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Savoury marrow bake recipe

Savoury marrow bake recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes

This is like a savoury tray bake, with marrow, herbs and Parmesan cheese. Serve as a side dish, snack or main.


County Clare, Ireland

302 people made this

IngredientsServes: 16

  • 100g plain flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon caster sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 50g freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
  • 1/2 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
  • 4 eggs
  • 125ml olive or vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 450g grated marrow, squeezed dry

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:35min ›Ready in:50min

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 C / Gas 4.
  2. In a bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, Parmesan cheese, parsley, oregano and basil. Beat together the eggs, oil and onion; fold into dry ingredients just until combined. Fold in marrow.
  3. Turn into a greased 20x30cm baking dish. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown and set. Cut into squares.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(29)

Reviews in English (29)

quick and easy to make and really tasty. I made it with cheddar cheese rather than parmesan, and it was great. Will make again.-04 Sep 2010

Just made this with a marrow we were given and will definately make again!I used cheddar, but a stronger cheese would have been better, and I used wheat free flour as Im gluten intolerant!Next time Im going to try using butternut squash,or even sweet potato and will maybe add some chili flakes!-03 Nov 2012

I really enjoyed this recipe. It wasn't one of the families favourites but I loved the simplicity and the fact that its another way of using the many courgettes out of the garden!! Will make again.-04 Sep 2009


5 delicious ways to cook marrow

Marrows: so misunderstood. Easy to grow, they often get a bad rap for being watery and flavourless, when in fact they are so much more than that.

Stuffing them with meat or spiced fillings is the traditional way to cook a marrow, but in fact they're also popular in curries and soups, and a marrow is a great vegetable to place under a Sunday roast chicken or beef joint to soak up all the juices. Inspired? Read on for some delicious recipes .


Harvest Festival - English Baked Stuffed Autumn Marrow/Zucchini

Harvest Home! A heart warming and traditional English recipe, which is a wonderful way to deal with those large marrows (zucchini) from the autumn garden! The marrow is stuffed with a savoury beef and onion mixture and is then baked in foil. This is an old family recipe, which always pleases and is regularly requested when these giant marrows are in season – it is hearty and full of flavour and is wonderful when served with a hot tomato sauce, steamed fresh seasonal vegetables and piles of fluffy mashed potatoes. The preparation is a little time-consuming, but the stuffed marrow is then baked slowly in the oven, leaving you free to follow other pursuits. I have posted a full set of step-by-step photos with this recipe, it shows how easy it is to prepare and cook, as well as showing how delicious it looks when served piping hot at your dinner table! The title of this recipe was taken from memories of all the Harvest Festivals we had every year, that were held at school or the local parish church - marrows (LARGE zucchini) were always a BIG feature of the harvest display!


Savoury Dishes

Probably the majority of men, when asked their favourite dish would reply “Steak and Kidney Pudding” – and certainly nothing could be more delicious, appetising and nutritious – particularly in cold weather.

We have therefore given our recommendations for the perfect Steak and Kidney Pudding – followed by suggestions for alternative fillings, which should prove almost as popular. In addition, you will find in this chapter recipes for a number of savoury dishes – all of which help to give variety to your meals and ensure economical catering.

Steak and Kidney Pudding

For the Pudding: 8 ozs flour (with plain flour use 1 teaspoon baking powder). 4 ozs “ATORA”. Good pinch salt,. Water to mix.

For the Filling: ¾-1lb stewing steak. 2-3 lambs’ kidneys or 4ozs ox kidney. Seasoning. Water or stock.

Seal the edges of the pastry well together. Cover with greased paper and cloth or just a cloth, dipped in boiling water and floured. Steam for 4 hours, and serve with a thickened gravy.

Variations on Steak and Kidney Pudding

  • For a richer Pudding. You can include about 8 bearded sauce oysters, and 2 ozs chopped mushrooms.
  • Onion and Steak. If desired a small quantity of chopped onion can be included in Steak and Kidney Pudding, otherwise use about 3 sliced onions and stewing steak, without kidney.
  • Minced Steak Pudding. Cooking time can be saved by half if you put the steak kidney and onion or other ingredients through a mincer. Fill the pudding as usual and cook for 2 hours.
  • Cup Steak Puddings. To save a little cooking time, the pudding can be made into four individual puddings in odd cups or small basins. Allow 3 hours steaming.
  • Rabbit or Hare Pudding. Use the meat from one small or half a large rabbit, add ½ teaspoon sage, 2 sliced onions, 2 sliced tomatoes and a few chopped mushrooms. If you prefer to use meat from parts of a hare, add sliced onions, one sliced apple, a tablespoon red wine to the water or stock and plenty of seasoning.
  • Mushroom Pudding. Make a pudding filled with mushrooms only to serve as a separate dish or with grilled bacon or ham.

Steak and Kidney Pie

1lb stewing steak. 3 sheep’s kidneys or approximately 6 ozs ox kidney. 4-6 ozs mushrooms. Salt and pepper. About 1½ gills water or stock. Level tablespoon flour.

For the Pastry. 6ozs flour (with plain flour use ¾ teaspoon baking powder). 3 ozs “ATORA”. Good pinch salt. Water to mix.

Brush with a little milk or beaten egg to give a good shine, and bake in the centre of a hot oven for 20 minutes – Mark 7 or 450°F, then lower the heat to moderate, Mark 4 or 400°F for a further 20-25 minutes.

Baked Savoury Roll

Throughout this book you will find recipes for Sweet Roly Poly and savoury rolls – see Traditional recipes and Christmas Section. All these fillings can be put into the suet crust and baked – in addition here are further ideas for you to try.

  • Beef Steak and Kidney Roll. ½lb minced been steak, 1 or 2 minced kidneys and a finely chopped onion. Season well. Roll tightly. Bake for an hour 400°F.
  • Sausage and Apple Roll. Cover the pastry with about ¾lb sausage meat, 2 chopped apples and 2 chopped onions. Season well. Bake as before.

Other recipes in this section for Savoury Puddings, which I’ve not typed out yet include:


Savoury Marrow Pancake

Do you guys remember ? A HUGE marrow was given by my neighbour ?, I did mention in my Oatilicious Marrow Paniyaram post. No ? it's just a click away that recipe, please do check it out. It took me more than week to finish that Huge thing :) Glad, I finished it, didn't want to throw so I asked my FB friends where else can I use this marrow and quite a few friends gave me lots of suggestions.

  • 1 cup besan ( chick pea flour )
  • 3/4 cup Rice flour
  • 2 cup grated marrow or bottle gourd ( dudhi )
  • 1 medium onion finely chopped
  • 3-4 tbsp green chillies, ginger and garlic paste
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp crushed whole cumin and dried whole coriander
  • Salt to taste
  • 2-3 tbsp fresh chopped coriander
  • Oil for shallow frying
  • 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda

Method:-
Place all the ingredients in a big bowl except oil and combine everything . Do not add water, water from marrow will loose it's own water.
Leave it aside for 10-12 minutes and mix well. Check the seasoning.
Smear a large, wide, non-stick frying-pan with 1 tsp of the oil and set over a lowish heat. When very hot, stir the batter and pour about one small ladalful on to the centre of the pan.
Quickly tilt the pan in all directions as you would for a crêpe, spreading the batter to make an round small pancake.
Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the pancake is reddish-brown at the bottom.
Dribble another tsp of oil around the edges of the pancake. Turn the pancake over and cook, uncovered, for a further minute or until golden.
Remove from the heat and they are ready to eat. Repeat with the remaining batter. Always remember to stir the batter before you use it. (leftover batter may be covered, refrigerated and re-used).


Savoury Marrow

250g Extra Lean mince beef (ff)
1Kg Marrow (s)(sff)
1 Onion, finely chopped (s)(sff)
1 Carrot, finely chopped (s)(sff)
1 Celery, finely chopped (s)(sff)
1Tbsp “very lazy” garlic
1Tbsp Basil
1Tbsp Tomato Puree (s)(sff)
1 Tbsp. Sweetener
1 Red Pepper, sliced & de-seeded (s)(sff)
350mL Passata (s)(sff)
Shake of Worcester sauce
45g Low Fat Cheddar cheese, grated (1Hea)
45g Mozzarella cheese, cut into small pieces (1Hea)

Cook the mince in a dry frying pan until the meat is browned, remove from the pan and set aside.

In a food chopper, chop the onion, carrot, celery & basil.
Spray the pan with Fry Light and cook the onion, carrot, red pepper, celery & garlic for 5 mins to soften, return the beef to the pan, mix together and cook for a few mins then add the passata, sweetener & tomato puree, sprinkle with Worcester sauce mix and simmer for 20 mins.

Prepare the marrow by cutting lengthways and remove the seeds, cut a thin layer from the bottom side of the marrow so that it sits firmly when you put it in an oven-proof dish.

Pre-heat the oven to 160c and line the oven-proof dish with tinfoil to create a “pocket” spray with Fry Light, lay the marrow in it, spoon the mince mixture into the two scooped out halves, Loosely fold the tinfoil to seal it but allow space for the steam to escape, cook for 30 -45mins , then open the tinfoil & check if the flesh is soft, if it is, then add the cheese, return uncovered for a further 20 mins to melt the cheese and brown the top. Served with salad.


Nigel Slater's marrow recipes

S ome of you have a soft spot for the marrow, to judge from the wheelbarrow full of letters I once received after daring to malign the wretched thing. I have always had my doubts about any vegetable heavy enough to be used as a murder weapon. All ideas were welcome, especially those that avoided minced-beef stuffing. Sorry, mince and marrow just does not ring my bell. Prefix it with the word 'steamed' and we are talking purgatory.

But I agree with those who sent recipes for their versions of marrow in white sauce I, too, rather like the hot, wet blandness of this culinary institution. It is soothing in its delicacy. Sometimes you want something that tastes of absolutely nothing and slithers down without effort.

The marrows I bought this week were a fantastic bargain. They cost 60p a piece and were big enough to feed four with a bit of stuffing. In a harvest mood, I bought dahlias with the change, just to annoy the taste police. I took an alternative route from stuffing and let them bubble slowly with olive oil as green as Chartreuse and a couple of handfuls of basil. At the end of cooking I added black pepper and lemon juice. The pale green of the squash shone bright, the marrow softened and took up some of the oil's grassy flavour.

Taking the idea on slightly, I dropped some peas into the oil, and a similar amount of water, therefore turning a side dish into a light supper. Those ready-shelled peas from Marks & Spencer or even a bag of the frozen variety would be just the ticket. A few bits of bacon and some chopped salad onions fried till fragrant before you add the chunks of marrow are another possibility - though I have yet to try that one.

I have warmed both to the marrow and the swede, of late. Even more so now I have found how good fried marrow is. It's as light as a feather and juicy within if you do it right. Try it this way. Rid the vegetable of its peel - so thick, so inedible - and cut the pale flesh into rough chunks, scooping out the cotton-wool core as you go. Put the pieces into a colander in the sink, sprinkle liberally with sea salt and leave for half an hour or so, till much of the water has dripped away. Rinse briefly, dry and fry.

The crispest of these was when I dusted the marrow in flour first, fried it in deep peanut oil then drained it on kitchen paper and seasoned the result with salt, chopped mint leaves and a big squeeze of lemon.

Those intent on stuffing their marrow may care to try something different from the usual ground meat. Lentils are good here, partly because of the little bit of crunch they retain if not overcooked. You will need more than just pulses to make a filling worth eating, so try adding them to a base of softened onions, tomato and greens, such as shredded spinach. Herbs are a must. Try mint, coriander or thyme, all of which work well with brown or green lentils. A firm lentil that keeps its shape and texture is the slightly smoky Castellucio variety or the dusky, greeny blue Le Puy. But we must use what we have. Avoid split lentils - they fall to a slush during cooking.

A friend told me of another trick. Chop the peeled marrow into thick cubes, lay them in foil with a little butter and some kernels of sweetcorn, then add a decent knob of butter and wrap them loosely, baking till the marrow is soft and juicy. A sweet, buttery smell billows up as you tear open the bag.

Marrow reaches its most interesting when it is baked round the Sunday roast. Yes, it collapses a bit, but I am not worried about that. The idea is to let it soften and take up some of the meat juices. Baste it now and again. It is most successful added about half an hour before the meat is due out. When I say meat, I for once mean beef. Like roast parsnips, baked marrow just feels right with beef and particularly with the pan drippings which, if you are lucky, add a delectable savoury sheen.

You would think that dried, baked, roast and stuffed were methods enough, but I had a last-minute surprise when I decided to stew some fat slices of marrow slowly in butter. I kept the heat low, pouring in a little peanut oil to stop the butter browning, then, just as the edges started to colour, I chucked in a handful of coriander leaves and put the lid on for a minute or two. It worked better than I would have imagined alongside a plate of grilled Cumberland sausages - even though it did feel like the first meal of winter.

Marrow with peas and basil

Serves 2-4 as an accompaniment

a small marrow
100ml olive oil
250g podded or frozen peas
a handful of basil leaves
50g butter
the juice of a lemon

Peel the skin from the marrow - a pleasing enough task with a vegetable peeler - then halve it, pull out the fluffy core and its seeds and cut the flesh into finger-thick slices.

Warm the olive oil in a casserole to which you have a lid, then add the peeled marrow. After 5 minutes of cooking over a moderate heat, pour in 100ml water, the peas and a little salt and cover with a lid. Let the vegetables bubble gently over a lowish heat till the peas are bright and softening and the marrow is well and truly tender.

Add the basil, the butter, some black pepper and a good squeeze of lemon juice.

Parchment-baked marrow and sweetcorn

As you tear open the paper, the smell of marrow, sweetcorn, butter and pepper wafts up appetisingly. It makes a cheap supper, though some people may prefer to use it as an accompaniment, in which case it would go very well with some baked ham. For each person, you will need:

350g marrow
a small cob of corn
40g butter

Peel the marrow and scrape out the seeds and core, then slice the flesh into thick slices, and then into chunks. You should get about 200g.

Lay the marrow on a square of kitchen foil or baking parchment. Pull back the leaves of the corn cob and remove the silky threads from the sharp end. Holding the corn at the fat end and with the pointed end to the paper or foil, cut downwards along the cob slicing off the kernels. Run the blade of the knife along the cob to extract any juice, then discard the remains.

Put the butter on top then grind over some salt and black pepper. Wrap the foil around the marrow and corn and seal loosely.

Bake at 200 C/gas mark 6 for 30 minutes, by which time the marrow will be soft enough to crush juicily with a fork. Better still, it will have soaked up much of the sweetness from the corn. A buttery, peppery recipe for the end of summer.

Marrow with lentils and spinach

For those determined to stuff their marrow - a spicy lentil filling. The most appropriate lentils are small brown or dark green ones. Serves 4

a medium-sized marrow
250g small brown or green lentils
2 large shallots
4 tbsp olive oil
6 medium-sized tomatoes or 20 cherry tomatoes
chilli sauce, such as harissa
2 handfuls of green leaves such as spinach or chard

Bring a pan of water to the boil in which to cook the lentils. Add them to the water and leave to simmer, rather vigorously, until they are soft.

Meanwhile, peel and slice the shallots and soften them in a saucepan with the olive oil. Chop the tomatoes, peeling them if they have tough skins (dunk the whole tomato into boiling water then peel off the skin after a few seconds) and add them to the pan. Let them cook a while, till they are soft and mushy, then stir in your chilli sauce. I use a couple of teaspoons of harissa here. The amount will depend on which chilli sauce you have around and how hot you like your lentils to be. Remember that the marrow will soften in the heat. Pour in just enough water (I used barely a tea-cup full) to make a slushy sauce, and add salt and black pepper.

Drain the cooked lentils, then stir them into the onion and chilli sauce. Tear the leaves of the spinach or chard up into small pieces and stir them in to the lentils. Bring to the boil, then cover and leave to simmer over a lower heat till the greens |are silky soft.

Cut the marrow in half lengthwise, but don't peel it - the rind will give it support. Scoop out the core and slide the two halves into a large pan of boiling, salted water. Leave until they are tender and translucent, then lift out with a draining spoon and lay them in a dish. You could, alternatively, steam it.

Spoon the lentil mixture into the hollows in the marrow, cover with foil or greaseproof paper, then bake for 20 minutes at 200 C/gas mark 6. This will enrich the marrow with the flavour of the sauce.


Savoury Dishes

Probably the majority of men, when asked their favourite dish would reply “Steak and Kidney Pudding” – and certainly nothing could be more delicious, appetising and nutritious – particularly in cold weather.

We have therefore given our recommendations for the perfect Steak and Kidney Pudding – followed by suggestions for alternative fillings, which should prove almost as popular. In addition, you will find in this chapter recipes for a number of savoury dishes – all of which help to give variety to your meals and ensure economical catering.

Steak and Kidney Pudding

For the Pudding: 8 ozs flour (with plain flour use 1 teaspoon baking powder). 4 ozs “ATORA”. Good pinch salt,. Water to mix.

For the Filling: ¾-1lb stewing steak. 2-3 lambs’ kidneys or 4ozs ox kidney. Seasoning. Water or stock.

Seal the edges of the pastry well together. Cover with greased paper and cloth or just a cloth, dipped in boiling water and floured. Steam for 4 hours, and serve with a thickened gravy.

Variations on Steak and Kidney Pudding

  • For a richer Pudding. You can include about 8 bearded sauce oysters, and 2 ozs chopped mushrooms.
  • Onion and Steak. If desired a small quantity of chopped onion can be included in Steak and Kidney Pudding, otherwise use about 3 sliced onions and stewing steak, without kidney.
  • Minced Steak Pudding. Cooking time can be saved by half if you put the steak kidney and onion or other ingredients through a mincer. Fill the pudding as usual and cook for 2 hours.
  • Cup Steak Puddings. To save a little cooking time, the pudding can be made into four individual puddings in odd cups or small basins. Allow 3 hours steaming.
  • Rabbit or Hare Pudding. Use the meat from one small or half a large rabbit, add ½ teaspoon sage, 2 sliced onions, 2 sliced tomatoes and a few chopped mushrooms. If you prefer to use meat from parts of a hare, add sliced onions, one sliced apple, a tablespoon red wine to the water or stock and plenty of seasoning.
  • Mushroom Pudding. Make a pudding filled with mushrooms only to serve as a separate dish or with grilled bacon or ham.

Steak and Kidney Pie

1lb stewing steak. 3 sheep’s kidneys or approximately 6 ozs ox kidney. 4-6 ozs mushrooms. Salt and pepper. About 1½ gills water or stock. Level tablespoon flour.

For the Pastry. 6ozs flour (with plain flour use ¾ teaspoon baking powder). 3 ozs “ATORA”. Good pinch salt. Water to mix.

Brush with a little milk or beaten egg to give a good shine, and bake in the centre of a hot oven for 20 minutes – Mark 7 or 450°F, then lower the heat to moderate, Mark 4 or 400°F for a further 20-25 minutes.

Baked Savoury Roll

Throughout this book you will find recipes for Sweet Roly Poly and savoury rolls – see Traditional recipes and Christmas Section. All these fillings can be put into the suet crust and baked – in addition here are further ideas for you to try.

  • Beef Steak and Kidney Roll. ½lb minced been steak, 1 or 2 minced kidneys and a finely chopped onion. Season well. Roll tightly. Bake for an hour 400°F.
  • Sausage and Apple Roll. Cover the pastry with about ¾lb sausage meat, 2 chopped apples and 2 chopped onions. Season well. Bake as before.

Other recipes in this section for Savoury Puddings, which I’ve not typed out yet include:


Savoury Marrow

Serves 4
Ingredients
250g Extra Lean mince beef (ff)
1Kg Marrow (s)(sff)
1 Onion, finely chopped (s)(sff)
1 Carrot, finely chopped (s)(sff)
1 Celery, finely chopped (s)(sff)
1Tbsp “very lazy” garlic
1Tbsp Basil
1Tbsp Tomato Puree (s)(sff)
1 Tbsp. Sweetener
1 Red Pepper, sliced & de-seeded (s)(sff)
350mL Passata (s)(sff)
Shake of Worcester sauce
45g Low Fat Cheddar cheese, grated (1Hea)
45g Mozzarella cheese, cut into small pieces (1Hea)

Cook the mince in a dry frying pan until the meat is browned, remove from the pan and set aside.

In a food chopper, chop the onion, carrot, celery & basil.
Spray the pan with Fry Light and cook the onion, carrot, red pepper, celery & garlic for 5 mins to soften, return the beef to the pan, mix together and cook for a few mins then add the passata, sweetener & tomato puree, sprinkle with Worcester sauce mix and simmer for 20 mins.

Prepare the marrow by cutting lengthways and remove the seeds, cut a thin layer from the bottom side of the marrow so that it sits firmly when you put it in an oven-proof dish.

Pre-heat the oven to 160c and line the oven-proof dish with tinfoil to create a “pocket” spray with Fry Light, lay the marrow in it, spoon the mince mixture into the two scooped out halves, Loosely fold the tinfoil to seal it but allow space for the steam to escape, cook for 30 -45mins , then open the tinfoil & check if the flesh is soft, if it is, then add the cheese, return uncovered for a further 20 mins to melt the cheese and brown the top. Served with salad.


Veggie bake with bacon crumb

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Peel and slice the butternut and sweet potatoes into 1⁄2 cm-thick pieces. Arrange snugly in an ovenproof dish, pour over the sour cream, season to taste and sprinkle over garlic and a few sprigs fresh thyme. Bake for 25 minutes.

At the same time, grill the streaky bacon until crispy. Finely chop the bacon, mix with Woolworths crispy onion sprinkle and breadcrumbs, then sprinkle over the vegetables and bake for a further 10–15 minutes until golden and tender.

Cook's note: Serve with chicken schnitzel and asparagus tips glazed in melted butter with a squeeze of lemon juice. You can also swap the butternut and sweet potato for baby marrow and brinjal if you prefer.

Recipe by: Hannah Lewry View all recipes

Woolworths TASTE’s Food Editor is passionate about conjuring up fresh ideas for fast and easy dishes that taste as great as they look. Turn to her expertise for everything from time-saving mid-week food to lazy weekend meals. You’ll have a lot of fun in the kitchen while you’re about it.