New recipes

Where to Eat Thanksgiving Dinner in 5 Great U.S. Food Cities

Where to Eat Thanksgiving Dinner in 5 Great U.S. Food Cities

Thanksgiving has been a national holiday in America since 1863, when then-President Lincoln declared a day of "Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens” across the country. George Washington declared the first National Day of Thanksgiving in 1789, setting the date as November 26. It didn't become a fixed annual event, though, until Abraham Lincoln issued a Thanksgiving Proclamation in 1863, declaring that the holiday should be celebrated on the last Thursday of November every year. In 1939, Franklin D. Roosevelt tried unsuccessfully to change this to the second-to-last Thursday of the month (merchants were concerned that when the holiday fell on November 29 or 30, the Christmas shopping season would be curtailed), but critics complained that this would require the reprinting of calendars and cause other problems, and it wasn't until October 6, 1941, that Congress decreed that the holiday should fall as Roosevelt had wished. The Senate amended this just two months later, and on December 26, 1941, President Roosevelt signed a bill officially cementing the day of observation.

Thanksgiving has both a religious connotation and a patriotic one. It commemorates the pilgrims’ celebration of their first harvest in 1621, when they invited some of their Native American neighbors to join in the feast. They thanked their “beneficent father” for the food they believed he bestowed upon them — which is where the religious component comes into play — and since they are considered the first Europeans to have successfully colonized the "New World,” the holiday is also closely tied to the founding of our nation.

For generations, Thanksgiving has been a day on which family and friends both near and far have gathered together to share a meal and express gratitude for everything good they’ve experienced in the past year. The feast has traditionally been held at home and prepared by the host(s), though sometimes guests bring side dishes to lessen the workload. That has changed in recent years, however; since the average American dines out more now, some families have broken with the at-home tradition and have joined their family and friends at a restaurant for the holiday meal. This, in turn, has given way to many different types of Thanksgiving dinners across the country: from family-style, to formal, to non-traditional, there is an ever-increasing variety of options for enjoying your holiday meal.

In response to our country’s growing appetite for holiday meals out, we called on our City Guide editors and trusted contacts to find the best restaurants for dining out on Thanksgiving in five major food cities: Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington, D.C. We sifted through hundreds of recommendations, considered the sheer number and variety of offerings in each city, and determined the winners based on reviews, recommendations, and food quality. If you are a lucky resident of one of these cities, or if you’re traveling to one for turkey day, here is our guide to the best places to dine out on Thanksgiving in America.

Click here for the best restaurants for Thanksgiving dinner in Seattle
Click here for the best restaurants for Thanksgiving dinner in San Francisco
Click here for the best restaurants for Thanksgiving dinner in Los Angeles
Click here for the best restaurants for Thanksgiving dinner in New York
Click here for the best restaurants for Thanksgiving dinner in Washington, D.C.

Kate Kolenda is the Restaurant and City Guide Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @BeefWerky and @theconversant.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.


Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving &mdash when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores &mdash is once again upon us. For some, it&rsquos a day of mass media consumption, with a parade and three NFL games. For others, it&rsquos a day to identify the secret Canadians in our midst by finding out they don&rsquot have plans (Kim!). Sure, we&rsquove hit the point where the Santa Claus float at the end of the Macy&rsquos Thanksgiving Day Parade commemorates the start of the third week of Christmas music on the radio, but at least turkeys are cheap, right?

And that&rsquos what Thanksgiving is really about: food. So, in the spirit of the things that bring us all together, let&rsquos peel apart this holiday and carve this nation up into factions like a bargain-bin bird. Who eats what where? Our SurveyMonday Audience poll about Thanksgiving traditions had 1,058 respondents.

Chicken, pork and roast beef got cursory shout-outs as main Thanksgiving dishes, but turkey rules, with 82 percent of respondents saying the other, other white meat is the centerpiece of their meal. When you get past the poultry and check out the side dishes, though, the regional distinctions really come out.

Here&rsquos the most disproportionately consumed side dish in each region:

Going deeper, the Southeast is the definitive home of canned cranberry sauce respondents from the region are 50 percent more likely to pick that over the homemade variety. The Middle Atlantic states disproportionately have cauliflower as a side &mdash 17 percent in the region versus 9 percent nationwide &mdash while Texas and central Southern states see cornbread as far more necessary than the rest of the country, with 40 percent of respondents from those regions having it at dinner, compared with only 28 percent of the nation.

The Southeast prefers their carbs in the form of mac and cheese &mdash 35 percent of respondents in that region include the dish on their Thanksgiving menu versus 20 percent of the country overall. Meanwhile, New England is losing its mind over squash, with 56 percent demanding it on their table, compared with only 18 percent of the nation as a whole. This is, by far, the most confusing finding of this whole pursuit. Did Gronk endorse squash or something?

What about dessert? Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West).

Still, after dessert, the nation unites around that most American of traditions: buying shit. With little variation among regions, a solid 23 percent of respondents said they would shop Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving Day, a great way to leave the family behind a little early.

Another way to ditch the party early: leave after dinner to hang out with high school friends. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they&rsquove done that. So it might be worth checking out Facebook ahead of time to see which of your old associates don&rsquot have kids yet. I know I&rsquoll be doing that, and I&rsquoll see you at that bar that didn&rsquot card when we were 19.