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Foods You'll Be Surprised You Have to Ditch When You Take Sugar Out of Your Diet

Foods You'll Be Surprised You Have to Ditch When You Take Sugar Out of Your Diet

Don’t just toss the candy and the cookies, there are common foods you may be forgetting

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Sugar is not always in plain sight.

When you think of sugar, you probably think of candy, table sugar, donuts, pastries, soda, and ice cream. You wouldn’t associate carbohydrates, such as white bread and potatoes as sugar because they are not sweet.

Click here for These Everyday Foods Contain Way More Sugar Than You Thought slideshow.

This is absolutely not to say you should give up all carbohydrates when you remove sugar from your diet, because carbohydrates are the main source of fuel for the body. Not to mention, vegetables, fruits, and whole grains are all nutrient-dense carbohydrates you need to stay healthy.

With that said, if you are trying a sugar-free diet, you may want to consider eliminating the sugars and carbohydrates that are not helpful to your body. When it comes to eliminating foods, try to avoid the color white: white bread, white rice, white pasta, white crackers, and white potatoes. Artificial sweeteners found in a lot of processed foods such as cookies, chips, and other snack foods can be eliminated completely. In terms of bread and pasta, skip out on the white kind and go all-in for whole-grain and whole-wheat. Instead of white potatoes, try making sweet potatoes.

These changes can be made even if you are not giving up sugar completely. Making small changes to your diet such as swapping white rice for brown rice, sugared cereal for plain, whole-grain cereal, and swapping your milk chocolate bar with unsweetened dark chocolate.

The accompanying slideshow is provided by fellow Daily Meal editorial staff member Dan Myers.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

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3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

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Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

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  • This DIY Natural Nail Strengthener Requires Only 1 Household Ingredient posted on February 22, 2017

Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

  • 10 of the Best Water Apps to Use for Free posted on June 21, 2016
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  • This YouTuber Followed 9 Simple Food Rules to Transform Her Body posted on May 11, 2018
  • This DIY Natural Nail Strengthener Requires Only 1 Household Ingredient posted on February 22, 2017

Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

  • 10 of the Best Water Apps to Use for Free posted on June 21, 2016
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Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

  • 10 of the Best Water Apps to Use for Free posted on June 21, 2016
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  • This DIY Natural Nail Strengthener Requires Only 1 Household Ingredient posted on February 22, 2017

Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

  • 10 of the Best Water Apps to Use for Free posted on June 21, 2016
  • 7 Ways to Reduce Afternoon Stomach Bloating posted on July 27, 2017
  • This YouTuber Followed 9 Simple Food Rules to Transform Her Body posted on May 11, 2018
  • This DIY Natural Nail Strengthener Requires Only 1 Household Ingredient posted on February 22, 2017

Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

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[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

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3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

  • 10 of the Best Water Apps to Use for Free posted on June 21, 2016
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  • This DIY Natural Nail Strengthener Requires Only 1 Household Ingredient posted on February 22, 2017

Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


3 Tips for Eating Gluten-Free, Whether You’re a Celiac or Not

Whether you’re a bona fide celiac or just sensitive to gluten, if eating gluten-free (GF) alleviates your symptoms, do it! The key in GF eating lies in expectations, communication, and preparation. Here are a few tips on executing a GF diet, whether it’s for life or just a test run.

Expect

GF is inherently inconvenient (unless you live in Southeast Asia and eat rice and vegetables seasoned with non-wheat soy sauce everyday). You must accept that it won’t be easy. And then you’ll be flabbergasted when you realize how easy it really is.

By setting expectations low, you will be amazed and joyous when a restaurant has a GF menu or when a pizza place offers GF crust. Low expectations mean happiness.

Communicate

No one likes a needy, picky eater. Being GF makes you that, but if you value and execute communication with those you eat with, you’ll surprise your friends at how easy GF living can be.

Thus, be upfront about your restrictions and don’t set yourself up for failure. Suggest ethnic or fusion restaurants with groups, instead of Italian or American-style bar food that likely won’t have GF options.

If your friends are okay with an Asian restaurant that offers rice bowls and then you get there and realize all of the sauces are thickened with wheat, don’t make a scene. Deal with plain veggies and rice and communicate to your friends that you didn’t expect this to happen so they don’t pity you during the meal.

Friends will appreciate you being open about your diet if you are flexible and forthright about what you expected and why it’s oaky when those expectations fall short. It’s life.

Prepare

Being GF means you need to be on top of your dietary game on trips, camping excursions, holiday parties, and BBQs.

People will forget that you cannot drink beer. Your best friends will forget that you cannot drink beer. You will forget that you cannot drink beer.

Always have cider or wine handy, or if cocktails are your thing, have hard alcohol, and mixers stocked. This way, when you’re heading out the door for a party, you can bring your own beverage. As mentioned before about expectations, in the chance someone gets you GF bevies, you’ll be elated and oh so grateful.

For camping and road trips, bring ample amounts of food. If a group meal list is happening, communicate your GF needs, but state you’re happy to bring backup tortillas, bread, or any substitute if a meal is easier being non-GF.

Bring GF oatmeal packets and traditional, naturally GF snacks like apples and peanut butter. You can never have enough backup options in the chance that a group meal accidentally turns out to be non GF.

Ideas for easy, on-the-go GF meals: RICE, RICE and more RICE. Add veggies, meat, sprinkles, you name it. Having a rice base solves all GF problems and no non-GF person will wonder where’s the pasta. Everyone loves rice.

Do you suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease? Share any tips you have below!

About the Author

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face and travels extensively for races and philanthropic work. She studied coral ecology at Princeton University where she also ran cross country and track. Clare has taught English in Thailand where she started a non-profit environmental stewardship program, she has scribed in emergency rooms across Denver, and she writes regularly for various running blogs.

You might also like

A Fad-Free Guide to Weight Loss

10 Ways to Help Combat Emotional Eating

3 Simple Steps to Kick Sugar to the Curb

15 Tips to Quit Sugar

4 Reasons to Ditch Diet Sweeteners

9 Surprising Facts You Need to Know, If You’re Trying to Detox from Sugar

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

[…] when GF diets and foods weren’t nearly as common as they are today, and fortunately, I’ve honed key practices on how to eat GF. Lowering expectations, and executing communication and preparation are the keys to success! […]

Comments are closed.

Trending

  • 10 of the Best Water Apps to Use for Free posted on June 21, 2016
  • 7 Ways to Reduce Afternoon Stomach Bloating posted on July 27, 2017
  • This YouTuber Followed 9 Simple Food Rules to Transform Her Body posted on May 11, 2018
  • This DIY Natural Nail Strengthener Requires Only 1 Household Ingredient posted on February 22, 2017

Stay fresh & in the loop with a healthy dose of weekly updates with out best stories.


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