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7 Oktoberfest Beers to Drink At Home Slideshow

7 Oktoberfest Beers to Drink At Home Slideshow

Weihenstephaner Festbier

You can’t get much more Oktoberfest than this: Although the brewery is located outside of Munich (and therefore isn’t the official sanctioned beer of the German fest), it's close enough. The oldest brewery recognized, Weihenstephaner was licensed to brew in 1040 but was making beer even as far back as the year 768. What to expect from the Festbier? A traditional Bavarian brew. It has a toasted malt backbone, notes Draft magazine, but also has that crisp lager finish everyone loves.

Warsteiner Premium Oktoberfest

Jane Bruce

This Märzen-style beer comes from Germanys largest, privately owned brewery. It has a grassy hops aroma that comes on strong, with a slight floral and apple smell, but a crisp finish that makes it very drinkable.

Gordon Biersch Weizeneisbock

This limited-supply Oktoberfest was actually a bit of a historical mistake: legend has it that in the 19th century, a (lazy) brewer at the Kulmbach Brewery in Germany "accidentally" left kegs of bock outside during a cold winter day. The cold temperature outside was so cold that it froze the water out of the beer. Sounds crazy? It had a pretty good effect: it concentrated the brew inside and made the flavor that much more intense. Today, the Gordon Biersch Brewing Company in California makes the beer by recreating the same frozen temperatures; water is frozen out of the beer during the aging process, which gives it that high 10 percent ABV. Using traditional Bavarian hops and yeast, this beer is a true toast to Germanys history of brewing.

Altenmünster Oktoberfest Beer

Jane Bruce

Another traditional Germany beer; the brewers at Allguer Brauhaus use clear spring water from the region, plus Hallertau hops. Its a full-bodied brew, with tastes of biscuits and caramel and just a hint of grassy hops, says World Class Beer.

Magic Hat Hex Ourtoberfest

Magic Hat takes the typical Oktoberfest lager and mixes it up: the amber ale isnt quite the same as an Oktoberfest brew, but has the same malty, toasty characteristics. Made with cherry-wood-smoked malts among others, its a sweeter seasonal than most Oktoberfest beers. The result? A smoked cherry finish that balances the hops, notes Worlds Finest Beverage.

Saranac Oktoberfest

The German lager uses Saaz and Tettnang hops, making it an extra tangy brew. The Brew Site notes that its bright copper color is nothing next to the toasted, toffee tasting notes. Its a malt-heavy brew, but the hops balances out the sweetness.

Samuel Adams Oktoberfest

You cant not mention the Samuel Adams Oktoberfest brew, especially when its being stirred into Red Robin Oktoberfest milkshakes across the country. Whats the secret? Bitterness from Bavarian Noble hops, five roasts of malts, and caramel and toffee notes. And the beer won the Worlds Best Mrzen brew in the World Beer Awards in 2008.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


IPAs to Pilsners: The best beer of every type

In 1956, archaeologists working in northern Israel’s Raqefet Cave—once home to the Natufian people (13,050–7,550 B.C.)—stumbled upon an astonishing discovery: 13,000-year-old fermented gruel. Archaeologists had found prehistoric evidence of beer before in the remnants of ancient brewing that have surfaced in China, Mesopotamia, and North Africa. But this was the oldest—and it was the oldest to a great extent. The beer residue—a thin gruel-type beer—found in Raqefet Cave precedes other archaeological evidence by at least 5,000 years.

For as long as humans have farmed cereals like wheat, barley, and rice, humans have fermented at least some of it into beer. The Mesopotamians produced beer from bread and documented its ritual consumption on stone tablets. Ancient Egyptians, who recorded the world’s first beer recipe on papyrus scrolls, drank it during religious ceremonies. The Nubian culture in the central Nile River Valley used beer as an antibiotic. In 2,100 B.C., Babylonian King Hammurabi enshrined regulations for tavern keepers and brewers in his famous Code of Hammurabi. Beer became so inextricably linked to the ancient grain-growing civilizations of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa that the Greek writer Sophocles (450 B.C.) considered beer, alongside vegetables, meat, and bread, to be a vital component of a healthy diet. (In an era when the average Greek lived about 35 years, Sophocles, it should be noted, lived to the ripe age of 90.)

Fast forward many centuries and beer production is now an exacting science comprising complex flavor profiles, exotic additives, carefully measured formulas, and humongous sterilized stainless-steel vats. Gone is the thick, syrupy brew favored by Germanic tribes and disdained by Ancient Romans. Instead, breweries nowadays turn out flavorful, easy-drinking beers. Long evolved from the Natufians' fermented gruel, modern beer satisfies a range of tastes for a global market.

Beer styles are distinguished by three key factors: color (pale to dark), hoppy bitterness (0 to 100 International Bitterness Units, or IBU), and alcohol content (3% to 20% alcohol by volume). From classic to cultured bacteria, Stacker identified 35 different styles and used BeerAdvocate’s sweeping database of craft brews to determine the best individual beers among them. The ratings and rankings are accurate as of March 2021.

From Canada to Belgium, read on to find the best beers of every style, then go out and make old Sophocles proud.


Watch the video: The Best Beers of Oktoberfest 2020 Part 22 (December 2021).