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Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe

Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe

Executive Chef Phil Conlon of Columbus Tavern in New York City Shares His Favorite Version of Corned Beef and Cabbage

Ingredients

For the whole mustard sauce:

  • 1 quart chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons whole grain mustard
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon honey

For the beef:

  • 2 pounds beef brisket
  • 4 ounces sugar
  • 4 ounces salt
  • 1 teaspoon chile flakes
  • 1 teaspoon juniper berries
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seed
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seed
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • ½ tablespoon pink curing salt
  • 1 gallon water
  • 2 quarts chicken stock
  • 4 whole carrots
  • 4 thyme sprigs
  • 2 bay leaves

For the potatoes:

  • 1 pound red bliss potatoes, scrubbed
  • 4 shallots, peeled and chopped rough
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped rough
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 1 bay leaf

For the cabbage:

  • 1 head of Napa cabbage, cut in half and quartered, stems intact
  • 2 cups white wine
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 1 bay leaf

Directions

For the whole mustard sauce:

Place all ingredients into a pot and reduce until thick sauce like consistency.

For the beef:

Place beef brisket and the next 11 ingredients in a large container. Place a towel over the beef to submerge it and let sit for 5 days and rotate every day. Take brisket out, rinse it briefly and cook in a large pot with the chicken stock, carrots, bay leaf, and thyme. Bring to a boil and then place at a simmer for 20-30 minutes.

For the potatoes:

Boil red bliss potatoes with shallots, garlic, thyme, rosemary, and bay leaf until fork tender.

For the cabbage:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Place all ingredients into a baking pan and cover with aluminum foil and cook in oven for 45 minutes until tender.


Corned Beef Cabbage Recipe

Irish-Americans and lots of other people eat Corned Beef Cabbage on St Pats Day , as a nostalgic reminder of their Irish heritage or in support of the Irish culture and spirit. They also prepare it because it’s delicious.

Corning" is a form of curing. It has nothing to do with corn. J

In the days before refrigeration, meat was dry-cured in coarse "corns" of salt.

The salt, some the size of kernels of corn, were rubbed into the beef to keep it from spoiling and to preserve it.

Today brining -- the use of salt water -- has replaced the dry salt cure, but the name "corned beef" is still used, rather than "brined" or "pickled" beef.

Commonly used spices that give corned beef its distinctive flavor are peppercorns and bay leaf. Of course, these spices may vary regionally.

Corned beef and cabbage, I hate to say, is really not a traditional Irish meal. North Americans adopted this meal as an "official" meal to help celebrate Saint Pats Day. How that came about can be discovered by reading the suggested menu page for Saint Patrick’s Day.

Whether you are interested in Corned Beef and Cabbage because of Saint Pats Day or you just happen to like corned beef, you've come to the right place. This recipe is a favorite restaurant recipe.


Reviews ( 4 )

Corned Beef Ingredients PICKLING SPICE: 2 tablespoons mustard seeds 2 tablespoons coriander seeds 1 tablespoon black peppercorns 1 tablespoon whole allspice 1 tablespoon whole cloves 8 whole cardamom pods 2 cinnamon sticks, broken into pieces 4 bay leaves, crumbled 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper (optional) BRINE: 1 gallon water 2 cups kosher salt 1 tablespoon pink curing salt 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 1 recipe Pickling Spice (above) CORNED BEEF: 1 3 1/2 pound flat cut beef brisket 1 medium head cabbage, cut into wedges 1 onion, coarsely chopped 4 carrots, cut into 2-inch chunks Directions PICKLING SPICE In a small bowl combine all ingredients. Set aside. BRINE: In a large pot combine the water, kosher and pink salts, garlic, brown sugar, and 1/4 cup Pickling Spice. Bring to a simmer, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat. Let stand until room temperature. Transfer to a 2-gal. resealable plastic bag set in a large shallow pan. CORNED BEEF: Place brisket in bag seal. Chill 5 days, turning occasionally. Remove brisket from brine rinse thoroughly. Transfer to an 8- to 10-qt. pot. Cover with fresh water. Place remaining Pickling Spice on a double-thick 8-inch square of 100% cotton cheesecloth. Bring up corners tie with 100% cotton string. Add to pot with beef. Bring to boiling reduce heat to low. Simmer, covered, 3 hours or until brisket is fork tender, adding cabbage, onion, and carrots the last 15 minutes. Remove spice bag discard. Thinly slice corned beef. Serve with cabbage, onion, and carrots. From the Test Kitchen CORNED BEEF SANDWICH MELT: Spread inside of marble rye bread slices with Dijon-style mustard and thousand island dressing. Add sliced corned beef, shredded fontina cheese, and Pickled Onions*. Spread outside of sandwich with butter and cook in a skillet over medium heat until toasted, turning once. *Pickled Onions: In a medium saucepan place 1 cup of the corned beef cooking liquid, 1/2 cup cider vinegar, and 1 tablespoon sugar. Bring to boiling. Place 1 red onion, thinly sliced, in a medium heatproof bowl. Pour vinegar mixture over onions. Let stand at least 1 hour. Drain before using. Nutrition analysis per serving: 682 calories, 31 g protein, 40 g carbohydrate, 45 g total fat (24 g sat. fat), 153 mg cholesterol, 2 g fiber, 5 g total sugar, 20% Vitamin A, 2% Vitamin C, 1946 mg sodium, 14% calcium, 11% iron


Corned Beef and Cabbage

Tender meat and tangy cabbage shine in this traditional St. Patrick's Day dish.

package corned beef brisket (3 to 4 pounds)

head green cabbage (or 2 if you'd like more)

Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste

bottle Guinness, or any beer

  1. For the corned beef: Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Unwrap the brisket and place it fat side up inside a baking dish. If it came with a spice packet, sprinkle it over the top, then sprinkle on the black pepper and rub it in. Cover the dish with heavy aluminum foil and place it in the oven for 2 1/2 hours, then uncover and continue baking for 30 to 45 minutes.
  3. Check the brisket by inserting a fork in the meat. If it goes in easily, it&rsquos ready if it meets with resistance, bake for another 30 minutes&mdash or up to an hour in some cases! If the brisket is tough, it hasn't cooked long enough! Once the brisket is fork-tender, remove it from the oven and let it rest, covered loosely in foil.
  4. While the brisket is resting, make the balsamic reduction: Combine the balsamic and the sugar in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir it together and bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce to medium-low and simmer until the mixture is thick and reduced by half. Set it aside.
  5. Next, make the cabbage: Raise the oven temperature to 350 degrees. Cut the cabbage into 8 wedges. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat and add the cabbage. Sear it on both sides until the cabbage gets as much color as possible, about 1 minute per side. Use a spatula to transfer the cabbage to a rack placed over a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle the cabbage pieces with salt and pepper. Pour the Guinness into the bottom of the baking sheet, then carefully transfer the pan to the oven. (The beer will gently steam the cabbage and infuse it with stouty essence). Bake the cabbage for 20 minutes, or until tender and deeper brown.
  6. To serve: Slice or shred the rested beef on a cutting board (it should be very, very tender and almost falling apart). Then place it on a large platter alongside the cabbage wedges. Drizzle generous spoonfuls of the balsamic reduction all over the cabbage slices.

Variations: Serve with a dish of grainy mustard. Serve with boiled new potatoes. Shred the corned beef with two forks if you prefer that consistency! Make a leftover corned beef sandwich with a slice of brisket and a wedge of cabbage on rye.

Before I start with this St. Patrick&rsquos Day dish, I have a funny and touching corned beef story to share with you. Early in my marriage, I decided I wanted to try to make my mom&rsquos classic beef brisket, which is marinated in all sorts of savory (salty) ingredients. So I sauntered down to the grocery store, bought one of those brisket things, took it home, and marinated it in things like beef consomme and soy sauce for a good 18 hours before putting in the oven for another 7. And when my husband and I took our first bite of that lovely, tender meat, well&hellipwe spit it out and gagged.

Turns out, I&rsquod bought a corned beef brisket instead.

Note to self: Corned beef brisket does not need to be marinated in savory ingredients.

SALT OVERDOSE! BLECH! YUCK! GAG! BAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRF!

Awwww&hellipwasn&rsquot that a sweet story?

Anyway, corned beef and cabbage is probably the most traditional Irish-American St. Paddy&rsquos Day dish there is. But you know what? For a traditional holiday dish, there sure are a lot of different ways to spin it. The corned beef can be shredded, shaved, or sliced. The cabbage can be shredded, wedged, or chunked. The brisket can be boiled, braised, or roasted. The beef and cabbage can be slow cooked together, or they can be kept separate.

Here&rsquos how I like to make the recipe.

First and foremost: I use corned beef in the package, because no one in their right mind would ever take the time to salt-cure their own corned beef because that process takes a week to ten days and whole nations have been built in that time. The stuff in the package is lovely!

But that&rsquos kind of the whole point.

Unwrap the brisket and place it fat side up inside the baking dish. If it came with a spice packet, sprinkle it over the top if you want to (or you can just discard the packet), then sprinkle on the black pepper and rub it in.

Cover the dish with heavy aluminum foil and place it in a 325 degree oven for 2 1/2 hours, then remove the foil and bake it for at least another 30 to 45 minutes. This long cooking time is absolutely essential, because if the meat doesn&rsquot cook for a long enough time, it&rsquoll be tough and tragic. And that&rsquos the key to tough cuts of meat like brisket: If they&rsquore tough, they haven&rsquot cooked long enough! (As opposed to good cuts of steak, which have cooked way too long and must be driven from this earth if they&rsquore tough.)

Check the brisket by inserting a fork in the meat after 3 hours. If it goes in really easily, it&rsquos ready if it meets with any resistance at all, bake it for another 30 minutes or so. You may have to keep doing this&mdashchecking it and putting it back in the oven&mdashfor up to an hour and a half longer! If the brisket is tough, it hasn&rsquot cooked long enough.

Once the brisket is fork-tender, remove it from the oven and let it rest, covered loosely in foil.

IMPORTANT: IF THE BRISKET IS TOUGH, IT HAS NOT COOKED LONG ENOUGH. BRISKET NEEDS A LONG COOKING TIME IN LOW HEAT SO THE CONNECTIVE TISSUES WILL DISSOLVE. JUST PUT IT BACK IN THE OVEN FOR 30 TO 45 MINUTES, THEN CHECK IT AGAIN!

While the brisket is resting, make a balsamic reduction for the cabbage: Combine balsamic vinegar with a little sugar in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir it together and bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce to medium-low and simmer until the mixture is reduced by half and is nice and thick. Your whole house will smell like balsamic vinegar and your kids will run out of the house, but that can sometimes be a good thing if you need a little peace and quiet. Set the balsamic reduction aside until you need it.

(Note: I borrowed the above photo from another post of mine since I&rsquom an airhead and didn&rsquot take a photo of this step when I made the corned beef and cabbage.)

Next, raise the oven temperature to 350 degrees and start on the cabbage! Cut a head of cabbage (or 2 heads if you want more cabbage) into quarters&hellip

Then cut each fourth in half to create 8 thin wedges. If there are obnoxiously large chunks of the core visible, you can slice them off, but the core actually helps hold the wedges together, so don&rsquot go too crazy with the knife.

Heat a little olive oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium-high to high heat and add a few pieces of the cabbage.

Sear it on both sides until the cabbage gets as much gorgeous color as possible, about 1 minute per side.

Use a spatula to transfer the cabbage to a rack placed over a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle the cabbage pieces with salt and pepper, and repeat until all the cabbage is seared.

Now, just for kicks, pour a little Guinness (or any beer) into the bottom of the pan, then carefully transfer the pan to the oven.

Bake the cabbage for 20 minutes, or until tender and deeper brown. In my mind, the Guinness gently steams the cabbage and infuses it with its stout-y essence.

But in reality, it&rsquos probably just a placebo effect.

Which is totally fine by me!

Transfer it to a cutting board and slice or shred it up (I prefer slices in this scenario). You can go thick with the slices, as I did, or you can use a very sharp knife and go super thin.

Arrange the corned beef and cabbage on a platter together&hellip

Take generous spoonfuls of the balsamic reduction&hellip

All over the cabbage slices. (And you can drizzle some on the meat, too!)

Tender meat, tangy cabbage&hellipthis really is a feast for the senses and a great way to celebrate St. Paddy&rsquos Day!

And here are some fun variations:

Serve with a dish of grainy Irish mustard.
Serve with boiled new potatoes.
Shred the corned beef with two forks if you prefer that consistency!
Make a leftover corned beef sandwich with a slice of brisket and a wedge of cabbage on rye. Yum!


Beer-Braised Corned Beef with Vegetables

Corned beef, perhaps the dish most firmly associated with St. Patrick’s Day—and Ireland in general—is beef that has been cured using large grains (or “corns”) of salt, among other ingredients. This version prepared in a slow cooker is a stick-to-your-ribs dish that’s ideal for a St. Paddy’s celebration, especially when it’s paired with thick slices of warm rye bread and pints of ale. Corned beef can be found at many grocery stores and ordered from your butcher, but you can make your own if you plan ahead: In a bowl, stir together 8 cups (64 fl. oz./2 l) water, 1 1/2 cups (7 oz./220 g) kosher salt, 1/2 cup (4 oz./125 g) sugar, 3 Tbs. pickling spices and 3 crushed garlic cloves until the salt and sugar are dissolved. Submerge a brisket in the mixture, cover and refrigerate for 5 to 8 days. Rinse the brisket under cold water before proceeding with the recipe.

Beer-Braised Corned Beef with Vegetables

Ingredients

  • 1 point-cut corned beef brisket with juices and enclosed spice packet, about 3 lb. (1.5 kg)
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 1/3 cup (2 oz./60 g) drained sauerkraut
  • 1/4 cup (2 oz./60 g) prepared yellow mustard
  • 1 Tbs. golden brown sugar
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups (12 fl. oz./375 ml) brown or red ale
  • 1 cup (8 fl. oz./250 ml) low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 lb. (750 g) small yellow or white potatoes, halved or quartered if large
  • 4 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch (5-cm) lengths
  • 1 small green cabbage, cut into 6 to 8 wedges through the stem end

1. Put the brisket and juices and the contents of the spice packet in a slow-cooker insert. Add the onion, sauerkraut, mustard, sugar, 1 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper and mix well with your hands. Pour in the beer and broth.

2. Transfer the insert to the slow cooker, cover and cook on low for 6 hours. The brisket and vegetables should be very tender.

3.Uncover and add the potatoes, carrots and cabbage wedges, submerging them in the liquid. Re-cover and continue to cook on low for 2 hours. The vegetables and brisket should be very tender.

4. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board. Tent with aluminum foil and let rest for 5 minutes. Using a large, sharp knife, cut the brisket across the grain into thin slices. If you wish to serve the braising liquid, using a large spoon, skim off and discard as much fat as possible from the surface of the liquid.

5. Divide the sliced corned beef and vegetables among 4 plates.

6. If desired, spoon some of the warm braising liquid over each serving. Serve immediately. Serves 6 to 8.

Learn to make the most of your slow cooker with this and other inspiring recipes in our Quick Slow Cooking , by Kim Laidlaw.


Steamed corned beef and cabbage

If you make corned beef every year for St. Patrick’s Day, chances are good that you boil it with the spices that often come with the meat. But there’s more than one way to cook corned beef.

Steaming works especially well with a fatty cut of meat like corned beef because the steam actually melts the fat, so some of it drips off during steaming.

We put a corned beef brisket in a steamer basket lined with cabbage leaves. We did not use the spice packet that came with the corned beef, or any seasonings in fact only the cabbage. Our 3 1/2-pound brisket took about three hours to cook tender, but it came out full of flavor.

When we trimmed the fat off the top and sliced it, it felt firm but was tender and juicy. It did not fall apart and lacked the stringiness common in boiled beef.

Cabbage wedges and small whole carrots were added in a steamer basket above the corned beef during the last 30 minutes of cooking, so their juices would drip down on the meat. The cabbage had an amazing flavor, sweet and almost delicate. A few of us tried the cabbage that had lined the steaming basket it was very limp but had acquired a wonderful flavor from the corned beef juices.


This Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe Will Complete Your St. Patrick's Day Menu

Best served with a glass of Guinness (or green beer!).

Before you dig into your St. Patrick's Day treats, fill up on this St. Paddy's meal. Corned beef and cabbage is as classic as it gets: When Irish immigrants first came to America, they relied on this dish. They chose corned beef &mdash a type of salt-cured brisket &mdash and cabbage because it was a cheap and nutritious way to feed their families. While corned beef wasn't necessarily common in Ireland, it was the closest alternative to bacon, which was expensive in America at the time.

Today, Americans eat this hearty meal on St. Patrick's Day to celebrate their Irish ancestors. Our updated version features seared green cabbage, which gets caramelized in the pan and makes for the ultimate accompaniment to tender braised corned beef. Opt for this elegant dish instead of stewing cabbage and root veggies, like potatoes and carrots, for hours, which risks losing the flavor of the vegetables. You could serve this corned beef and cabbage for a dinner party, and save the leftovers, if you have any, to turn them into an amazing hash for breakfast on March 18th.


Ingredients

  • 1 package ButcherBox Corned Beef Brisket
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 pound red potatoes halved or quartered depending on size
  • 5 carrots peeled and cut into thirds
  • 1 head cabbage quartered

Instructions

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Emilie Abijanac

Emilie Abijanac is the Culinary Director for ButcherBox. She is a graduate of New England Culinary Institute with over 20 years of catering experience in Boston. Emilie was the Sous Chef for East Meets West Catering and has worked with Kate’s Table and La Fête.


Get the Complete (Printable) Oven Baked Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe Below. Enjoy!

Cover the top of the pan tightly with foil. Bake in the preheat oven for 2 hours.

When the corned beef is almost done, prepare the vegetables: Cut the cabbage in half and remove the core, and then cut each half into 4 wedges. Peel the onion and cut into wedges. Trim and peel the carrots, and then cut them into 2-3 inch segments.

When the corned beef comes out of the oven, increase the temperature to 350 degrees F. Place the garlic cloves in the roasting pan juices. Then arrange the cabbage, onion, carrots, and potatoes around the brisket.

Spoon some of the pan juices over the vegetables. Then place the corned beef back in the oven and bake for 30 minutes, uncovered. Spoon more broth over the veggies and bake for another 30 minutes, or until the largest carrots and potatoes are fork-tender.