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Wylie Dufresne Scrapping WD-50 Menu

Wylie Dufresne Scrapping WD-50 Menu

No more eggs Benedict at his New York molecular gastronomy restaurant

Jessica Chou

Wylie Dufresne of WD-50

Fans of Wylie Dufresne's eggs Benedict at his New York restaurat WD-50 might want to get reservations now; The New York Times reports that the molecular gastronomy chef is completely revamping his menu this spring.

In the past, Dufresne and his team have kept on classics like the aformentioned eggs Benedict, as well as the corned duck served wtih horseradish and purple mustard. On May 10, however, Dufresne is switching over to tasting menus, versus à la carte items, offering two for guests to choose from.

The first, priced at $155 per person, will feature about 12 entirely new dishes. The second, for $75, is titled "From the Vault" and offers five "greatest hits" dishes. The bar, however, will still serve à la carte items (whew!).

The spring tasting menu will include dishes like "red-hued noodles fashioned from lobster roe, and shiny-skinned lamb sweetbreads in puddles of a sauce made of buttermilk and nasturtium blossoms." There's also talk of a deconstructed pot pie, and a dish where the crew uses "vacuum pressure to press the essence of pistachio oil directly into pores of zucchini." More mad scientist-created delicious food to come.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Sawyer

I first encountered the Sawyer after a late-night gustatory marathon at Momofuku Ko, the twelve-stool East Village restaurant famous for its elaborate and inventive omakase-style tasting menu and a sometimes confounding online reservation system. Even though I had been served far too many courses to remember—the scribbles in my Moleskine notebook that night went from their normal, barely legible state to cave paintings—I left not with a sense of overstuffed food coma, but rather an enlightened eater’s high. Despite the subzero temperatures that bitter January night, I wasn’t ready to call it quits just yet. A nightcap seemed in order, so I walked over to Ko’s sister restaurant, Ssäm Bar.

Don Lee, who spent time at PDT and was then the bar manager for the Momofuku empire, was behind the stick at Ssäm Bar that night, and when I told him I was looking for a post-Ko digestif, he went to work and presented me with the Sawyer, an icy, bitters-soaked twist on a gimlet doctored with nearly thirty dashes of bitters. Don explained that the drink was inspired by wd-50 chef Wylie Dufresne (who loves gin) and was named after Wylie’s daughter. The Sawyer is no longer on the menu at Ssäm Bar, but ask nicely and most of the bartenders will know what you’re after.

Reprinted with permission from Bitters by Brad Thomas Parsons, copyright © 2011. Photos by Ed Anderson © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.


Watch the video: An Appetite for Knowledge. Wylie Dufresne, Chef and Molecular Gastronomy Expert (December 2021).