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Plain and simple vanilla cake recipe

Plain and simple vanilla cake recipe

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  • Dish type
  • Cake
  • Mini cakes
  • Cupcakes
  • Vanilla cupcakes

This is the simplest cake I've ever made. I'll leave it up to you to ice or serve with fresh cream and strawberries.

3562 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 200g (7oz) sugar
  • 115g (4 oz) butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 200g (7oz) flour
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 120ml (4 fl oz) milk

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:30min ›Ready in:50min

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C (gas mark 4). Grease and flour a 23cm tin or line a bun tray with paper cases.
  2. In a medium bowl, cream together the sugar and butter. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the vanilla. Combine flour and baking powder, add to the creamed mixture and mix well. Finally stir in the milk until the mixture is smooth. Pour or spoon mixture into the prepared tin or bun cases.
  3. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes in the preheated oven. For fairy cakes, bake 20 to 25 minutes. Cake is done when it springs back to the touch.

How to ice cupcakes

Watch our How to ice cupcakes video to see how to dress them up or down for any occasion!

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(3828)

Reviews in English (3032)

FAILED pleese make it more clear what flour to use-28 Oct 2011

Hi, I am a new house husband and never baked from scratch before and wanted to suprise the family with a cake, this was soo simple to follow and i even got inventive and added cherries to it. Just waiting for it bake now.-21 Jul 2011

Took shortcuts.instead of putting the flour and baking soda in a different bowl then adding it to the creamed mixture, I sieved the flour with the bakind soda into the creamed mixture plus I used an electric whisk-16 May 2010


Basic Vanilla Cake Glaze With Flavor Variations

A basic cake glaze is the perfect icing for a tube cake, Bundt cake, or coffee cake, and so versatile that you can even drizzle it over muffins, cinnamon rolls, or quick bread. It is delicious and easy to make, calling for just confectioners' (or powdered) sugar, butter, and milk. The glaze hardens when it sets, creating a beautiful, sweet decoration that you'll use often in your baking adventures.

This recipe is very quick requiring only a few minutes of your time. By making the glaze from scratch, you can adjust the amount of milk and confectioners' sugar to create the perfect drizzling, dipping, or frosting consistency for your needs. While this basic icing is vanilla-flavored, there are several variations you can make to match whatever baked good it will glaze.

Milk or water can be used in the recipe if you use water, make sure it is hot so the glaze is not too thick. This recipe yields 2 cups, which should be enough to glaze one cake or eight individual pastries. You can easily double the recipe if needed.


Plain and simple vanilla cake recipe - Recipes

Bruno's fourth birthday was this past weekend. For months, he's been planning on whom to invite, painstakingly listing the names of his little buddies from KiTa on his adorable little fingers. Of course, ultimately, no one could come, but our sunny boy bore that with his signature good humor, which we have been leaning on so much recently that I feel almost badly about it. So we focused on the cake instead. After all, Hugo has never been particularly interested in birthday parties, much preferring to spend time thinking about which cake to request. Bruno, by contrast, couldn't have cared less about the cake, and only after much prodding by his brother and me, grudgingly gave in and said his cake it should be a yellow cake with, very important, pink and purple frosting.

Hugo was much chagrined, having hoped that his preference for a chocolate cake would be shared by his brother. But I was excited, because a couple years ago, I made the discovery of the best vanilla cake ever and I'm always thrilled to have an excuse to make it and I've been meaning to tell you all about it for, well, years. It comes from Odette Williams's book Simple Cake and is, in my mind, the very best plain yellow cake I've ever had. It's got buttermilk for a bit of tang, and quite a bit of vanilla (which is why, in the book, Odette calls it Very Vanilla Cake), and the batter, which comes together quickly with a mixer, has a gorgeous silky texture. But mostly, it's just a delight to make, as easy as easy can be.

I've made it as frosted cupcakes, as a simple round cake dusted with confectioners' sugar, baked in a tube pan and served plain, and split and filled and frosted, and it has been a slam dunk every single time. It's my forever yellow cake. I mean, I love the recipe so much that I have it taped with washi tape to the side of my fridge, an honor bestowed on only two other recipes! (One is Elise's buckwheat pancake recipe, the only pancake recipe I ever make, shall I tell you about it sometime? And the other is Diana Henry's mustard-panko baked chicken.)

This time, I baked the cake batter in an 8-inch round pan that I had lined with parchment paper. I knew I was going to cloak the whole thing with swaths of whippy frosting ultimately, so I didn't really care what the sides looked like, and the parchment-as-sling really is just so easy. But obviously, if you want neater sides, you should cut the parchment to fit the bottom as well as make a collar and also possibly use a spring form rather than a regular cake pan.

Once the cake was fully cooled, I split it in half and spread about 3/4 of a jar of storebought lemon curd on one half. You could, of course, also make your own lemon curd! But I was grateful to have the shortcut. I placed the other half back on top of the cake. Then I made frosting out of whipped cream and ricotta, only because my husband didn't buy enough whipping cream and I had ricotta that had to be used up anyway. (It was 200 ml of heavy cream and a little less than 200g of ricotta whipped together with enough confectioners' sugar to make it sweet, but not too sweet.) I really don't like buttercream very much and making a meringue frosting was just not going to happen this time (though I think it'd be perfect here, honestly!), so the whipped cream frosting was where I ended up.

I divided the cream frosting in half and tinted each batch pink and purple, then did a bit of swirly cake spackling. I will never win any beauty awards for my cake decorations, and ultimately, generously speaking, the cake looked more a cloudy sunset than anything else, but it tasted wonderful—the combination of tender cake, sweet-sour filling and whipped cream frosting worked absolutely perfectly—and everyone loved it and Bruno, our darling boy who is the cuddliest, loveliest, funniest little bunny, was happy. What more could I ask for?

Note: This post includes affiliate links and I may earn a commission if you purchase through these links, at no cost to you. I use affiliate links only for products I truly love and companies I trust. Thank you.

Plain Vanilla Cake
Makes one 8-inch/20-cm round cake
Print the recipe!

1⁄2 cup (120ml) buttermilk
2 eggs, at room temperature
1 tablespoon vanilla extract (or the scraped seeds of 1 vanilla bean)
3⁄4 cup (150g) granulated sugar
1 1⁄2 cups (195g) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1⁄4 teaspoon baking soda
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
8 tablespoons (115g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
3 tablespoons mild-flavored vegetable oil

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F/180°C. Grease an 8-inch/20-cm round pan with butter and line the bottom and sides with parchment paper. In a small bowl, whisk the eggs together. Set aside. If using the vanilla seeds, use your fingers to work the vanilla bean seeds into the sugar in a small bowl. Remove any bits of pod that may have come off with the seeds. Set aside.

2. Place the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a bowl and mix with a fork.

3. Using an electric mixer with beaters or a paddle attachment, beat the butter for 30 seconds on medium speed and then gradually add the sugar. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Continue beating on medium speed for another 4 minutes or until light in color and fluffy. If using the vanilla extract, add to the bowl and beat until combined.

4. With the mixer still on medium speed, gradually add the eggs. On low speed, add the flour mixture and then the oil and milk mix until just combined. Don’t overbeat. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.

5. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top. Bake in the center of the oven for 40-50 minutes. When a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean, and the cake bounces back when lightly pressed, remove the cake from the oven and let it stand for 10 minutes. Run a knife around the cake to gently release. Invert the cake, peel off the pieces of parchment paper and cool on a wire rack.

Comments

Bruno's fourth birthday was this past weekend. For months, he's been planning on whom to invite, painstakingly listing the names of his little buddies from KiTa on his adorable little fingers. Of course, ultimately, no one could come, but our sunny boy bore that with his signature good humor, which we have been leaning on so much recently that I feel almost badly about it. So we focused on the cake instead. After all, Hugo has never been particularly interested in birthday parties, much preferring to spend time thinking about which cake to request. Bruno, by contrast, couldn't have cared less about the cake, and only after much prodding by his brother and me, grudgingly gave in and said his cake it should be a yellow cake with, very important, pink and purple frosting.

Hugo was much chagrined, having hoped that his preference for a chocolate cake would be shared by his brother. But I was excited, because a couple years ago, I made the discovery of the best vanilla cake ever and I'm always thrilled to have an excuse to make it and I've been meaning to tell you all about it for, well, years. It comes from Odette Williams's book Simple Cake and is, in my mind, the very best plain yellow cake I've ever had. It's got buttermilk for a bit of tang, and quite a bit of vanilla (which is why, in the book, Odette calls it Very Vanilla Cake), and the batter, which comes together quickly with a mixer, has a gorgeous silky texture. But mostly, it's just a delight to make, as easy as easy can be.

I've made it as frosted cupcakes, as a simple round cake dusted with confectioners' sugar, baked in a tube pan and served plain, and split and filled and frosted, and it has been a slam dunk every single time. It's my forever yellow cake. I mean, I love the recipe so much that I have it taped with washi tape to the side of my fridge, an honor bestowed on only two other recipes! (One is Elise's buckwheat pancake recipe, the only pancake recipe I ever make, shall I tell you about it sometime? And the other is Diana Henry's mustard-panko baked chicken.)

This time, I baked the cake batter in an 8-inch round pan that I had lined with parchment paper. I knew I was going to cloak the whole thing with swaths of whippy frosting ultimately, so I didn't really care what the sides looked like, and the parchment-as-sling really is just so easy. But obviously, if you want neater sides, you should cut the parchment to fit the bottom as well as make a collar and also possibly use a spring form rather than a regular cake pan.

Once the cake was fully cooled, I split it in half and spread about 3/4 of a jar of storebought lemon curd on one half. You could, of course, also make your own lemon curd! But I was grateful to have the shortcut. I placed the other half back on top of the cake. Then I made frosting out of whipped cream and ricotta, only because my husband didn't buy enough whipping cream and I had ricotta that had to be used up anyway. (It was 200 ml of heavy cream and a little less than 200g of ricotta whipped together with enough confectioners' sugar to make it sweet, but not too sweet.) I really don't like buttercream very much and making a meringue frosting was just not going to happen this time (though I think it'd be perfect here, honestly!), so the whipped cream frosting was where I ended up.

I divided the cream frosting in half and tinted each batch pink and purple, then did a bit of swirly cake spackling. I will never win any beauty awards for my cake decorations, and ultimately, generously speaking, the cake looked more a cloudy sunset than anything else, but it tasted wonderful—the combination of tender cake, sweet-sour filling and whipped cream frosting worked absolutely perfectly—and everyone loved it and Bruno, our darling boy who is the cuddliest, loveliest, funniest little bunny, was happy. What more could I ask for?

Note: This post includes affiliate links and I may earn a commission if you purchase through these links, at no cost to you. I use affiliate links only for products I truly love and companies I trust. Thank you.

Plain Vanilla Cake
Makes one 8-inch/20-cm round cake
Print the recipe!

1⁄2 cup (120ml) buttermilk
2 eggs, at room temperature
1 tablespoon vanilla extract (or the scraped seeds of 1 vanilla bean)
3⁄4 cup (150g) granulated sugar
1 1⁄2 cups (195g) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1⁄4 teaspoon baking soda
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
8 tablespoons (115g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
3 tablespoons mild-flavored vegetable oil

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F/180°C. Grease an 8-inch/20-cm round pan with butter and line the bottom and sides with parchment paper. In a small bowl, whisk the eggs together. Set aside. If using the vanilla seeds, use your fingers to work the vanilla bean seeds into the sugar in a small bowl. Remove any bits of pod that may have come off with the seeds. Set aside.

2. Place the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a bowl and mix with a fork.

3. Using an electric mixer with beaters or a paddle attachment, beat the butter for 30 seconds on medium speed and then gradually add the sugar. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Continue beating on medium speed for another 4 minutes or until light in color and fluffy. If using the vanilla extract, add to the bowl and beat until combined.

4. With the mixer still on medium speed, gradually add the eggs. On low speed, add the flour mixture and then the oil and milk mix until just combined. Don’t overbeat. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.

5. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top. Bake in the center of the oven for 40-50 minutes. When a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean, and the cake bounces back when lightly pressed, remove the cake from the oven and let it stand for 10 minutes. Run a knife around the cake to gently release. Invert the cake, peel off the pieces of parchment paper and cool on a wire rack.


  1. Heat the oven to 180°C (gas mark 4). Lightly grease an 18cm (7in) round cake tin with a little extra butter or margarine and cut a piece of greaseproof paper or non-stick baking parchment to fit the base of the tin.
  2. Put all the ingredients into a large mixing bowl and beat with a wooden spoon or a hand-held mixer for 1 minute, or until just combined. It's important not to beat the batter too much - just long enough to make it smooth.
  3. Pour or spoon the mixture into the tin, smooth the top and bake on the middle shelf of the oven for about 45-50 minutes. The cake is cooked when it looks well risen and golden the top should spring back when lightly touched with a fingertip. Another test is to insert a skewer into the centre of the cake - it should come out clean.
  4. Let the cake sit in the tin for 5 minutes, then gently run a knife around the edge and turn it out onto a wire rack to cool. Serve dusted with icing sugar.
  • If you fantasise about being a star baker but find the whole process a little intimidating, this is the perfect easy cake for you. It's infinitely variable and incredibly simple to make. Simply place all the ingredients in a bowl and beat until combined. You can mix with a wooden spoon, a hand-held electric mixer or by using the pulse action of a food processor, for varying levels of difficulty.
  • Using margarine rather than butter works really well for this cake and saves you the bother and time of having to soften the butter before you start.
  • Don't be tempted to open the oven before 40 minutes - you'll regret it.
  • Once the cake has cooled, put it in an airtight container and it can be stored for up to 2 days.
  • See all the best recipes from the House & Garden archive.

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Plain & Simple Golden Cake

Sometimes simplicity isn't as simple as it seems. Striking the perfect balance among flavor, texture, moistness, and appearance can be quite a challenge when you're making a plain yellow cake. But when you do achieve that balance — you're golden!

This cake is light-textured and fine-grained relatively moist, given its light texture and not overly sweet, making it a good candidate for any kind of filling or frosting you desire.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups (177g) King Arthur Unbleached Cake Flour Blend*
  • 1 cup (198g) sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon salt, your preference
  • 2 tablespoons (14g) Cake Enhancer, optional for improved texture and moistness
  • 6 tablespoons (85g) unsalted butter, at room temperature, at least 65°F
  • 1/2 cup (113g) milk, at room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract, optional
  • 1 tablespoon (14g) lemon juice, optional for flavor

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease an 8" x 2" square pan or a 9" x 2" round pan. To assure crumble-free removal of the cake from the round pan, line the pan with parchment.

Stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and Cake Enhancer in a medium-sized mixing bowl.

Cut the butter into pats, and add it to the bowl. Mix at low speed until the mixture is evenly crumbly.

In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together the milk, eggs, vanilla, and almond.

Perfect your technique

Plain & Simple Golden Cake

Add half the milk/egg mixture to the flour in the bowl. Beat just to combine, then add the remaining milk/egg mixture, beating just to combine.

Beat the batter at high speed for 15 seconds, to make sure everything is totally combined.

Scoop the batter into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with a spatula.

Bake the cake on your oven's middle rack for 35 to 38 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, and the center of the top springs back when pressed lightly with your finger.

Remove the cake from the oven, and place it on a rack. After 10 to 15 minutes, loosen its edges with a table knife or spatula and carefully turn it out onto a rack. Peel off the parchment, and turn it right side up. Let the cake cool completely before serving. Serve plain sprinkled with confectioners' sugar, or spread with your favorite icing.


Vanilla Bundt Cake

We tested this cake over and over again until it was absolutely perfect. Even the most amateur baker can nail it at home. Answers to all of your questions are below!

Do I need to use cake flour?

No! Our secret ingredient is cornstarch! Whisking it into all-purpose flour makes the crumb super light and tender.

Why so many eggs?

Eggs wear many hats. They're used in baking to bind, lift, and moisten cakes. Bundt cakes are big and hearty, so you need a good amount of them.

Can I substitute vanilla extract?

Absolutely. In fact, that would be the more traditional move. However, we think that almond extract adds a lovely flavor that everyone will notice and love&mdasheven if they can't identify what it is.

Why do I need to stir the wet and dry ingredients separately?

It prevents you from over=mixing! Whisking the dry ingredients separately also ensures that everything&mdashincluding the salt!&mdashis evenly dispersed before you mix into the batter.

Do I need to add the dry ingredients gradually?

Not really. But it's an additional precaution to make sure that you don't over-mix. Over-mixing leads to tough, dense cakes!

Can I make this ahead of time?

Yep. Covered with plastic wrap, it keeps well at room temperature for up to 2 days.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for pan
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for pan
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 6-cup (8 1/2-by-4 1/2-inch) loaf pan set aside.

Using an electric mixer on high speed, beat butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition add vanilla and salt. With mixer on low, gradually add flour, beating just until combined (do not overmix).

Bake until a toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean, about 1 hour (tent with aluminum foil if browning too quickly). Let cool in pan 15 minutes. Invert onto a wire rack, and turn upright to cool completely.


Ingredients you will need:

Egg whites Milk Salt Butter/Shortening Flour Baking Powder Sugar Vanilla Extract

Plain Vanilla Cake Para 8 raciones de Plain Vanilla Cake

1 Taza de mantequilla
3 Huevos
3 Yemas
2 Cdtas de vainilla
1 1/4 Taza de azúcar
1 3/4 Taza de harina

Precalienta el horno a 325 grados Farenheit. Engrasa y enharina un molde de tortas rectangular
En un bowl coloca los huevos, las yemas y la vainilla y con la ayuda de un tenedor bate suavemente hasta que todo este incorporado.
En otro bowl coloca la mantequilla y bátela hasta que este suave por unos 3 minutos. Agrega el azúcar y bate por 3 minutos mas o hasta que este suave y esponjosa. Lentamente añade la mezcla de huevo y continua mezclando por 3 minutos más.
Agrega la harina en dos adiciones, incorporándola suavemente con la ayuda de una espátula
Vierte la mezcla en el molde de tortas y lleva al horno por 1 hora 20 minutos o hasta que este lista.
Retira del horno, deja enfriar y sirve


Classic Vanilla Bundt Cake

Fine-grained, high-rising, and tender, this golden cake is simplicity at its best. Baked in a Bundt pan for a touch of elegance, it's equally good served with fresh berries, ice cream, or all on its own.

Ingredients

  • 24 tablespoons (340g) unsalted butter, at room temperature, at least 65°F
  • 1 1/2 cups (298g) granulated sugar
  • 6 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 3 cups (361g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 tablespoon (14g) vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract, optional
  • 3/4 cup (170g) milk, at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup (67g) granulated sugar
  • 5 teaspoons water
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

Place the butter and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Beat together at medium speed until the mixture lightens in color and looks fluffy. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl.

Add the baking powder and salt, mixing just to combine.

Weigh out the flour, or measure it by gently spooning it into a measuring cup, sweeping off any excess with a straight edge. Set it aside.

Perfect your technique

Classic Vanilla Bundt Cake

With the mixer running at medium speed, add the first three eggs to the butter/sugar mixture one at a time. Wait until each egg is absorbed into the mixture before adding the next.

Add 2 tablespoons of the measured flour to the bowl after the third egg, and mix until combined. Add the fourth egg, mix until absorbed, then mix in another 2 tablespoons of flour. Continue in this fashion with the fifth and sixth eggs, alternating the addition of the egg with 2 tablespoons of the flour from the recipe.

Add the vanilla (or vanilla bean paste) and almond extract to the milk.

Add one-third of the remaining flour to the batter, beating gently to combine. Gently beat in half the milk. Mix in another third of the flour, then the remaining milk. Stir in the remaining flour. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl, then beat until the batter is smooth and fluffy, about 20 to 30 seconds at medium-high speed.

Thoroughly grease a 10- to 12-cup Bundt pan, using non-stick vegetable oil spray or shortening (not butter butter tends to increase sticking). Scoop the batter into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with a spatula.

Bake the cake for 50 to 60 minutes, until it's starting to brown, appears set on top, and a toothpick or long skewer inserted into the center comes out clean. (If you're baking in a dark-interior pan, start checking at 45 minutes.) If the cake appears to be browning too quickly, tent it with foil for the final 15 minutes of baking.

Remove the cake from the oven, and gently loosen its edges using a heatproof spatula. Turn the pan over onto a cooling rack. After 10 minutes, lift the pan off the cake, and allow it to cool completely.

While the cake is cooling in the pan, make the glaze. Combine the sugar, water, and salt. Heat briefly, just to dissolve the sugar a microwave works fine. Stir in the vanilla. Once you've turned the cake out of the pan onto a rack to cool, gently brush it all over with the glaze.

Just before serving, sift a shower of confectioners' sugar over the top, if desired. A garnish of fresh berries is lovely and tasty.

Store leftover cake, well wrapped, at room temperature for several days. Freeze for longer storage.

Tips from our Bakers

Looking for a gluten-free version of this recipe? Find it here: Gluten-Free Vanilla Bundt Cake.

If you sometimes have trouble with your Bundt cake getting stuck in the pan, check out the helpful tips in this blog post: How to prevent Bundt cakes from sticking. If your cake ends up sticking anyway, see Stuck Bundt for help.

Want to bake different size Bundt cakes? Bake this recipe in a Bundt quartet pan for 30 to 35 minutes in a Bundtlette pan for 20 to 25 minutes or in a half-size Bundt pan for 35 to 45 minutes, tenting with foil for the last 10 minutes or so, to prevent over-browning.


Watch the video: Αφράτο Κλασικό Κέικ Βανίλιας Η συνταγή που θα σας τη ζητάνε ΟΛΟΙ - Vanilla Cake Recipe (December 2021).