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Egyptian Mummy Toes recipe

Egyptian Mummy Toes recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Pork

This is the perfect finger food for any Halloween dinner party. They are strategically squirted with ketchup (for blood) and mustard (for infection).

7 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 450g cocktail sausages
  • 12 flour tortillas
  • cocktail sticks
  • 4 tablespoons ketchup, for garnish
  • 4 tablespoons mustard, for garnish

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:30min

  1. Preheat an oven to 190 C / Gas 5. Line a baking tray with foil.
  2. Make a small slit into one end of each cocktail sausage to resemble a toenail.
  3. Cut the tortillas into strips 10cm long by 2.5cm wide and place onto a microwave safe plate. Cook the tortillas in the microwave a few seconds until pliable.
  4. Wrap each sausage with a strip of tortilla and secure with a cocktail stick. Make sure the toenail side is sticking out. Place the mummy toes onto the prepared baking tray.
  5. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly.
  6. Place a squirt of ketchup or mustard where the wedge is to resemble a bloody toenail or of course an infected toenail. Serve to unsuspecting guests.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(7)

Reviews in English (5)

by pixie

These were soo easy to make and very cute! Looked like real toes! I took them to a halloween potluck for my husbands unit and they went so fast i didn't even get to try one!! I even won the best dish contest and my husband gets a 3 day weekend!! I used corn tortillas because i didn't have flour and they worked great, i think it gave them more flavor! I also soaked the toothpicks in water so they didn't burn! I will def make them again!-19 Oct 2009

by The Bunny Chef

I changed this slightly to make Mummy Fingers because I wanted to make them for dinner rather than as an appetizer. I used hot dogs and cut small flour tortillas in half, sprinkled the tortilla halves with cheese, then rolled them up with a hot dog in the center. Secured with toothpicks and baked. When they were out of the oven I took out the toothpicks and the melted cheese held the "bandages" down. I think they turned out really cute and were a fun, spooky, quick dinner for Halloween.-01 Nov 2010

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Ancient Egyptian Foods and Recipes

The history of ancient Egyptians is always included in school curriculums. Here's information on the diet of the ancient Egyptians.

Many people are surprised to find that a few of the foods ancient Egyptians consumed are still being eaten today! For example, ful medammes, a fava bean dish that is often a breakfast food, is now the National Dish of Egypt and was eaten in the Pharaonic periods. Hummus was also served in ancient Egypt as well.

What the ancient Egyptians ate varied depending on their social and financial status. The more money and power you had, the better you ate.


Prehistoric mummy reveals ancient Egyptian embalming 'recipe' was around for millennia

It is the first time that extensive tests have been carried out on an intact prehistoric mummy, consolidating the researchers' previous findings that embalming was taking place 1,500 years earlier than previously accepted.

Dating from c.3700-3500 BC, the mummy has been housed in the Egyptian Museum in Turin since 1901, but unlike the majority of other prehistoric mummies in museums, it has never undergone any conservation treatments, providing a unique opportunity for accurate scientific analysis.

Like its famous counterpart Gebelein Man A in the British Museum, the Turin mummy was previously assumed to have been naturally mummified by the desiccating action of the hot, dry desert sand.

Using chemical analysis, the scientific team led by the Universities of York and Macquarie uncovered evidence that the mummy had in fact undergone an embalming process, with a plant oil, heated conifer resin, an aromatic plant extract and a plant gum/sugar mixed together and used to impregnate the funerary textiles in which the body was wrapped.

This 'recipe' contained antibacterial agents, used in similar proportions to those employed by the Egyptian embalmers when their skill was at its peak some 2,500 years later.

The study builds on the previous research from 2014 which first identified the presence of complex embalming agents in surviving fragments of linen wrappings from prehistoric bodies in now obliterated tombs at Mostagedda in Middle Egypt.

The team, which includes researchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie, Oxford, Warwick, Trento and Turin, highlight the fact that the mummy came from Upper (southern) Egypt, which offers the first indication that the embalming recipe was being used over a wider geographical area at a time when the concept of a pan-Egyptian identity was supposedly still developing.

Archaeological chemist and mummification expert, Dr Stephen Buckley, from the University of York's BioArCh facility, said: "Having identified very similar embalming recipes in our previous research on prehistoric burials, this latest study provides both the first evidence for the wider geographical use of these balms and the first ever unequivocal scientific evidence for the use of embalming on an intact, prehistoric Egyptian mummy.

"Moreover, this preservative treatment contained antibacterial constituents in the same proportions as those used in later 'true' mummification. As such, our findings represent the literal embodiment of the forerunners of classic mummification, which would become one of the central and iconic pillars of ancient Egyptian culture."

Dr Jana Jones, Egyptologist and expert on ancient Egyptian burial practices from Macquarie University, said: "The examination of the Turin body makes a momentous contribution to our limited knowledge of the prehistoric period and the expansion of early mummification practices as well as providing vital, new information on this particular mummy.

"By combining chemical analysis with visual examination of the body, genetic investigations, radiocarbon dating and microscopic analysis of the linen wrappings, we confirmed that this ritual mummification process took place around 3600 BC on a male, aged between 20 and 30 years when he died."

Professor Tom Higham, Deputy Director Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, said: "There are very few mummies of this 'natural' type available for analysis. Our radiocarbon dating shows it dates to the early Naqada phase of Egyptian prehistory, substantially earlier than the classic Pharaonic period, and this early age offers us an unparalleled glimpse into funerary treatment before the rise of the state.

"The results change significantly our understanding of the development of mummification and the use of embalming agents and demonstrate the power of interdisciplinary science in understanding the past."

The study, A prehistoric Egyptian mummy: evidence for an 'embalming recipe' and the evolution of early formative funerary treatments, is published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.


Ladies' Fingers and Men's Toes

Place a small amount of food coloring, if using, in a shallow bowl, and, using a paintbrush, color the rounded side of each split almond set aside to dry.

Pour 2 cups water into the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough-hook attachment. Add sugar stir to dissolve. Sprinkle with yeast, and let stand until yeast begins to bubble, about 5 minutes. Beat in 1 cup flour into yeast on low speed until combined. Beat in coarse salt add 3 1/2 cups flour, and beat until combined. Continue beating until dough pulls away from bowl, 1 to 2 minutes. Add 1/2 cup flour. Beat 1 minute more. If dough is sticky, add up to 1 cup more flour. Transfer to a lightly floured surface knead until smooth, 1 minute.

Coat a large bowl with cooking spray. Transfer dough to bowl, turning dough to coat with oil. Cover with plastic wrap let rest in a warm spot to rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Bring 3 quarts water to a boil in a 6-quart straight-sided saucepan over high heat reduce to a simmer. Add baking soda. Lightly coat two baking sheets with cooking spray. Divide dough into quarters. Work with one quarter at a time, and cover remaining dough with plastic wrap. Divide first quarter into 12 pieces. On a lightly floured work surface, roll each piece back and forth with your palm forming a long finger shape, about 3 to 4 inches. Pinch dough in two places to form knuckles. Or, to make toes, roll each piece so that it is slightly shorter and fatter, about 2 inches. Pinch in 1 place to form the knuckle. When 12 fingers or toes are formed, transfer to simmering water. Poach for 1 minute. Using a slotted spoon, transfer fingers to the prepared baking sheets. Repeat with remaining dough, blanching each set of 12 fingers or toes before making more.

Beat egg with 1 tablespoon water. Brush pretzel fingers and toes with the egg wash. Using a sharp knife, lightly score each knuckle about three times. Sprinkle with sea salt and rosemary, if using. Position almond nails, pushing them into dough to attach. Bake until golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool on wire rack.


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Ancient Egyptian Mummy ‘Older Than The Pharaohs’ Holds Secret To Ancient Embalming Recipe

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There’s a Mummy in the Egyptian Museum of Turin called ‘Fred’ that has now changed everything we thought we knew about the Ancient Egyptian embalming process.

It also shows that mummies were embalmed 1,500 years earlier than previously thought, meaning that Fred practically predates Egyptian Pharaohs.

The ancient Mummy has remained untouched by modern chemical s for thousands of years and has not been studied previously by experts.

That’s until researchers from the United Kingdom decided to give ‘Fred’ a closer look, and boy were they in for a surprise or two. Scientists discovered what they believe is the ‘original’ recipe used do embalm mummies in ancient Egypt. The mummy was previously thought to have been naturally preserved by desert conditions at the site where it was buried.

Scientists performed multiple chemical analysis on the mummy which is believed to be at least 5,600 years old to decipher the formula.

Image Credit: Dr. Stephen Buckley / University of New York.

The Recipe of All Embalming Recipes

Researchers basically discovered the chemical fingerprint of every single ingredient used by the ancient Egyptians more than 5,600 years ago. The basic recipe say experts was:

  • a plant oil – possibly sesame oil
  • a “balsam-type” plant or root extract that may have come from bullrushes
  • a plant-based gum – a natural sugar that may have been extracted from acacia
  • crucially, a conifer tree resin, which was probably pine resin

Dr. Jana Jones, Egyptologist and expert on ancient Egyptian burial practices from Macquarie University, said: “The examination of the Turin body makes a momentous contribution to our limited knowledge of the prehistoric period and the expansion of early mummification practices as well as providing vital, new information on this particular mummy.

“By combining chemical analysis with a visual examination of the body, genetic investigations, radiocarbon dating and microscopic analysis of the linen wrappings, we confirmed that this ritual mummification process took place around 3600 BC on a male, aged between 20 and 30 years when he died.”

Scientists explain that when mixed into the oil, the resin would give the mummy antibacterial properties allowing it to be preserved and protecting the body from decay.

Ancient Egyptian mummification 'recipe' revealed, new findings published in the Journal of Archaeological Science!https://t.co/byQum1lcUQ

&mdash Elsevier Archaeology (@ElsevierArchaeo) August 17, 2018

“Until now,” study author and University of York archaeologist Stephen Buckley said to the BBC, “we’ve not had a prehistoric mummy that has actually demonstrated—so perfectly through the chemistry—the origins of what would become the iconic mummification that we know all about.”

Interestingly, as reported by National Geographic, the recently discovered recipe is quite similar to the one used 2,500 after when King Tut and other Pharaohs were prepared for the afterlife.

Archaeological chemist and mummification expert, Dr Stephen Buckley, from the University of York’s BioArCh facility, said: “Having identified very similar embalming recipes in our previous research on prehistoric burials, this latest study provides both the first evidence for the wider geographical use of these balms and the first ever unequivocal scientific evidence for the use of embalming on an intact, prehistoric Egyptian mummy.

“Moreover, this preservative treatment contained antibacterial constituents in the same proportions as those used in later ‘true’ mummification. As such, our findings represent the literal embodiment of the forerunners of classic mummification, which would become one of the central and iconic pillars of ancient Egyptian culture.”


Want to make an Egyptian mummy? Here's the oldest known recipe for that

To embalm the face, one must coat a piece of red linen in an aromatic mixture and encase the person's face in it at four-day intervals.

Are modern burial rituals too mundane for you? Fancy something more extravagant with a nod to the customs of old?

Look no further. Researchers have uncovered what may be the oldest mummification recipe, hidden inside a 35,000-year-old papyrus.

Two parts of the papyrus — called Papyrus Louvre-Carlsberg manuscript — are located in the Louvre Museum in Paris and in the Papyrus Carlsberg Collection at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

Before finding this text, experts had to content themselves with only two other ancient manuals on mummification.

The latest discovery, according to Sophie Schiødt, an egyptologist from the University of Copenhagen, is much more detailed and includes never-before seen descriptions of embalming techniques, as well as a list of needed ingredients.

“The text reads like a memory aid, so the intended readers must have been specialists who needed to be reminded of these details, such as unguent recipes and uses of various types of bandages,” Schiødt said in a university news release published on Feb 26.

Schiødt is currently editing the papyrus — an ancient Egyptian writing material made from the reeds of the Nile river — and plans to include it in her Phd thesis, which is yet to be published.

Among the newer details in the document is a list of instructions for embalming a dead person’s face. The manual has included a list of ingredients to concoct a remedy of largely plant-based aromatic substances and binders cooked into a liquid, which embalmers use to coat a piece of red linen. The linen is then applied to the person’s face to ‘encase it in a protective cocoon of fragrant and anti-bacterial matter.”

The process is then repeated at four-day intervals.

“The importance of the Papyrus Louvre-Carlsberg manual in reconstructing the embalming process lies in its specification of the process being divided into intervals of four, with the embalmers actively working on the mummy every four days,” the release stated.

The papyrus also includes a 70-day schedule for embalming, split into a 35-day drying period and a 35-day wrapping period, which are further divided into four-day intervals. The body is normally dried with a mixture called natron, after removing the organs and the brain, a detail which has been omitted from the text, according to Schiødt.

“A ritual procession of the mummy marked these days, celebrating the progress of restoring the deceased’s corporeal integrity, amounting to 17 processions over the course of the embalming period,” Schiødt said .

“In between the four-day intervals, the body was covered with cloth and overlaid with straw infused with aromatics to keep away insects and scavengers.”

The full text of the papyrus will be published next year, according to the news release. The six-metre long text is dated to 1450 BC, predating the other two evidences of embalming tests by more than 1,000 years.

Most of the papyrus, which is the second-longest medical papyrus uncovered from ancient Egypt, discusses herbal medicine and skin diseases. It lists the earliest known herbal treatments, and provides descriptions of the appearance, habitat, uses and religious significance of a plant and its seed, along with discourses on skin swellings, which were then seen as illnesses sent by Khonsu, the lunar god.


Egyptian mummy reveals incredible embalming 'recipe'

A mummy buried in Southern Egypt more than 5,000 years ago has revealed its grisly secrets, shedding new light on prehistoric embalming practices.

Researchers from the Universities of York, Oxford and Warwick in the U.K., Macquarie University in Australia, and the universities of Trento and Turin in Italy studied the mummy, which has been housed in the Egyptian Museum in Turin since 1901.

“It is the first time that extensive tests have been carried out on an intact prehistoric mummy,” explains the University of York, in a statement. The latest study backs up researchers' previous findings that embalming was taking place 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.

The mummy, which has been dated to around 3700 to 3500 BC, was thought to have been naturally mummified by Egypt’s hot, dry desert sand. However, scientists led by the Universities of York and Macquarie found that the mummy had actually been embalmed.

A ‘recipe’ of plant oil, heated conifer resin, an aromatic plant extract and a plant gum/sugar mixed together was used to impregnate the textiles in which the body was wrapped, according to the researchers.

Antibacterial agents were identified in the mixture. The agents were “used in similar proportions to those employed by the Egyptian embalmers when their skill was at its peak some 2,500 years later,” the scientists said.

A previous study in 2014 found complex embalming agents in linen fragments that were wrapped around bodies in a prehistoric tomb in Middle Egypt. The latest research indicates that the “embalming recipe” was used over a larger geographical area than previously thought.

“Having identified very similar embalming recipes in our previous research on prehistoric burials, this latest study provides both the first evidence for the wider geographical use of these balms and the first ever unequivocal scientific evidence for the use of embalming on an intact, prehistoric Egyptian mummy,” said archaeological chemist Dr. Stephen Buckley of the University of York.

Ancient Egypt continues to reveal its secrets. A mysterious sphinx, for example, has been discovered during roadwork in the Egyptian city of Luxor.

"By combining chemical analysis with visual examination of the body, genetic investigations, radiocarbon dating and microscopic analysis of the linen wrappings, we confirmed that this ritual mummification process took place around 3600 BC on a male, aged between 20 and 30 years when he died,” said Dr. Jana Jones, an Egyptologist at Macquarie University, in a statement.

Archaeologists recently opened a ‘cursed’ ancient black granite sarcophagus. In a separate project, experts also unearthed a 2,200-year-old gold coin depicting the ancient King Ptolemy III, an ancestor of the famed Cleopatra.

Experts in Southern Egypt recently discovered an extremely rare marble head depicting the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

Additionally, experts in Australia found the tattered remains of an ancient priestess in a 2,500-year-old Egyptian coffin that was long thought to be empty.

On the other side of the world, a rare ancient artifact depicting the famous female pharaoh Hatshepsut surfaced in the U.K. Stunning new research also claims that King Tutankhamun may have been a boy soldier, challenging the theory he was a weak and sickly youth before his mysterious death at around 18 years of age.

Experts in the U.K. also found the world’s oldest figurative tattoos on two ancient Egyptian mummies recently, one of which is the oldest tattooed female ever discovered.

Other recent finds include an ancient cemetery in Egypt with more than 40 mummies and a necklace containing a “message from the afterlife.” An ancient statue of a Nubian king with an inscription written in Egyptian hieroglyphics was also found at a Nile River temple in Sudan.

Scientists also believe that they may have found the secret of the Great Pyramid’s near-perfect alignment. Experts are also confident that they have solved the long-standing mystery of the “screaming mummy.”

In February, archaeologists announced the discovery of a 4,400-year-old tomb near the pyramids. Late last year, archaeologists also revealed that they had uncovered the graves of four children at an ancient site in Egypt.


Prehistoric mummy reveals ancient Egyptian embalming 'recipe' was around for millennia

The mummy has been housed in the Egyptian Museum in Turin since 1901. Credit: Dr Stephen Buckley, University of York

It is the first time that extensive tests have been carried out on an intact prehistoric mummy, consolidating the researchers' previous findings that embalming was taking place 1,500 years earlier than previously accepted.

Dating from c.3700-3500 BC, the mummy has been housed in the Egyptian Museum in Turin since 1901, but unlike the majority of other prehistoric mummies in museums, it has never undergone any conservation treatments, providing a unique opportunity for accurate scientific analysis.

Like its famous counterpart Gebelein Man A in the British Museum, the Turin mummy was previously assumed to have been naturally mummified by the desiccating action of the hot, dry desert sand.

Using chemical analysis, the scientific team led by the Universities of York and Macquarie uncovered evidence that the mummy had in fact undergone an embalming process, with a plant oil, heated conifer resin, an aromatic plant extract and a plant gum/sugar mixed together and used to impregnate the funerary textiles in which the body was wrapped.

This 'recipe' contained antibacterial agents, used in similar proportions to those employed by the Egyptian embalmers when their skill was at its peak some 2,500 years later.

The study builds on the previous research from 2014 which first identified the presence of complex embalming agents in surviving fragments of linen wrappings from prehistoric bodies in now obliterated tombs at Mostagedda in Middle Egypt.

The team, which includes researchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie, Oxford, Warwick, Trento and Turin, highlight the fact that the mummy came from Upper (southern) Egypt, which offers the first indication that the embalming recipe was being used over a wider geographical area at a time when the concept of a pan-Egyptian identity was supposedly still developing.

Archaeological chemist and mummification expert, Dr. Stephen Buckley, from the University of York's BioArCh facility, said: "Having identified very similar embalming recipes in our previous research on prehistoric burials, this latest study provides both the first evidence for the wider geographical use of these balms and the first ever unequivocal scientific evidence for the use of embalming on an intact, prehistoric Egyptian mummy.

"Moreover, this preservative treatment contained antibacterial constituents in the same proportions as those used in later 'true' mummification. As such, our findings represent the literal embodiment of the forerunners of classic mummification, which would become one of the central and iconic pillars of ancient Egyptian culture."

Dr. Jana Jones, Egyptologist and expert on ancient Egyptian burial practices from Macquarie University, said: "The examination of the Turin body makes a momentous contribution to our limited knowledge of the prehistoric period and the expansion of early mummification practices as well as providing vital, new information on this particular mummy.

"By combining chemical analysis with visual examination of the body, genetic investigations, radiocarbon dating and microscopic analysis of the linen wrappings, we confirmed that this ritual mummification process took place around 3600 BC on a male, aged between 20 and 30 years when he died."

Professor Tom Higham, Deputy Director Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, said: "There are very few mummies of this 'natural' type available for analysis. Our radiocarbon dating shows it dates to the early Naqada phase of Egyptian prehistory, substantially earlier than the classic Pharaonic period, and this early age offers us an unparalleled glimpse into funerary treatment before the rise of the state.

"The results change significantly our understanding of the development of mummification and the use of embalming agents and demonstrate the power of interdisciplinary science in understanding the past."

The study, A prehistoric Egyptian mummy: evidence for an 'embalming recipe' and the evolution of early formative funerary treatments, is published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.


The Secret Embalming Recipe For Ancient Egyptian Mummies Has Just Been Revealed

After examining an Egyptian mummy from 3,700-3,500 BC and putting it through a wide variety of forensic chemical tests, archaeologists have finally discovered the embalming recipe that ancient Egyptians used to preserve their dead.

According to the BBC, the mummification recipe is actually much older than archaeologists had suspected and was also used in a much wider fashion than was previously thought as well.

Dr. Stephen Buckley, who is an archaeologist at the University of York, commented that the mummy that he and his team studied "literally embodies the embalming that was at the heart of Egyptian mummification for 4,000 years."

Amazingly, Dr. Buckley and his research team have managed to discover the "fingerprint" of each and every chemical that was employed to preserve these ancient Egyptian mummies and has shared this embalming recipe in a new study.

In terms of the chemicals that were used to mummify Egypt's dead, the embalmers would need plant oil, which may have been sesame oil. They also used a "balsam-type" root extract or plant and it is very possible that these came from the bullrushes. Egyptian embalmers also used a natural sugar that was in the form of a gum that came from plants, and this may have included acacia.

Perhaps one of the most important items needed to mummify Egyptians was conifer tree resin, which archaeologists believe was most likely pine resin. Embalmers would add the resin to the oil, and after this, the resin would be able to successfully keep the body from completely decaying as the mixture was filled with plenty of antibacterial properties.

It was also discovered that the textiles they were studying at this time were estimated to be from 4,000 BC, and ancient Egyptians weren't believed to have started their embalming and mummification process at such an early date as this, according to Dr. Buckley.

To learn more about the start of Egyptian mummification, archaeologists examined a prehistoric mummy that was part of a collection at The Egyptian Museum in Turin, Italy. At no point had archaeologists ever submitted it to any kind of conservation, which means that this mummy was as pure as could be and the perfect specimen to study.

Egyptologist Jana Jones has stated that the Turin mummy was crucial to extracting a precise recipe for ancient Egyptian mummification, which was obtained after rigorous scientific tests were conducted.

As important as the embalming recipe was for these mummies, this was just one aspect of the mummification process. It was crucial that the brain and internal organs were removed from the deceased and that the body was completely dried out in salt.

Once this task was accomplished, the special embalming recipe was used and the bodies of the mummies were wrapped snugly in linen.

When contemplating the enormous effort that ancient Egyptians would have gone through to come up with the perfect mummification recipe, Dr. Buckley noted that this "mummification was at the heart of their culture. The afterlife was just a continuation of enjoying life. But they needed the body to be preserved in order for the spirit to have a place to reside."


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