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Butter Lettuce with Goat Cheese Green Goddess Dressing

Butter Lettuce with Goat Cheese Green Goddess Dressing

Ingredients

  • 1 5-ounce package soft fresh goat cheese
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
  • 8 large heads of butter lettuce, quartered lengthwise (leaving some core attached)

Recipe Preparation

  • Using rubber spatula, mix goat cheese and sour cream in medium bowl. Puree buttermilk, avocados, tarragon, parsley, and chives in blender until smooth. Gradually whisk buttermilk mixture into goat cheese mixture until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Dressing can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Divide lettuce among plates. Drizzle with dressing.

Recipe by Bruce Aidells, Nancy OakesReviews Section

27 with cheese green goddess dressing Recipes

Goat Cheese Green Goddess Dressing

Goat Cheese Green Goddess Dressing

Butter Lettuce with Goat Cheese Green Goddess Dressing

Butter Lettuce with Goat Cheese Green Goddess Dressing

Green Goddess Dressing. Low Calorie/Low Fat

Green Goddess Dressing. Low Calorie/Low Fat

Arancini With Green Goddess Dressing

Arancini With Green Goddess Dressing

Tender Zucchini Fritters with Green Goddess Dressing

Tender Zucchini Fritters with Green Goddess Dressing

Tender Zucchini Fritters With Green Goddess Dressing

Tender Zucchini Fritters With Green Goddess Dressing

Green Goddess Salad Dressing (low fat, low sodium)

Green Goddess Salad Dressing (low fat, low sodium)

Homemade Boursin Cheese

Homemade Boursin Cheese

Roasted Butternut Squash Salad and Kale Summer Rolls with Feta Cheese and Avocado Green Goddess Dressing

Roasted Butternut Squash Salad and Kale Summer Rolls with Feta Cheese and Avocado Green Goddess Dressing

Everybody's Turkey Pita

Lettuce 2.0: In and out of the salad bowl

CLEVELAND, Ohio - The first tender green salad from your very own lettuce patch is the well-deserved reward of hope, hard work, faith, diligence, and more often than not, the fatalism and rigor of Mr. McGregor.

Remember that ornery Scots farmer who was always at odds about the fate of his garden’s produce with that scamp, Peter Rabbit? Well, sharing is caring, and hopefully you’ve worked it out with your own lagomorphs to equitably divide the bounty.

So now the issue is how many salads, as good as they are, can you possibly eat? In the interest of expanding your green horizons, explore the recipes below. They showcase familiar, and perhaps some new-to-you varieties available from local farmers’ markets in a myriad of flavors and colors from Rothko-esque maroon and deepest green to Monet-like pink and celadon.

Yes, there are some salads, too intriguing to be left out, but there’s also some lettuce-based apps, a wrap, and even a soup that should hold your interest until the last leafy plant has bolted. Then you and your bunnies can together turn to the next tempting harvest in the garden.

Green Goddess Cobb salad

A cornucopia of good things from the garden and beyond, this composed salad takes a little extra work, but the result is a one-dish meal that dazzles in presentation and taste, with a creamy tarragon-rich dressing that would elevate any salad from the mundane to the divine.

4 Little Gem, red Bibb, or other small lettuces, leaves separated

1-2 Belgian endives, thinly sliced

1 cup sugar-snap peas, sliced in half

1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved or quartered, depending on size

1 rotisserie chicken, skin removed, meat torn into bite-size pieces

1 avocado, thinly sliced (reserve ¼ for dressing below)

1 ounce pancetta, prosciutto or Serrano ham

Green goddess dressing (see below)

• Heat a small dry skillet and cook pancetta 4-5 minutes, turning once, until meat is brown and crisp.

• Drain on paper towel, set aside.

• Arrange lettuce on platter. Drizzle with half the dressing and season with salt and freshly ground pepper.

• Arrange onion, snap peas, chicken, tomatoes and remaining avocado as desired on lettuce.

• Top with remaining dressing, then crumbled pancetta. Serve with panache.

Adapted from Bon Appetit

Green Goddess dressing

¼ cup fresh tarragon leaves, with tender stems (packed) OR 1 tbsp. dried tarragon

• Puree scallions, herbs, ¼ avocado, oil, vinegar and yogurt in a blender or food processor until smooth.

• Thin dressing with a little more vinegar (up to 1 teaspoon) or water to a cream-like consistency.

• Add salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

Heidi and Susan and Sasha’s salad 2.0

Forget almost everything you know about traditional salads. This “bottoms-up” approach may become your new normal. Refined through three generations of inspired cooks, the technique teases every bit of flavor from your other ingredients first, then adds the lettuce, preserving all the delicate texture and crispness of the fragile leaves until the very last moment. There are no quantities here combine ingredients to your liking, tasting as you go. Add just about anything you would put in a traditional salad. This universal recipe will embrace it.

• In the bottom of a large serving bowl, combine finely chopped garlic with “an aggressive amount” of kosher salt.

• Add tomatoes and/or cucumber and let sit at least 5 minutes to release juices and marinate.

• Add fresh corn kernels, sweet peppers, pickled onions, etc. and a protein (diced cooked chicken, poached shrimp, chickpeas, etc.) if you like.

• Wash and thoroughly dry lettuce. Try a mix of more delicate varieties, butter lettuce or red leaf, with more assertive radicchio or elegant treviso. Wrap and refrigerate to keep fresh if not using right away. Tear into 2-inch pieces, layer over other ingredients and drizzle with good olive oil, adding 1 tbsp. at a time to taste. Now would be a good time to add crumbled feta or chevre, if desired.

• Toss to combine ingredients, being careful not to bruise the lettuce. Taste again, and finally add an acid, a little at a time (consider a wine vinegar/lemon juice combination - just enough to add freshness and piquancy).

• Toss gently once more and serve to acclaim.

Courtesy of Sasha Callahan.

Stuffed Endive with herbed goat-cheese appetizer

Crisp and pleasantly bitter, elegant ovals of Belgian endive are the perfect vessel for a herby goat-cheese filling. This quick and easy recipe gives you an irresistible opportunity to show off (almost) your entire repertoire of cosseted home-grown herbs.

3 ounces goat cheese, crumbled

1 ounce cream cheese (OR 1 tbsp. heavy cream)

1 lemon to make 2 tsp. fresh juice and 1 tsp. lemon zest

6 tablespoons mixed fresh herbs: Chives, parsley, tarragon, marjoram, oregano, thyme, rosemary, etc. (not cilantro)

• Separate endive into leaves.

• Combine remaining ingredients, add salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

• Spoon mixture equally into leaves, top with remaining herbs, serve with alacrity. Adapted from Southern Living

Lettuce wraps with spicy stir-fried pork

2 tbsp. vegetable oil, divided

3-4 tsp. hot chili paste (sambal oelek), depending on level of heat desired

2 tsp. finely grated lime zest

½ cup fresh lime juice (4-6 limes)

2 tbsp. fish sauce (nam pla OR nuoc nam)

1 tbsp. brown sugar (packed)

½ small red onion, finely chopped

1 cup fresh mint (coarsely chopped)

• Separate lettuce into leaves. Heat 1 tbsp. oil in large skillet over medium-high heat.

• Add garlic and 2 tsp. chili paste. Cook, stirring constantly, for about 1 minute.

• Add pork, breaking up with spoon.

• Heat 4-6 minutes, until pork is cooked through. Set aside to cool.

• Whisk lime juice, lime zest, fish sauce, brown sugar, remaining oil and remaining chili paste in small bowl. Reserve half for dipping sauce. Add other half to small saucepan with ½ teaspoon cornstarch and stir until cornstarch is dissolved and mixture is slightly thickened.

• Cool slightly and add pork mixture, mint leaves and chopped onion.

• Spoon mixture into lettuce leaves. Roll leaves around filling, dunk into chili sauce, eat with relish.

This recipe is perfectly delicious and legitimate in its own right, but it also admirably addresses a situation too often encountered in a bountiful lettuce season - the Wilt. We’re not talking about reversion to the primeval ooze, but lettuce that has only recently lost its dewy looks and crisp crunch. The pesto can be made with any lettuce except iceberg (because of its high water content). Try something assertive. Peppery arugula adds personality mixed in with sweeter red tip or even a handful of tender màche. Add herbs almost any will add a pleasant complexity. This recipe recommends basil, which will round out the flavors for those who seek the familiar pesto of yore.

4 cups lettuce leaves, torn into 2-inch pieces (large stems and ribs removed)


How to Prepare Beets for Salad

Learning how to roast beets is super simple, and once you’ve got it down, you’ll probably find yourself making them all the time. Not only are they delicious in this salad, their earthy sweetness, brilliant magenta color and lovely texture makes them a welcome addition to all kinds of things—salads of all kinds, toddler dinner plates, you can even try them sliced up on a sandwich. Here’s how to roast beets for salad:

  1. Wash your beets. Because they’re a root veggie, beets tend to be a little dirty. Give them a good wash, and maybe even a scrub.
  2. Trim the green tops off the beets. If you bought beets that have their whole tops, including the leafy greens, keep the greens! They’re extremely healthy and delicious sautéed with a little garlic—prep them just as you would spinach or collards.
  3. Wrap each individual beet in foil for roasting, and drizzle them with a little olive oil before sealing the foil packets.
  4. Roast! Roasting beets takes roughly an hour, depending on the size of the beets. Smaller ones might be ready after 40 minutes or so. You can check for doneness by sliding a knife into the beet. If it slides in easily, the beet is done.


Green Goddess Veggie Sandwich #vegan

This stunning rainbow sandwich is the thing that my lunch dreams are made of. Layers of destroyed carrots, radishes, rich lettuce, avocado, goat cheddar, treasure tomatoes, grows and meagerly cut cukes. All topped in a tasty green goddess dressing.

A simmered vegetable sandwich, included soft eggplant, jostled red peppers and lettuce does not a veggie lover sandwich make. I've nearly abandoned requesting a sandwich out, realizing that I'll likely be looked with just that decision. There is a simpler, better way! Toss every one of the veggies to finish everything, include a liberal smear of avocado and best with an energetic, herb imbued dressing. You'll never take a gander at a vegan sandwich a similar way again.

Green Goddess Veggie Sandwich! This sandwich is layered with flavor and pressed with vegetables! Natively constructed green-goddess dressing, tomatoes, grows, avocado, goat cheddar, radish, carrots. Veggie lover, effectively vegetarian or without gluten

The conceptualize for this sandwich thought left a larger than usual group of green goddess dressing that had been sitting in my cooler throughout the end of the week.

I got somewhat enthusiastic with the wealth of parsley that I had available, so I made pretty much every sauce you could consider: arugula, chimichurri and green goddess dressing. Life-stretching out contributions to my fragile clusters of herbs.

Green Goddess Veggie Sandwich! This sandwich is layered with flavor and stuffed with vegetables! Natively constructed green-goddess dressing, tomatoes, grows, avocado, goat cheddar, radish, carrots. Veggie lover, effectively vegetarian or without gluten.

Other than the dressing segment, it's practically senseless to compose a real formula for this awful kid. In the event that it's sitting in your crisper cabinet and can be tucked between two cuts of bread, it'll work.

New tomatoes and sprouts. I realize that sprouts can be somewhat elusive, (um, particularly with their propensity to harbor e.coli), yet they are justified, despite all the trouble in this sandwich. I adore, love, love sprouts and they are ideal for drenching up each drop of goddess dressing.

Green Goddess Veggie Sandwich! This sandwich is layered with flavor and stuffed with vegetables! Custom made green-goddess dressing, tomatoes, grows, avocado, goat cheddar, radish, carrots. Veggie lover, effectively vegetarian or sans gluten. | www.delishknowledge.com

Layer upon layer. You need this sandwich so enormous that you can't close it. That is the sweet spot. When the sandwich is filled, delicately push down with the goal that the layers merge together and the dressing can go through everything.


Green Goddess Dressing Ingredients

This salad dressing differs from most other green goddess dressings, but the flavor and texture remains so similar. Typically, you’ll find mayonnaise, lemon, and anchovies on the ingredients list. This recipe relies on Greek yogurt for tang and creaminess instead.

Greek Yogurt

High-quality whole-milk yogurt makes this dressing spectacular. I splurged on Straus Family Creamery and it’s just so good. I suspect regular plain yogurt would work well, too, though it will be more runny.

Fresh Herbs

Now we’re talking! This dressing calls for an overflowing cup of fresh, leafy herbs. Here are some notes on your options.

Tarragon: If you’re looking for classic green goddess flavor, be sure to use some tarragon. Its licorice-like flavor is strong, so limit the tarragon to about 2 tablespoons (or a small handful).

Chives or green onion: Chives are more classic, but green onion works almost nearly as well. To avoid overpowering your dressing with oniony flavor, limit these ingredients to about 1/4 cup.

Basil, parsley, cilantro, dill and/or mint: Use these to fill up the rest of your cup. Any one of these herbs (or any combination) will work beautifully. For dressing that would be suitable with Mexican meals, try using a lot of cilantro (and maybe add a fresh jalapeño—see recipe note). Dill lovers, try an all-dill dressing and drizzle it over potatoes.

Garlic

Just one small-to-medium clove—no more! In sauces and dressings, garlic often grows in intensity as it rests.

Salt and Pepper

Plenty of each—dressing should be bordering on salty when it’s your main seasoning for fresh produce. This dressing loves black pepper!


Little Gem Spring Salad with Toasted Seeds & Herbed Goat Cheese

When my brother was a kid, he convinced my aunt that he was allergic to "green stuff". aka salad. But he most definitely said "green stuff" which should have been a big red flag that he was full of crap. I'm not sure what's more unbelievable: the fact that my aunt bought his fib and let him get away without vegetables for the night, or that my brother later went on to become vegan for a several years.

The same 10-year old who would have sooner done all of the dishes for a month than take a bite of lettuce, would easily eat a whole bowl of this little gem spring salad nowadays.

It's been almost two years since I shared a salad on this blog. And it's not because I'm allergic to green stuff. To put that in perspective, I've shared 54 dessert recipes since I posted my last salad. This ratio would explain a few things. Namely, why all my pants seem to have shrunk and why my cat's suddenly taken a liking to kneading my belly at night.

Fortunately this isn't actually an accurate representation of my salad to sweet ratio - I promise. And this isn't like last week when I promised my dentist I floss regularly either - I really have been eating my greens!

My mom just passed down my late grandma's wedding salad bowl, so I'm finally getting around to sharing one of my so-called salads publicly. A bowl like this deserves a salad in its honor. The antique bowl came to me showing its age through a severely chipped finish that needed some TLC. Lucas sanded the surface just in time for me to pile in this spring salad the second he handed it to me. without washing the bowl. In my defense, he handed me a sexy smooth salad bowl that didn't appear to have sawdust on it, so we're probably not going to die.

We definitely still ate the salad. That's how awesome it is - you'll look past any trace of sawdust for another bite.

This green-on-green salad pulls herb-y inspiration from Alanna's Green Goddess Sandwiches (somebody get me a napkin to wipe up my drool). In true green goddess form, this salad version is heavy-handed on the greens, but with a lightened up herby vinaigrette that's only ever-so-slightly creamy.

Nine times out ten, we consume salad with chopsticks in our house (seriously, try it - it's so much easier that trying to stab soggy greens), but this sweet little gem lettuce has enough crispy oomph to be picked up with a fork. Radishes are tossed in for spice and texture, roasted nuts and seeds give a salty toasty crunch, tangled ribbons of silky shaved asparagus add a grassy note, and with pockets of creamy herbed goat cheese, this salad is my new favorite spring combo.

Thanks for reading Snixy Kitchen! To stay up on what’s coming out of my kitchen, follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Bloglovin’, or Pinterest, or subscribe via e-mail to get new recipes right to your inbox.


Lucy Waverman: These easy salads and desserts will liven up your summer

Salads may be a the star of the show, but don’t forget to pair your summer greens with an indulgent dessert on the side.

This article was published more than 6 months ago. Some information in it may no longer be current.

iStockPhoto / Getty Images

With summer in the air, salads are taking centre stage on our plates. And if we are eating salads, why not indulge in a few sweets or an outstanding appetizer? All these recipes are easy to make, fresh tasting and full of seasonal ingredients.

Today, many greens are grown that were not previously available. Some are wild plants that have a renewed life or have been tamed. Arugula and mache are good examples. Others, such as mizuna and tatsoi, have an Asian background. Combining multiple types of lettuce with other ingredients make summer salads more interesting and fun.

Jump to a recipe:

The following is a compendium of the more unusual summer greens.

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  • Arugula With oak-leaf shaped leaves, the lettuce provides a peppery, nutty taste in salad. It is excellent served with a main course as well as mixed with other greens. Goat cheese is often partnered with arugula. It is also known as rocket or rucola.
  • Belgian endive Elongated and elegant, Belgian endive is grown underground to keep its white appearance. Its slight bitterness is a good counterpoint to assertive ingredients. It also cooks well, especially braised in little stock with butter and sugar.
  • Bibb lettuce Small, mild, and sweet with loose leaves, this lettuce has a bit more texture than Boston lettuce. These soft leaf lettuces are known as butterheads because of their melt-in-the-mouth texture. They are best in salads dressed with light vinaigrettes.
  • Escarole Escarole is pale green and slightly bitter. It is part of the chicory family. Mix it with frisée and other chicories and incorporate with assertive ingredients such as blue cheese, nuts and bacon. It is also good stir-fried.
  • Frisée Finely curled, frizzy-leafed frisée ranges in colour from yellow white in the centre to darker green. Buy younger, smaller frisée and use as part of a salad mix or in an assertive salad with ingredients like chicken livers or poached eggs.
  • Lollo Rosso Mild and sweet, this lettuce is tightly ruffled with a red tip on the leaves. Use as part of a mixed salad. It is part of the leaf lettuce family.
  • Mâche Mâche, also known as lamb’s quarters, corn salad or field salad, grows in delicate clumps, and has spoon-shaped leaves. Remove the little roots before serving. It has a distinctive nutty, buttery flavour, and is good by itself or combined with other mild lettuce.
  • Mizuna This delicate Asian green with jagged green leaves and a white stalk appears more and more in the markets. Use as part of a salad mix or to garnish Asian dishes.
  • Oak leaf Part of the loose-leaf lettuce group, it has deeply indented, tender leaves that look like oak leaves. The stems are crunchy. It comes in red and green varieties, is perfect in a mixed salad, and excellent by itself.
  • Radicchio Part of the chicory family, its intense burgundy colour and distinct peppery flavour adds life to salads. It comes as a round cabbage-like head and as an elongated head (rather like Belgian endive) called Treviso radicchio.
  • Tatsoi Also known as spoon mustard, tatsoi is an Asian green. It has an interesting spoon-like leaf and a mildly peppery flavour. It is usually combined with other greens.
  • Watercress Watercress is a member of the nasturtium family and grows on the banks of streams. It has a distinctive spicy flavour and is a good addition to sandwiches, as well as salads.

Salads

Bonnie Stern’s hummus at home

Freshly made hummus is a treat. You will not be able to go back to buying it after you taste Bonnie’s recipe. If you are used to store bought, you should make some right away. It is so much better. There are many ways to make and serve hummus, but this is my go-to basic recipe. Serve as is or these are some of my favourite toppings: a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil or pure tahini a sprinkle of smoked paprika or chopped fresh cilantro or parsley dots of harissa or cilantro pesto or roasted cherry tomatoes or sautéed mushrooms spooned into the centre. Enjoy with pita bread, challah or vegetables for dipping. Follow Bonnie @bonniestern for more food inspiration.

Some notes: Canned chickpeas make hummus quick and easy to prepare, even at the last minute. Be sure to use good tahini if you taste it on its own, it should not leave a bitter aftertaste.

To cook dried chickpeas: Soak one cup overnight in lots of water with 1/2 teaspoon baking soda. Drain and rinse. Cook in lots of fresh water with another 1/2 teaspoon baking soda until very tender. Skim and discard any froth or chickpea skins that come to the surface. Start testing to see if they are tender after about 45 minutes, but it can take up to over an hour depending on how old they are, how long they soaked and many other things. Cook until very tender.

  • 2 cups cooked chickpeas, either canned (1 540mL/19oz can) or freshly cooked
  • 1/2 cup pure tahini (from the jar)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 small clove garlic, grated or minced
  • 1/4 cup ice water

Reserve about 1/4 cup chickpeas for topping. Place remaining chickpeas in a food processor and chop on/off.

Add tahini, salt, lemon juice, cumin, garlic and ice water. Process about 5 minutes or longer until exceptionally smooth, scraping down sides of bowl 2 or 3 times. (I set my timer for 5 minutes because I rarely have the machine on for so long.)

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Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and lemon juice. If it is too thick add a more ice water a little at a time.

Spread hummus over a serving dish, with a shallow dip in the centre. Sprinkle with reserved cooked chickpeas and any of the above optional toppings.

Radicchio with Green Goddess dressing topped with chicken thighs

This salad is an always appreciated main course when topped with grilled or fried chicken. I often add croutons when I have some on hand. Omit the chicken thighs if you want to serve it as a side salad. Other variations: Use pancetta instead of bacon, or add shrimp instead of chicken.

Green Goddess dressing

  • 2/3 cup chopped avocado
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup Greek yogurt
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped shallots
  • 1 tablespoon chives
  • 1 tablespoon tarragon
  • 1 tablespoon basil
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 chicken thighs
  • 1 small head radicchio
  • 2 head Belgian endive
  • 4 oz (125 g) thick cut bacon, fried until crisp
  • 1 cup grated Manchego cheese

Use a stick blender or food processor to combine avocado, oil, yogurt, lemon juice, shallots, chives, tarragon, basil, mustard and honey. Season with salt and pepper. (Keeps refrigerated a week.) Divide dressing in half. Place chicken thighs on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush half dressing over chicken thighs. Marinate thighs for 30 minutes. Reserve remaining dressing for salad. If it is too thick, whisk in 1 tablespoon water.

Preheat oven to 400 F. Bake thighs for 20 to 30 minutes or until cooked through and juices run clear. If skin is not crisp enough, broil for 2 minutes.

Divide salad onto 4 plates and toss with dressing. Place chicken thigh on top.

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Roasting potatoes for this salad gives more depth of flavour. Potato salads are much improved if you dress the potatoes while they are still hot so that they absorb the dressing rather than having it sit on top. Good additions are bacon, chopped anchovies or blanched green beans. Cut recipe in half for a small group of people.

  • 2 pounds mini red potatoes, cut in half
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon horseradish
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup red onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cup red pepper, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup parsley, chopped

Preheat oven to 400 F. Cut potatoes in half, but do not peel. Toss with oil and balsamic vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Place in baking dish and roast for 35 to 45 minutes or until browned and tender.

Combine mayonnaise, horseradish and lemon juice. Toss potatoes with onion, red pepper, and mayonnaise mixture. Sprinkle with parsley. Serve warm or room temperature.

Grilled little gem salad

Little gem lettuce is available at most supermarkets and green grocers. It is part of the romaine family, smaller and tastier. If unavailable, then use 3 small romaine lettuce cut half. There will be enough dressing leftover for another salad. If you prefer croutons, use them instead of the baguette slices. A few fried oysters or grilled shrimp on the side would be a great addition. Omit the onions if you do not like them.

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  • 3 anchovy fillets, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chopped garlic
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 3 tablespoon lemon juice
  • ½ cup shaved Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 6 heads of Little Gem lettuce
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 red onion, peeled
  • 4 slices baguette (1/2 inch thick)
  • 1 clove garlic, halved

Combine anchovies, chopped garlic, mayonnaise, Worcestershire and lemon juice. Crumble in 2 tablespoons Parmesan. Whisk in oil and season with salt and pepper.

Cut lettuce heads in half or in quarters if they are large. Brush with 2 tablespoons oil and season with salt and pepper.

Preheat grill on high. Grill the lettuce for about 1 to 2 minutes per side (with lid closed), or until charred but not limp. Reserve.

Cut red onion into thick rounds and brush with 1 tablespoon oil. Season with salt and pepper. Grill for about 3 minutes per side, or until limp and slightly charred. Cool and separate into rings.

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Grill bread for 1 minute per side, or until toasted. Remove from grill and brush with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Rub with halved garlic clove on both sides.

Place lettuce on a platter and pile onions alongside. Drizzle with dressing. Sprinkle with remaining 1/3 cup Parmesan and serve with the toasts on the side. If there is extra dressing, drizzle it around lettuce. Alternatively divide lettuce among 4 plates, pile a few onion rings beside each lettuce. Drizzle with dressing, Lay toast on the side.

Asian vegetable and herb salad

Add 4 ounces of soaked thin rice noodles to the vegetables for a noodle variation of this refreshing salad. Vary the vegetables using what you have on hand. I like it for lunch on its own, but it also pairs well with chicken or fish.

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 4 shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 red pepper, thinly sliced
  • 12 ounces thin asparagus stalks, sliced in 2-inch lengths
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 bunch spinach
  • 1 bunch watercress, stalks trimmed
  • 1 cup mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup coriander leaves

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  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon grated ginger
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

Heat oil in skillet on high heat. Add garlic, mushrooms, onions and red pepper. Stir fry for 1 minute, add asparagus and stir fry 2 minutes longer. Stir in soy sauce, salt, and pepper to taste. The vegetables should still be crisp. Cool.

Combine spinach, watercress, mint and coriander leaves on a platter. Scatter vegetable mixture over.

Whisk together dressing ingredients and toss with salad.

Desserts

Anna’s brown butter chocolate chip cookies

Makes about 16 to 18 cookies

Anna is my 15-year-old granddaughter who, during this pandemic, found she loved to cook and bake. She now bakes sourdough for her neighbourhood and makes these cookies for all of us. They are crisp around the edges and mellow in the middle, my favourite kind. Check her Instagram feed, @annasbalance, where she posts her adventures with food and workouts. The cookie dough can be made ahead and frozen in dough balls. Bake from frozen.

  • 1½ cups + 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¾ cup (1 ½ sticks) unsalted butter, divided
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar (packed)
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped, or semisweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 375 F, whisk together flour, salt and baking soda in a bowl.

Melt ½ cup (1 stick) butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat, mixing constantly until butter foams and then browns. about 6 minutes. Transfer butter to a large bowl and let sit for 1-2 minutes. Cube remaining ¼ cup (½ stick) butter into small pieces and add to the warm brown butter. Stir to dissolve.

Add both sugars to the butter and whisk until sugar is incorporated and no lumps remain. Whisk in egg and egg yolks until incorporated. Whisk in vanilla. Using a spatula, fold dry ingredients into the wet mixture just until incorporated, then fold in chocolate.

Rest dough in refrigerator in bowl for 10 minutes.

Using a cookie scoop (3 tablespoons) portion out about 16-18 balls of dough and divide between 2 parchment lined baking sheets. Bake cookies until deep golden brown and firm around the edges, 8-10 minutes. Let cool.

Tara O’Brady’s Calas (Creole rice fritters) with honeyed strawberry sauce

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Makes around 24 small or 18 large

Tara was introduced to calas through the work of culinary activist and Louisiana food historian Poppy Tooker. They are thought to have originated in rice-growing African nations. In the 1700s, they became a vital source of income for enslaved women in New Orleans who sold them in the streets on Sundays.

  • 2/3 cup long-grain white rice, cooked according to package directions
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste, or seeds scraped from a bean
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • Neutral oil, for frying
  • Cinnamon sugar, for dusting
  • 3 cups fresh strawberries, hulled and diced
  • 3 tablespoons honey, or more as needed
  • Juice from half a lemon
  • 3/4 cup thick yogurt or crème fraîche

Spread the cooked rice in a large, wide bowl.

Whip the eggs, sugar, salt and vanilla together until pale and about doubled in volume in a second bowl. In three additions, fold egg mixture into the cooked rice. Sift the flour, baking powder, cinnamon and nutmeg onto the rice mixture. Fold to combine. Let batter rest, covered, for 20 minutes.

To make the strawberry sauce, combine the strawberries, honey, and lemon juice in a medium, nonreactive saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, gently mashing the berries. Lower the heat to a simmer, and let bubble until glossy and thickened slightly, about 7 minutes. Remove from the heat and adjust sweetness if needed. Set aside to cool.

Pour enough oil into a heavy, deep saucepan to come up 2 to 3 inches up the sides. Heat oil over a medium heat to 365°F.

Using a spring-loaded scoop or two tablespoons, carefully drop balls of dough into the hot oil (using about 1 tablespoon batter for small calas, 4 teaspoons for large). Fry batches, turning calas often, until deeply golden and cooked through, 4 to 6 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, drain calas briefly before dredging in cinnamon sugar, then transferring to a baking rack or directly to a serving dish.

When ready to feast, swirl the strawberry sauce with the yogurt or crème fraîche and offer alongside the hot calas. To eat, tear your calas in two, then spoon a smear of strawberry-marbled yogurt on each half.

The calas are best the day they are made, preferably fresh from the fryer.


Delaware Girl Eats

Layered Salad with Green Goddess Dressing #SundaySupper

For over forty years the dinner bell has rung at our Hollywood Beach community for monthly summer potlucks.  As dinner is prepared some lounge on the deck of our community Clubhouse, gazing at sailboats passing on the nearby Elk River.  Others set up tables and assemble the potluck buffet. Neighbors gather until the bell is rung and then everyone surges inside, vying for a bite of their favorite potluck dishes like corn pudding or crab salad.  The noise level builds as serving dishes are emptied and eventually, having eaten their fill, folks spill back out onto the deck to savor sunset over the River.

Gatherings like these potlucks like these offer no-fuss dining while enjoying others’ dishes. But all perfect potluck dishes fit certain rules.   They must travel well, be heated in advance or served at room temperature, feed a crowd and easy to prepare. Whether they are classics like potato or pasta salad, or inventive side dishes they all offer a little something—whether it's an interesting ingredient or a smart prep technique—that sets them apart.

Which is why a layered salad is such a potluck stalwart. These can be among the most interesting-looking and widely appealing dishes on the table. Somehow, when everyday ingredients like lettuce, beets, potatoes, carrots, eggs, peas or chicken chunks are spread in layers in a glass bowl, they become a whole much greater than the sum of the parts.

I like to think of these as a free-form expression of garden delights, presenting layers of colors and textures so that the salad is as enticing to view its ingredients are tasty to eat.  For my layered salad the ingredient list below is really just a starting point.  Creativity and the availability of ingredients are the only limit to what might be included. And, to top off this salad experience, I am offering a well-loved topping from the past – Green Goddess dressing. Its bright lemony, herbal and creamy flavors complement any salad composition.

Layered Salad with Green Goddess Dressing

Ingredients:

  • 2 Heads Iceberg Lettuce, rinsed and cut
  • 5 Hard Boiled Eggs, quartered
  • 8 Cherry Tomatoes, quartered
  • ½ Red Onion, sliced
  • 8 oz Goat Cheese, Feta,Cheddar or other flavorful cheese
  • 1 10-oz bag of frozen peas, thawed or garden-fresh peas blanched
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Green Goddess Dressing:

  • 1 Cup Mayonnaise
  • 1 Cup Sour Cream
  • 2 Tsp Chopped Garlic
  • ¼ Cup Lemon Juice
  • ¼ Cup Basil Leaves, chopped
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Hopefully Hollywood Beach potlucks will continue for another forty years, but in the meanwhile please enjoy this collection of potluck recipes courtesy of Sunday Supper friends:

  • Calamari salad with fennel and avocado by Caroline’s Cooking
  • Coronation Chicken Deviled Eggs by Food Lust People Love
  • Creamy Ranch Tortilla Pinwheels with Roasted Red Peppers by Dizzy Busy and Hungry
  • Roasted Corn Salsa by Casa de Crews
  • Walnut Grapes by Eat, Drink and be Tracy
  • Watermelon Salad with Feta Cheese Recipe by April Golightly

Sides and Salads

  • Amish Broccoli and Cauliflower Salad by My World Simplified
  • Antipasto Pasta Salad by A Mind “Full” Mom
  • Arugula Pesto Pasta Salad with Grilled Chicken by Hardly A Goddess
  • Cheddar Bacon Ranch Potato Salad by Cupcakes & Kale Chips
  • Chopped Caprese Salad by Angels Home Sweet Homestead
  • Crunchy Coleslaw by A Day in the Life on the Farm
  • Cumin Scented Quinoa with Black Bean and Corn Salsa by The Hungry Goddess
  • Easy Summer Chickpea Salad by She Loves Biscotti
  • Elotes by Culinary Adventures with Camilla
  • Frog Eye Salad by Turnips 2 Tangerines
  • Gluten Free Grilled Corn Salad by Gluten Free Crumbley
  • Layered Salad with Green Goddess Dressing by Delaware Girl Eats
  • No Mayo Potato Salad by Simple and Savory
  • Roasted Vegetable Couscous Salad by My Life Cookbook
  • Spaghetti Salad with Italian Dressing by Kitchen Gidget
  • Summer Grain Salad by Pook’s Pantry
  • Summer Tortellini Salad by Palatable Pastime
  • Tarragon Marinated Veggies by Beauty and the Beets
  • Blueberry Ginger Parfaits by Cindy’s Recipes and Writings
  • Blueberry Slab Pie by The Chef Next Door
  • Caramel Icebox Cake by Cookin’ Mimi
  • Caramel Syrup “Doughnut” Cake by What Smells So Good?
  • Cherry Crumb Bars by The Redhead Baker
  • Chocolate Eclair Cake by Tramplingrose
  • Coconut Lime Ice Cream by Cosmopolitan Cornbread
  • Cookie Butter Caramel Swirl Brownies by Grumpy’s Honeybunch
  • Double Chocolate Blondies by Family Around The Table
  • Frozen Champagne Salad by Moore or Less Cooking
  • How to make a Pineapple Summer Cake by Asian In America
  • Lemon Icebox Bars by Hezzi-D’s Books and Cooks
  • Mini Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisps with Coconut by The Wimpy Vegetarian
  • No-Bake Summer Berry Cream Cheese Tarts by Magnolia Days
  • Peach Dumplings by Fantastical Sharing of Recipes
  • Peanut Butter Bars by Confessions of a Cooking Diva
  • S’mores Blondies by Alida’s Kitchen
  • Strawberry Pretzel Pie by My Imperfect Kitchen
  • Summertime S’Mores by The Freshman Cook
  • Triple Peanut Butter Cookies by Cooking With Carlee
  • White Sheet Cake by That Skinny Chick Can Bake
  • Whole Wheat Blueberry Galette by The Bitter Side of Sweet

Plus Lemon Yogurt Pound Cake and Best Potluck Dishes from Sunday Supper Movement Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board. Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement

Comments

For over forty years the dinner bell has rung at our Hollywood Beach community for monthly summer potlucks.  As dinner is prepared some lounge on the deck of our community Clubhouse, gazing at sailboats passing on the nearby Elk River.  Others set up tables and assemble the potluck buffet. Neighbors gather until the bell is rung and then everyone surges inside, vying for a bite of their favorite potluck dishes like corn pudding or crab salad.  The noise level builds as serving dishes are emptied and eventually, having eaten their fill, folks spill back out onto the deck to savor sunset over the River.

Gatherings like these potlucks like these offer no-fuss dining while enjoying others’ dishes. But all perfect potluck dishes fit certain rules.   They must travel well, be heated in advance or served at room temperature, feed a crowd and easy to prepare. Whether they are classics like potato or pasta salad, or inventive side dishes they all offer a little something—whether it's an interesting ingredient or a smart prep technique—that sets them apart.

Which is why a layered salad is such a potluck stalwart. These can be among the most interesting-looking and widely appealing dishes on the table. Somehow, when everyday ingredients like lettuce, beets, potatoes, carrots, eggs, peas or chicken chunks are spread in layers in a glass bowl, they become a whole much greater than the sum of the parts.

I like to think of these as a free-form expression of garden delights, presenting layers of colors and textures so that the salad is as enticing to view its ingredients are tasty to eat.  For my layered salad the ingredient list below is really just a starting point.  Creativity and the availability of ingredients are the only limit to what might be included. And, to top off this salad experience, I am offering a well-loved topping from the past – Green Goddess dressing. Its bright lemony, herbal and creamy flavors complement any salad composition.

Layered Salad with Green Goddess Dressing

Ingredients:

  • 2 Heads Iceberg Lettuce, rinsed and cut
  • 5 Hard Boiled Eggs, quartered
  • 8 Cherry Tomatoes, quartered
  • ½ Red Onion, sliced
  • 8 oz Goat Cheese, Feta,Cheddar or other flavorful cheese
  • 1 10-oz bag of frozen peas, thawed or garden-fresh peas blanched
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Green Goddess Dressing:

  • 1 Cup Mayonnaise
  • 1 Cup Sour Cream
  • 2 Tsp Chopped Garlic
  • ¼ Cup Lemon Juice
  • ¼ Cup Basil Leaves, chopped
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Hopefully Hollywood Beach potlucks will continue for another forty years, but in the meanwhile please enjoy this collection of potluck recipes courtesy of Sunday Supper friends:

  • Calamari salad with fennel and avocado by Caroline’s Cooking
  • Coronation Chicken Deviled Eggs by Food Lust People Love
  • Creamy Ranch Tortilla Pinwheels with Roasted Red Peppers by Dizzy Busy and Hungry
  • Roasted Corn Salsa by Casa de Crews
  • Walnut Grapes by Eat, Drink and be Tracy
  • Watermelon Salad with Feta Cheese Recipe by April Golightly

Sides and Salads

  • Amish Broccoli and Cauliflower Salad by My World Simplified
  • Antipasto Pasta Salad by A Mind “Full” Mom
  • Arugula Pesto Pasta Salad with Grilled Chicken by Hardly A Goddess
  • Cheddar Bacon Ranch Potato Salad by Cupcakes & Kale Chips
  • Chopped Caprese Salad by Angels Home Sweet Homestead
  • Crunchy Coleslaw by A Day in the Life on the Farm
  • Cumin Scented Quinoa with Black Bean and Corn Salsa by The Hungry Goddess
  • Easy Summer Chickpea Salad by She Loves Biscotti
  • Elotes by Culinary Adventures with Camilla
  • Frog Eye Salad by Turnips 2 Tangerines
  • Gluten Free Grilled Corn Salad by Gluten Free Crumbley
  • Layered Salad with Green Goddess Dressing by Delaware Girl Eats
  • No Mayo Potato Salad by Simple and Savory
  • Roasted Vegetable Couscous Salad by My Life Cookbook
  • Spaghetti Salad with Italian Dressing by Kitchen Gidget
  • Summer Grain Salad by Pook’s Pantry
  • Summer Tortellini Salad by Palatable Pastime
  • Tarragon Marinated Veggies by Beauty and the Beets
  • Blueberry Ginger Parfaits by Cindy’s Recipes and Writings
  • Blueberry Slab Pie by The Chef Next Door
  • Caramel Icebox Cake by Cookin’ Mimi
  • Caramel Syrup “Doughnut” Cake by What Smells So Good?
  • Cherry Crumb Bars by The Redhead Baker
  • Chocolate Eclair Cake by Tramplingrose
  • Coconut Lime Ice Cream by Cosmopolitan Cornbread
  • Cookie Butter Caramel Swirl Brownies by Grumpy’s Honeybunch
  • Double Chocolate Blondies by Family Around The Table
  • Frozen Champagne Salad by Moore or Less Cooking
  • How to make a Pineapple Summer Cake by Asian In America
  • Lemon Icebox Bars by Hezzi-D’s Books and Cooks
  • Mini Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisps with Coconut by The Wimpy Vegetarian
  • No-Bake Summer Berry Cream Cheese Tarts by Magnolia Days
  • Peach Dumplings by Fantastical Sharing of Recipes
  • Peanut Butter Bars by Confessions of a Cooking Diva
  • S’mores Blondies by Alida’s Kitchen
  • Strawberry Pretzel Pie by My Imperfect Kitchen
  • Summertime S’Mores by The Freshman Cook
  • Triple Peanut Butter Cookies by Cooking With Carlee
  • White Sheet Cake by That Skinny Chick Can Bake
  • Whole Wheat Blueberry Galette by The Bitter Side of Sweet

Plus Lemon Yogurt Pound Cake and Best Potluck Dishes from Sunday Supper Movement Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board. Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement


Green Goddess & Salmon Summer Bibb Wedge Salad

A twist on the classic iceberg wedge, this Green Goddess & Salmon Summer Wedge Salad is made with refreshing, crisp bibb lettuce instead. Topped with grilled salmon, fresh veggies, hard boiled eggs and a creamy green goddess dressing, this salad is a hearty and healthy!Happy hump day you guys! So, I finally made it to my new home in North Carolina! Not completely unscathed though. I broke my toe, seriously bruised my knee and I have got scrapes up and down one arm. (<&mdash Mix of bad luck and klutz like behavior)

Y&rsquoall, I freggin&rsquo LOVE it here!! Our house is awesome and tranquil, the Carolina atmosphere is relaxed and gorgeous, and the winding roads make me wanna say, &ldquoweeeeeeeee-eeeee!&rdquo while driving. I feel more at home here than any other city I have resided. Well, minus the mass chaos and clutter of endless boxes, of course!

But, I have a dilemma and I need a little advice, my friends. As I am unpacking boxes, in my brand spankin&rsquo new space, I don&rsquot know where to put anything. I am lacking a clear vision.

My mother in law is a pretty kick arse interior designer who is anxious to help (<&mdash Don&rsquot be jealous, she is for hire. Wink wink.), but I can&rsquot ask her to do evvvvvvery-thing. So, do you guys know of any good web sites for home inspiration? I have looked at Pinterest and I am a subscriber to apartment therapy&hellip so any suggestions other than those two would be Oh.Sooooo apprechiated! #HookMeUp

Anyways, on to today&rsquos dish &ndash Fully Loaded Bibb Wedge Salad With Grilled Salmon and Green Goddess Dressing. This salad is not only seriously scrum-did-a-lee-umptious, it is also easy and quick to throw together, doesn&rsquot require you turn on your oven and perfect if you have lost your mind (like me) because it&rsquos pretty dang simple.

I wanted to shake up the wedge a little bit and do something slightly outside the norm. Therefore, I replaced iceberg with my absolute favorite lettuce. Ever. Like, ever. Ever. Ever. Bibb lettuce &ndash or little gem, butter &ndash whatever you want to call it or whatever you have available. 🙂 I also nixed the traditional blue cheese dressing and substituted dreamy green goddess dressing. For toppings, I opted for summertime fresh veggies, hard boiled eggs, and simply grilled salmon for substance and a healthy dose of Omega-3&rsquos.

The result is a healthy, crisp, refreshingly cool salad that is packed with flavor &ndash crunchy, creamy, tangy, herby, a little smoky- and all around finger lickin&rsquo fantastically delicious. I am so smitten with this salad I have been eating it for all three meals- breakfast, lunch and dinner. Yes, I said breakfast. It is just.that.good.

But, this wedge is also customizable. You can substitute the salmon for chicken, ahi tuna, steak, shrimp or tofu. Also, add or subtract whatever topping ingredients float your boat, just don&rsquot 86 the dressing, it makes the salad. Some add-ins I have tried: sliced avocados, crumbled bacon, shaved Parmesan and freshly baked croutons. All of them rocked the house, so let your tummy be your guide!

Regardless of how you top this green goddess bibb wedge salad, I know you are going to love it and possibly even crave it for breakfast. 🙂 Until next time, Cheers and don&rsquot forget to hit me up with some home décor site suggestion- pretty, pretty please and thank you!