, bringing the end without butter to the center, then folding down the other third. (see photo)

How to fold pastry

7. Press together pastry edges with your fingers, give the pastry half a turn and roll out lightly again until the pastry is 4 mm thick (same size before you dotted with butter).

8. Repeat steps 5 - 7 twice more, then fold into three, cover with plastic wrap and chill in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Whilst the pastry is resting in the fridge, set your oven temperature to 200C, 400F, gas mark 6 if using pastry as a pie with filling.

Cooking time about 20 - 35 minutes.

If just cooking the pastry on its own, such as vol au vents, oven temperature should be 230C, 450F, gas Mark 8, cooking time about 8-10 minutes

Before placing in the oven, brush the TOP with milk and NOT the sides as this will prevent the pastry from rising.

Then sprinkle some sugar, spices such as cinnamon, if a sweet dish, or savory spices, like jerk seasoning, cajun spices, actually, anything that takes your fancy!

Cooking times will vary depending on what you are using the pastry for.

As a rough guide, 8-10 minutes for something small, 20-35 minutes for larger pies, or until the pastry takes on a nice golden brown color.

If you have any flaky pastry left over, why not make these Mini Cherry Hand Pies. they're really easy!

We'd love to hear from you and what you thought of our quick and easy flaky pastry recipe. Did you make any changes or add some other goodies? Let us know in the comments below. Thanks for reading and happy cooking!


How to Make Pie Crust

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Few things in the baked-goods canon are as impressive as tender, flaky homemade pie crust. The alchemy of pie dough — the transformation of flour, water, salt and butter (or lard, shortening or some combination thereof) into a unified whole — is simple, yet pie crust is one of the most-intimidating recipes for home cooks to master. But we're here to reassure you that it's not as hard as you think. Armed with our best recipes and pastry pros' top tips, you'll be mixing, rolling and crimping your way to pie crust victory in no time.

Feeling nervous about tackling homemade pie crust? Keep calm and make pie, we say. Allow yourself plenty of time to find a recipe that you like, and try making it a few times to gain confidence in the kitchen. Speaking of chilling out, one of the most-important steps to ensuring a tender, flaky crust is to remember to keep your pie dough ingredients cold. Alton likes to keep his pie dough ingredients really cold. His Pie Crust recipe calls for keeping butter and lard in the freezer prior to incorporating them into the dough.

For a step-by-step guide to the coolest crust, download the Food Network Kitchen app and watch the video for Martha's Favorite Pie Crust. Martha's recipe calls on ice-cold butter, but the game changer is putting your pie crust back in the fridge if it gets too warm. You want to roll out your crust while the dough is extremely cold. So if your dough feels stretchy or warm, into the fridge it goes!

If you're in the all-butter camp, try your hand at making The Best All-Butter Pie Dough (pictured). Using all butter creates a rich flavor, and layering the dough puff-pastry style yields an exceptionally tender and flaky crust. Be sure to use unsalted butter to control the amount of salt you add to your dough. Whether you use European or American butter is a personal preference.

Courtney Fuqua, the executive pastry chef at Salt Traders Coastal Cooking in Austin, Texas, prefers using a mix of fats. "I like to use 50/50 mix of butter and shortening. This way, you get flavor from the butter and flakiness from the shortening — the best of both worlds!" she says. Ina, too, pulls in both butter and extra-cold shortening for her aptly named Perfect Pie Crust.

"I'm a fan of lard — even though I have a vegetarian mother," Jubilee cookbook author Toni Tipton-Martin says. Lard is lauded for both its rich flavor and its ability to produce a supremely flaky crust. Tipton-Martin favors a mix of lard and butter, while Amy Thielen relies almost exclusively on rendered leaf lard (with just a touch of butter) to create a crust with an almost croissantlike texture.

When Tipton-Martin is making large batches of pie dough in the food processor, she adds cream cheese to keep the dough from becoming overworked and tough. Try this virtually foolproof Cream Cheese Crust recipe.

Whitney Otawka, chef at the Greyfield Inn on Cumberland Island, Georgia, and author of The Saltwater Table: Recipes from the Coastal South, loves the flavor of buckwheat flour. "It's nutty and earthy, and it really complements classic autumn flavors like pumpkin, cinnamon and ginger," she says. "When using it in a pie dough, I'll swap about half of the all-purpose flour for buckwheat flour. Since buckwheat is naturally gluten-free, I will knead the dough for an extra minute just to help it form together."

Add a secret ingredient

Unexpected additions can both help ensure pie crust success and provide another way to experiment with flavors. Many pastry pros turn to vodka as their secret agent for a tender, flaky crust. Try this straightforward Vodka Pie Dough recipe — and don't worry, the booze cooks off. The Butter Pie Crust recipe calls on apple cider vinegar (or white vinegar) to help ensure a tender (not tough) texture.

Adding spice to the crust complements other elements of the pie and can enhance seasonal flavors, as it does in this Pumpkin Pie with Spiced Crust. A blend of ground cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, allspice and freshly grated nutmeg punches up both the filling and the crust. Brian Noyes, owner of Red Truck Rural Bakery in Marshall, Virginia, reveals his secret weapon in his Red Truck Bakery Cookbook's Classic Piecrust recipe: "Though [the recipe is] relatively traditional, we incorporate a little bit of lemon and orange zests as a subtle counterpoint to the dough's sweet buttery flavor." Try adding a teaspoon and a half each of orange and lemon zest to your pie dough.

Don't be afraid to take things in a savory direction, too. Nancy Fuller is a fan of cheese in her dough, calling for a cup of extra-sharp white cheddar to add a savory complement to her Granny Smith- and Braeburn-based Apple Pie with Cheddar Cheese Crust.

Work it (don't overwork it)

Otawka makes her pie dough by hand (no expensive kitchen appliances are needed, plus there are fewer dishes to wash afterward). After stirring together all-purpose flour, salt and sugar in a medium-sized mixing bowl, she adds chilled, diced butter and uses her fingertips to rub-pinch the flour and butter together until the butter turns to small flakes and they are dispersed throughout the flour mixture. She then adds a small amount of water to bring it together and mixes it by hand until just incorporated — the dough should still look a little dry and shaggy. Next, she flattens the dough into a disc, wraps it in plastic wrap and lets it rest in the refrigerator for at least one hour. "This gives the gluten, which formed during the dough-making process, time to relax — which will make rolling the dough easier," she explains. For an easy step-by-step tutorial, check out our How To: Make Pie Dough gallery.

Be sure you're working with chilled, rested dough, and use flour to dust your work surface and rolling pin to prevent dough from sticking and ripping. "When you start rolling, I find it helpful to start by pressing the rolling pin down on the dough to flatten it out a little more, and then gently start to roll it out until it's about an eighth of an inch thick," Otawka says. "The dough should look slightly dry and not be a fully homogenous dough. It will come together when resting. Don't overwork the dough — doing so can lead to dense, non-flaky pie [crust]." After lining the pan with the pie dough (leaving about an inch of overhang for crimping), Otawka stashes it in the freezer for 10 minutes. "This re-chills the butter to create an evenly flakier texture it also helps prevent the dough from shrinking when it's added to the oven," she explains.

Practice your crimping and latticework

Crimping is an art form, but don't get too hung up on getting it to look perfect. "Using both hands, I place the thumbs and index fingers together on each hand and pinch the dough together to make an attractive indentation around the pie," Otawka says. Even simpler? Press the ends of fork tines into the edges of the dough for a classic look.

Once you've filled your pie, a lattice topper is another way to add visual flair. Learning to layer strips of dough to create that woven effect takes practice, but you can give yourself a head start. The Best Pie Dough for a Lattice Crust recipe calls for a mix of shortening and butter, yielding an easy-to-work-with-dough that's also forgiving during the cutting and weaving process. This step-by-step tutorial helps take the guesswork out.

If you're still intimidated by latticework, try topping your pie filling with cutouts instead. "There are so many fun mini cookie cutter sets available to decorate your pies with right now," says Diana Sanchez, executive pastry chef at Jack Allen's Kitchen in Austin. "You can always use a paring knife to cut leaf designs out of extra dough, which is a pretty simple and classic design." Once you've topped your pie, Sanchez recommends brushing the crust with an egg wash it gives the baked pie a beautiful sheen and helps protect the edges from breaking. Looking for more pie crust design inspo? Check out our primer on How to Cut Pie Crust Designs (there's even a faux-lattice one!).

Once you've mastered your favorite pie crust recipe, make a double batch and freeze it. Most chefs recommend flattening pie dough into discs in individual portions (each enough for one top or one bottom crust), then wrapping the discs tightly in plastic wrap, putting them in a freezer-safe bag and stashing them in the freezer for up to two to three months. Follow this technique for any amount of extra pie dough — you can use it for individual chicken pot pies, a rustic galette or a batch of dumplings. For more pie-scrap recipe inspiration, peruse our 10 Ways to Use Leftover Pie Dough Scraps gallery.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 4 cups water
  • 4 Granny Smith apples - peeled, cored and sliced
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 (17.25 ounce) package frozen puff pastry sheets, thawed
  • 1 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Combine the lemon and 4 cups water in a large bowl. Place the sliced apples in the water to keep them from browning.

Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Drain water from apples, and place them into the hot skillet. Cook and stir for about 2 minutes. Add brown sugar, and cinnamon, and cook, stirring, for 2 more minutes. Stir together cornstarch and 1 tablespoon water. Pour into the skillet, and mix well. Cook for another minute, or until sauce has thickened. Remove from heat to cool slightly.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

Unfold puff pastry sheets, and repair any cracks by pressing them back together. Trim each sheet into a square. Then cut each larger square into 4 smaller squares. Spoon apples onto the center of each squares. Fold over from corner to corner into a triangle shape, and press edges together to seal. Place turnovers on a baking sheet, leaving about 1 inch between them.

Bake for 25 minutes in the preheated oven, until turnovers are puffed and lightly browned. Cool completely before glazing.

To make the glaze, mix together the confectioners' sugar, milk and vanilla in a small bowl. Adjust the thickness by adding more sugar or milk if necessary. Drizzle glaze over the cooled turnovers.

If you do not wish to make the glaze, you can brush beaten egg over the top of each turnover, and sprinkle with white sugar before baking.


How to Make A Perfectly Flaky Savory Pie Crust

I have yet to share my savory pie crust recipe with you until now but considering it’s the holiday season, and I’m going to be sharing my Thanksgiving Leftovers Pie, this is a perfect time. It has what I love in a pie crust — a generous amount of butter — yielding a perfect flake that will actually work for both sweet and savory pies. Before you get started, though, I strongly urge you to check out my 7 Tips and Tricks for Making the Best Pie Crust to get you started on the right track.

Why is My Pie Crust Soggy?

This can be for many reasons, but most commonly it comes down to what type of filling you have in your pie. A way to prevent a soggy bottom is to bake your pie on a preheated baking sheet AND on the bottom shelf of the oven close to the heat source. The pre-heated tray will ensure your dough is crisping from the bottom.

Do you need to blind bake your pie crust before the filling goes in? Follow my step by step instructions here.

Why is my Pie Crust Shrinking?

Shrinking pastry can often come down to too much water in your pastry. Think about it practically: when water heats up it evaporates. If it evaporated from your pastry that will cause your pastry to shrink. That is why I use egg instead of all water and I stress not to add all the liquid in at the one time as you might not need it. You just need enough for your dough to form a tight ball.

How Do You Bake a Pie Crust From Frozen?

Do just as you would if it were fresh! Pop it into the oven and bake for the same amount of time. A fun baking fact: Freezing your pie crust in the pan and baking it off from frozen can eliminate the need to line with parchment and beans before blind baking.

When is my Pie Done?

Regardless of what pie you are making, your pie is ready when you have a lovely golden brown color on your pastry.

How do I Store Savory Pie Crust?

Store your pie crust wrapped in the fridge or in the freezer.

How Long Does Savory Pie Crust Last?

In the fridge, the pie crust will last 48 hours. After this time you will notice the dough can go a grayish color and shouldn’t be sued in baking. Personally I love to freeze my pie crust and have a stash in my freezer around the holidays. You can freeze it well wrapped and labeled for up to 6 weeks.


How to make pie crust in your stand mixer

Is it a good idea to make pie crust using a stand mixer? Or is it really better to combine all of the ingredients — the flour and salt, fat and water — by hand?

The vast majority of pie crust recipes (including those here on our recipe site) direct you to combine the dry ingredients, then work the fat in using a pastry blender, pastry fork, two knives, or your hands.

As far as using one of your handy countertop appliances, some folks say you can make pie crust using a food processor. But never will you see anyone espousing the use of a stand mixer (or electric hand mixer) to make pie crust.

Why is that? We use our trusty stand mixers for everything from brownie batter to bread dough — why not pie crust?

Some say a mixer toughens crust. Others say it doesn't flatten the fat in just the right way. And for some, I think it's simply resistance to change: Great-Grandma didn't use a mixer, and neither do I!

Well, I'm going to tell you a little secret: I've been using my stand mixer to make pie crust for years. Nay, decades, ever since I got my first mixer by saving S&H Green Stamps (and if you know what those are, you know how long ago that was!).

Truthfully, you may get marginally flakier pie crust by flattening each little piece of cold butter by hand as you work it into the flour. But these days, my aging hands, wrists, and shoulders — to say nothing of my patience — are sorely tried by the process.

I've used a stand mixer to make pie crust forever, and people have always raved about my crust. And I believe that using a stand mixer to make pie crust is a perfectly reasonable solution for those who don't want to work fat and flour together by hand.

Can you make pie crust using a stand mixer? Yes indeed — and here's how.

I'm using our recipe for Classic Double Pie Crust here, which combines both butter and shortening. The recipe yields crust with a textural combination of tender shortbread and flaky croissant — with a generous measure of crispness thrown in.

To make pie crust, first combine flour, salt, and shortening

I put 2 1/2 cups (10 1/2 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour, 1 1/4 teaspoons salt, and 1/4 cup vegetable shortening into the bowl of my stand mixer. I then use the beater attachment at speed 2 to create an evenly crumbly mixture. (I've poured the mixture out onto a piece of parchment so you can see it clearly.)

This first step, thoroughly combining shortening with flour, is what produces a tender crust. Fat coats the flour, which helps prevent gluten from forming strong bonds. When you cut into your baked crust, it breaks easily — which registers as "tender."

Next, cut ice-cold butter into small cubes

This recipe uses 10 tablespoons of unsalted butter. A baker's bench knife is very handy here. These butter cubes will separate from one another as you mix them into the flour.

Add the butter to the flour/shortening

Beat on a low setting (speed 2) until the mixture is unevenly crumbly. That's unevenly crumbly: you want dime-sized chunks of butter to remain unmixed.

Add ice-cold water as the mixer is running

The recipe I'm following calls for 6 to 10 tablespoons of water. However much water your recipe calls for, don't add it all at once drizzle it in slowly. When you see the mixture start to form larger clumps, stop adding water (and stop the mixer).

Stop mixing when the dough becomes cohesive

Grab a handful of the crumbs and squeeze. Do they hold together? If not, continue to drizzle with water until the dough is cohesive when squeezed.

When that happens, you're ready to add enough of the remaining water to make a crust that comes together nicely, without any crumbs remaining in the bottom of the bowl. Stop the mixer — you're done!

Gather the pastry into a ball and transfer it to your work surface. I like to work on parchment it makes cleanup super-easy.

Divide the dough

Shape the cohesive dough into two disks. For a double-crust pie, one disk should be about twice as large as the other. The larger piece will be the bottom crust, the smaller one the top crust.

Chill and roll

Refrigerate for 30 minutes or so, and you're ready to roll. This short chill lets the flour absorb the water, as mentioned above, and solidifies the fats, making the crust a bit easier to roll.

See that white patch in the photo? That's a flattened piece of butter, and that's exactly what you want to see in your unbaked crust: flat chunks of butter, big and small. These butter chunks will translate to flakiness as the pie bakes.

So at the end of the day, how do you know if it's really OK to make pie crust using a stand mixer?

The proof is in the pudding — er, pie!

I'm betting there aren't many who'd turn down this slice of Apple Pie, made with the crust you saw prepared above.

Now remember, there's no such thing as baking police if you've always made your wonderfully flaky and delicious pie crust using a pastry blender, food processor, or your hands, keep on keeping on. If your pie crust prep ain't broke – don't fix it!

But if you hesitate to make pie crust because you're unsure of your hand-blending technique, or your arms and hands can't take it, or you simply love the convenience of your electric mixer — go for it. Put away that pastry fork for good — no one will ever be the wiser!

Ready to put that pie crust to use? Browse our extensive collection of pie recipes for some baking inspiration.


DelbertK Album

Mary Berrys Short Crust Pastry Recipe Pastry Recipe / How To Make Sweet Short Crust Pastry A Foolproof Food Processor Method : Every baker i know seems to have their favorite recipe or trick.. This foolproof recipe shows how to make it by hand or with a food processor, and shares tips for success. Jamie oliver's old fashioned sweet shortcrust pastry is perfect for loads of lovely recipes, from apple pie to tarte au citron! A smart, delicate tart starring tender apricots and an almond frangipane filling in a crisp pastry case. If using a food processor, pulse the butter and flour together until the mix resembles fine breadcrumbs. And this shortcrust recipe isn't just for sweet desserts!

You can even roll it out, line the tart. Pastry recipes tart recipes baking recipes dessert recipes short pastry homemade pastries shortcrust pastry british baking just desserts. Reduce the plain flour to 150g (1 cup). Add 55g (1/2 cup) almond or hazelnut meal and 60g (1/3 cup) icing sugar mixture to the flour in step 1. Top with juicy fruit and pinch the pastry round the edges to create a rustic finish.

Mary Berry S Lemon Tart Recipe Recipe Lemon Tart Recipe Mary Berry Lemon Tart Tart Recipes from i.pinimg.com Pastry recipes tart recipes baking recipes dessert recipes short pastry homemade pastries shortcrust pastry british baking just desserts. 225g plain flour (1.5 cups) 3 tsp icing sugar 140g. Shortcrust pastry freezes more successfully when it has been rolled out or shaped as required what is the best size short crust pastry tin size? Make it the day before. Trust mary berry's leek and stilton quiche recipe for a. Shortcrust is probably the most widely used of all pastries and is good with sweet or savory fillings. What it provides is a light crisp, melting crust, which has all the important flavours of the. Omit the water in step 2.

Make it the day before.

Making shortcrust pastry really is not as difficult as you'd think. You can use it for savoury recipes too like meat pies, chicken pot pies. Measure the flour into a large bowl and rub in the butter with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs (alternatively, this can be done in a food processor). It is a good pastry for handling and for rolling and creates a lovely taut crust. This pastry is used in my recently posted onion and olive tart recipe #140798 in which the sugar and. Reduce the plain flour to 150g (1 cup). If making the pastry by hand, rub the butter into the flour and icing sugar until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs, then stir in the beaten egg and bring together to form a dough. Cut the butter into cubes and add to the bowl or food processor. What it provides is a light crisp, melting crust, which has all the important flavours of the. Shortcrust pastry, when you have a good recipe, is one of the simplest and quickest pastries to make. Make it the day before. 225g plain flour (1.5 cups) 3 tsp icing sugar 140g. The pastry should be pale golden and the filling soft when pierced with a knife.

This foolproof recipe shows how to make it by hand or with a food processor, and shares tips for success. Place 350g (12oz) plain flour in a bowl. Jamie oliver's old fashioned sweet shortcrust pastry is perfect for loads of lovely recipes, from apple pie to tarte au citron! Measure the flour into a large bowl and rub in the butter with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs (alternatively, this can be done in a food processor). It is a good pastry for handling and for rolling and creates a lovely taut crust.

/>Mary Berry S Feather Topped Bakewell Tart Recipe Bbc Food from food-images.files.bbci.co.uk Trust mary berry's leek and stilton quiche recipe for a. Omit the water in step 2. And this shortcrust recipe isn't just for sweet desserts! The most classic pie or pastry crust. What it provides is a light crisp, melting crust, which has all the important flavours of the. Try making your own shortcrust pastry with crunchy semolina. Follow these tips for great results every time and try these sweet and this is my favorite recipe as it is the most versatile. Easy and economical to make for use to make your own pies and tarts.

This recipe makes enough for a 23cm round tart case, a 24cm square tart case, 10 x 6 cm individual tart cases, a 31 cm x 10 cm tart case or 24 tartlet cases (1.

If making the pastry by hand, rub the butter into the flour and icing sugar until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs, then stir in the beaten egg and bring together to form a dough. What it provides is a light crisp, melting crust, which has all the important flavours of the. If using a food processor, pulse the butter and flour together until the mix resembles fine breadcrumbs. Several pie crust recipes—an all butter pie crust, or pate brisee, an all butter crust with almonds, combining butter and shortening crust, and how there are many different ways to make a pie crust. Measure the flour into a large bowl and rub in the butter with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs (alternatively, this can be done in a food processor). You can use it for savoury recipes too like meat pies, chicken pot pies. Every baker i know seems to have their favorite recipe or trick. It is a good pastry for handling and for rolling and creates a lovely taut crust. Click here for more delicious mary berry recipes… Please note referring to a 250ml metric cup for usa cups + 2 tablespoons. Trust mary berry's leek and stilton quiche recipe for a. Add to my recipe book. Reduce the plain flour to 150g (1 cup).

And this shortcrust recipe isn't just for sweet desserts! Try making your own shortcrust pastry with crunchy semolina. Classic shortcrust pastry really is so quick and easy to make. The pastry should be pale golden and the filling soft when pierced with a knife. Mary berry shows you how to make a sweet shortcrust pastry, which will form the base of a classic tarte au citron.

Bakewell Tart Traybake Christmas Baking Rolling With Marbles from 3.bp.blogspot.com And this shortcrust recipe isn't just for sweet desserts! Times given are when using a food processor, if doing by hand still does not include sugar for sweet pastry. Find more pastry and baking recipes at bbc good food. Many times with shortcrust pastry recipes, you can get away with using a food processor to mix the crust. Shortcrust pastry, when you have a good recipe, is one of the simplest and quickest pastries to make. It is a good pastry for handling and for rolling and creates a lovely taut crust. Shortcrust is probably the most widely used of all pastries and is good with sweet or savory fillings. Add to my recipe book.

Top short crust pastry recipes and other great tasting recipes with a healthy slant from sparkrecipes.com.

Prep 15 mins, plus 30 mins chilling. Top with juicy fruit and pinch the pastry round the edges to create a rustic finish. Follow these tips for great results every time and try these sweet and this is my favorite recipe as it is the most versatile. Sift the flour and salt into a dish or food processor. Easy family food for every day of the week'. Measure the flour into a large bowl and rub in the butter with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs (alternatively, this can be done in a food processor). This foolproof recipe shows how to make it by hand or with a food processor, and shares tips for success. Add about three tablespoons of cold water and mix to a firm dough, wrap in cling film and. A recipe for a rich shortcrust pastry which i found in the november 2005 issue of the australian magazine 'table: This is a great tart to serve for a party. Flaky and buttery, just as it should be! Make perfect shortcrust pastry every time with our easy recipe. Jamie oliver's old fashioned sweet shortcrust pastry is perfect for loads of lovely recipes, from apple pie to tarte au citron!

Source: upload.wikimedia.org

The most classic pie or pastry crust. First make the short crust pastry: Prep 15 mins, plus 30 mins chilling. Top short crust pastry recipes and other great tasting recipes with a healthy slant from sparkrecipes.com. This is a great tart to serve for a party.

Source: static.independent.co.uk

Add 55g (1/2 cup) almond or hazelnut meal and 60g (1/3 cup) icing sugar mixture to the flour in step 1. Click here for more delicious mary berry recipes… What it provides is a light crisp, melting crust, which has all the important flavours of the. It is a good pastry for handling and for rolling and creates a lovely taut crust. You could use a bought 500g (18 oz) pack of shortcrust pastry if time is short.

A quick and easy quiche crust recipe (shortcrust pastry). This is my recipe for quiche crust which i'm publishing separately so it's handy to reference for the quiche recipes i've shared and the many more i will inevitably share over. Several pie crust recipes—an all butter pie crust, or pate brisee, an all butter crust with almonds, combining butter and shortening crust, and how there are many different ways to make a pie crust. The pastry should be pale golden and the filling soft when pierced with a knife. First make the short crust pastry:

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First make the short crust pastry: Shortcrust is probably the most widely used of all pastries and is good with sweet or savory fillings. Shortcrust pastry, when you have a good recipe, is one of the simplest and quickest pastries to make. Easy family food for every day of the week'. No fail recipe, works every time.

Find more pastry and baking recipes at bbc good food. 125g of butter, 250g of flour, 1 tsp salt, 1 tbsp of water. A quick and easy quiche crust recipe (shortcrust pastry). Shortcrust pastry freezes more successfully when it has been rolled out or shaped as required what is the best size short crust pastry tin size? Add about three tablespoons of cold water and mix to a firm dough, wrap in cling film and.

Add about three tablespoons of cold water and mix to a firm dough, wrap in cling film and. Shortcrust pastry, when you have a good recipe, is one of the simplest and quickest pastries to make. Pastry recipes tart recipes baking recipes dessert recipes short pastry homemade pastries shortcrust pastry british baking just desserts. Mary berry shows you how to make a sweet shortcrust pastry, which will form the base of a classic tarte au citron. Click here for more delicious mary berry recipes…

Mary berry shows you how to make a sweet shortcrust pastry, which will form the base of a classic tarte au citron. Cut the butter into cubes and add to the bowl or food processor. This recipe makes enough for a 23cm round tart case, a 24cm square tart case, 10 x 6 cm individual tart cases, a 31 cm x 10 cm tart case or 24 tartlet cases (1. Make perfect shortcrust pastry every time with our easy recipe. Find more pastry and baking recipes at bbc good food.

A recipe for a rich shortcrust pastry which i found in the november 2005 issue of the australian magazine 'table: A smart, delicate tart starring tender apricots and an almond frangipane filling in a crisp pastry case. To access this service, please log into your meilleur du chef account or create a new account. You can even roll it out, line the tart. Shortcrust is probably the most widely used of all pastries and is good with sweet or savory fillings.

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Try making your own shortcrust pastry with crunchy semolina. Many times with shortcrust pastry recipes, you can get away with using a food processor to mix the crust. You can even roll it out, line the tart. Several pie crust recipes—an all butter pie crust, or pate brisee, an all butter crust with almonds, combining butter and shortening crust, and how there are many different ways to make a pie crust. Top short crust pastry recipes and other great tasting recipes with a healthy slant from sparkrecipes.com.

Add 55g (1/2 cup) almond or hazelnut meal and 60g (1/3 cup) icing sugar mixture to the flour in step 1.

Follow these tips for great results every time and try these sweet and this is my favorite recipe as it is the most versatile.

No fail recipe, works every time.

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If making the pastry by hand, rub the butter into the flour and icing sugar until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs, then stir in the beaten egg and bring together to form a dough.

Make and roll out the shortcrust pastry:

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To make the pastry, measure the flour into a bowl and rub in the butter with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.

125g of butter, 250g of flour, 1 tsp salt, 1 tbsp of water.

Find more pastry and baking recipes at bbc good food.

This foolproof recipe shows how to make it by hand or with a food processor, and shares tips for success.

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The pastry should be pale golden and the filling soft when pierced with a knife.

Times given are when using a food processor, if doing by hand still does not include sugar for sweet pastry.

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Line the pastry case with foil and fill with baking beans.

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Easy and economical to make for use to make your own pies and tarts.

125g of butter, 250g of flour, 1 tsp salt, 1 tbsp of water.

A quick and easy quiche crust recipe (shortcrust pastry).

Top with juicy fruit and pinch the pastry round the edges to create a rustic finish.

Place 350g (12oz) plain flour in a bowl.

To access this service, please log into your meilleur du chef account or create a new account.

A smart, delicate tart starring tender apricots and an almond frangipane filling in a crisp pastry case.

First make the short crust pastry:

Line the pastry case with foil and fill with baking beans.

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Please note referring to a 250ml metric cup for usa cups + 2 tablespoons.

Cut the butter into cubes and add to the bowl or food processor.

Several pie crust recipes—an all butter pie crust, or pate brisee, an all butter crust with almonds, combining butter and shortening crust, and how there are many different ways to make a pie crust.


For the Dough: Whisk flour, sugar, and salt together in a medium bowl. Cut butter into cubes no smaller than 1/2-inch, and toss with flour mixture to break up the pieces. With your fingertips, smash each cube flat—that's it! No rubbing or cutting. Stir in water, then knead dough against the sides of the bowl until it comes together in a shaggy ball. Dough temperature should register between 65 and 70°F (18 and 21°C) if not, refrigerate briefly before rolling and folding (see note).

Make the Layers: On a generously floured work surface, roll dough into a roughly 10- by 15-inch rectangle. Fold the 10-inch sides to the center, then close the newly formed packet like a book. Fold in half once more, bringing the short sides together to create a thick block. Divide in half with a sharp knife or bench scraper. Dough temperature should still be somewhere between 65 and 70°F (18 and 21°C) if not, refrigerate briefly before proceeding (see note).

For Single-Crusted Pies: Using as much flour as needed, roll one piece into a 14-inch circle this size allows ample room to line the pie plate, with enough overhang to form a generous border. At smaller sizes, the dough will fall short, making it difficult to shape the edges, and the thicker dough will not crisp as intended. Transfer to a 9-inch pie plate the dough should be easy to handle, and will not require any special procedures to move. Dust off excess flour with a pastry brush, using it to nestle dough into the very corners of the pan. With scissors or kitchen shears, trim the edge so that it overhangs by 1 1/4 inches all around. Fold overhang over itself to create a thick border that sits on the top edge of the pie plate, not below. Crimp or shape crust as desired. Repeat with remaining dough. Wrap with plastic and refrigerate at least 2 hours and up to overnight. Use as directed in your favorite recipe.

For a Double-Crusted Pie: Using as much flour as needed, roll one piece into a 14-inch circle this size allows ample room to line the pie plate, with enough overhang to form a generous border. At smaller sizes, the dough will fall short, making it difficult to seal the edges, and the thicker dough will not crisp as intended. Transfer to a 9-inch pie plate the dough should be easy to handle, and will not require any special procedures to move. Dust off excess flour with a pastry brush, using it to nestle dough into the very corners of the pan. With scissors or kitchen shears, trim the edge so that it overhangs by 1 1/4 inches all around. For a solid top crust, roll remaining dough as before for a lattice-top pie, roll into a 9- by 15-inch rectangle instead. Transfer to a baking sheet or parchment-lined cutting board. (The parchment will prevent dough from absorbing any savory odors from the board.) Wrap both portions in plastic and refrigerate at least 2 hours and up to overnight. Use as directed in your favorite recipe after filling the pie and sealing the crusts together, refrigerate 30 minutes before baking.

For a Blind-Baked Pie: Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and preheat to 350°F (180°C). Line pie shell that has been chilled for at least 2 hours (as outlined in Step 3) with a large sheet of aluminum foil, pressing so it conforms to the curves of the plate (a second sheet of aluminum may be needed for full coverage). Fill to the brim with sugar, transfer to a half sheet pan, and bake until fully set and golden around the edges, 60 to 75 minutes. Fold long sides of foil toward the middle, gather short sides, and use both hands to carefully transfer sugar to a heat-safe bowl. Let sugar cool to room temperature. If needed, continue baking crust a few minutes more to brown along the bottom. A full explanation of this process can be found here.