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World's 50 Best Restaurants Leaked?

World's 50 Best Restaurants Leaked?

Just an hour before the official announcement, Spanish newspaper El Imparcial lists the supposed top five

As we wait with bated breath for the 3 p.m. EST announcement of the World's 50 Best Restaurants, Spanish newspaper El Imperial jumps the gun and reports the top five. (Spoiler alert if you want to wait for the real announcement).

According to El Imperial, Noma, the reigning champ for three years, has been pushed out by Spain's El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain), which was number two on the list last year. The Catalan-centric restaurant has been on the list for seven years.

Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark) is reportedly in second place (rumored to have been pushed out thanks to the norovirus incident, among others), while Massimo Bottura's Osteria Francescana (Modena, Italy) jumps to third place from fifth. Mugaritz, also in Spain, is reportedly the fourth best restaurant in the world, and New York City's Eleven Madison Park in fifth place.

Watch the livestream of the announcement over at Fine Dining Lovers, or stay tuned on The Daily Meal for the complete list.


Twelve iconic dishes of El Bulli

The curtains have just been drawn on the 15 th Anniversary party for The World’s 50 Best Restaurants in Barcelona, presented by Miele – and what a celebration. After a special #50BestTalks event to discuss the future of gastronomy with five chef-owners of the list’s past and present No.1 restaurants, a celebratory lunch was hosted by legendary chef Ferran Adrià.

Together with a host of fellow Barcelona-based cooks, Adrià curated a special gastronomic experience on the terrace of the Bravo24 restaurant at the W Barcelona, with the likes of Massimo Bottura, Gastón Acurio, Will Guidara, Tetsuya Wakuda, Richard Ekkebus and Andoni Luis Aduriz among the esteemed guests.

As creator of El Bulli, the only restaurant ever to be awarded the title of The World’s Best Restaurant five times, Adrià has influenced a generation of cooks, including many of the superchefs present at the party. Although in 2011 El Bulli closed its doors, Adrià then created the El Bulli Foundation, which continues to teach the gastronomic world about the legacy and learnings of Adrià and his team.

To celebrate El Bulli’s success, we look back at the 12 iconic dishes that helped define one of the greatest restaurants of all time.

Gazpacho de bogavante (1989) – Lobster gazpacho

One of the first methods that marked El Bulli’s style was the adaptation of dishes from traditional cuisine to avant garde. The gazpacho de bogavante is an innovative version of a traditional dish served in a revolutionary way, called sopa emplatada. A salad garnish is prepared in the kitchen and presented at the table, and the waiter later serves the gazpacho over the garnish.

Granizado salado de tomate con orégano fresco y manjar blanco (1992) – Savoury tomato water ice with fresh oregano and almond milk pudding

This plate combines a number of features of El Bulli’s style in the Nineties. The tomato water ice is the first example of frozen savoury cuisine and there is a new symbiosis between sweet and savoury, overcoming the boundaries previously found between mains and puddings. It is also an example of cocina enmoldada: the preparation is served in a container similar to a champagne glass, which supports its light texture.

Espuma de judías blancas con erizos: la primera espuma (1994) - White bean espuma with sea urchins: the first foam

It was the search for a texture lighter than mousse, which could also carry stronger flavours, that led to the creation of foams – the key piece of the puzzle being the discovery that they could be prepared using a cream whipper. White bean foam was the first ever served at El Bulli. It is the result of a technical-conceptual investigation in gastronomy that later led to such inventions as warm gelatine, frozen powder, air and spherification, which defined El Bulli’s cuisine in the years to come.

La menestra de verduras en texturas (1994) - Textured vegetable panache

This was a landmark dish in El Bulli’s cuisine as it set a new path for the development of the restaurant’s cuisine from 1994 onwards. In this panache, the vegetables are presented in different textures, in a definitive cut-off from the previous style, El sabor del Mediterráneo (the taste of the Mediterranean).

Dos formas de presentar el pollo al curry (1995) – Two ways of presenting chicken curry

In 1995, a number of traditional recipes made their debut on El Bulli’s menu, while being revolutionised in the process. The appearance of such dishes as pollo al curry (chicken curry), arroz a la cubana (Cuban-style white rice) and espinacas a la catalana (Catalan-style spinach) had little in common with the classics. In the process of deconstruction, the original dish was rebuilt as each ingredient (in this case chicken, apple, curry, coconut, garlic and onion) had undergone a different treatment, such as being texturised or radically modified.

Huevo de codorniz caramelizado (1996) – Caramelised quail’s egg

Due to its subjective character, minimalism is perhaps the most difficult style to define. According to El Bulli, it could be said that a minimalist dish is one that creates the most magic with the least ingredients. The best example of this is the minimalismo de bocado, where all the magic is conveyed in a single mouthful. The huevo de codorniz caramelizado consists of a poached quail’s egg caramelised through a special technique developed in 1996, which creates a crunchy bite with a liquid centre.

El plato de las especias (1996) – The spice dish

New parameters were added with the introduction of the ‘sixth sense’ in El Bulli‘s cuisine. It wasn’t only about pleasure of the senses, but also intellectual appreciation of the dish. Two important parts of the sixth sense are playfulness and irony, both found in the plato de las especias. A green apple jelly serves as ‘support’ for twelve spices and aromatic herbs. The names of these are revealed to the diner, but not their order: this is how the idea of play made its entrance into El Bulli’s cuisine.

Espuma de humo (1997) – Smoke foam

Another parameter of the sixth sense is provocation. In 1997, when the debate about foams was at its height, El Bulli served a snack that was specially created to provoke a reaction in the diner. The espuma de humo is a small glass filled with smoked water foam and served with oil, salt and croutons. The idea was for the diner to ‘eat smoke’.

Sopa de guisantes 60º/4º (1999) – Pea soup 60º/4º

Taste is the sense that most comes into play in the world of cuisine, but the importance of the other four for sensory stimulation has often been overlooked. The sensation created by the sopa de guisantes is based on the contrast of temperatures between hot and cold liquid. It is a clear example of one of the defining features of El Bulli cuisine: multi-sensoriality.

Caviar sférico de melón (2003) – Spherical melon caviar

The use of sodium alginate in the spherification process opened the doors to a dozen new texturising products. Basic spherification is the controlled jellifying process of a liquid mixed with alginate that, upon contact with calcium salts, produces spheres of different textures and consistencies. This technique characterised El Bulli’s cuisine in later years, and the caviar sférico de melón is one of its most emblematic snacks.

Deshielo (2004) – Thaw

From 2003, El Bulli created a number of dishes inspired by nature, such as tierra (earth), nieve (snow) and deshielo (thaw). It was soon recognised that they formed part of a new style, which was subsequently called natura (nature). Deshielo was inspired by a photo of the ice melting in spring with the first shoots sprouting out of the frozen blanket.

Pistacho-LYO con consomé gelé de trufa negra y aire de mandarina (2005) – Pistachio-LYO with black truffle jellied consommé and mandarin air

Some of the latest developments in contemporary cuisine were made possible by the dialogue between science and gastronomy, mediated by the food industry. Freeze-drying exemplified this new trend, using techniques that hadn’t previously been applied due to the lack of suitable technology, as exemplified in this dish.

Inspired by El Bulli? Watch this video on the 15 th Anniversary of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, featuring some of the key moments of the last decade and a half:


Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube for highlights from our 15th Anniversary celebrations, presented by Miele.


The World's 50 Best Restaurants List 2013 LEAKED

Spoiler alert, everybody: according to Spanish newspaper El Imparcial, the top five restaurants on this year's S. Pellegrino World's 50 Best list are as follows:

1. El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain
2. Noma, Copenhagen, Denmark
3. Osteria Francescana, Modena, Italy
4. Mugaritz, Errenteria, Spain
5. Eleven Madison Park, New York City

Obviously, if this intel is correct it is a major upset, with El Celler de Can Roca pushing Noma out of its number one slot. Noma was first crowned number one by S. Pellegrino in 2010, when it took the title from Spain's elBulli. A rumor floated earlier this year the Noma would be ousted by Tokyo's Narisawa, but it seems the honor is going back to Spain. Also of note is EMP moving up from last year's #10 slot to #5.

UPDATE #2: The list was correct, here are the winners of the 2013 World's 50 Best Restaurants.

The Entire World's 50 Best Restaurants List 2013

1. El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, España
2. Noma Copenhague, Dinamarca
3. Osteria Francescana Modena, Italia
4. Mugaritz San Sebastián, España
5. Eleven Madison Park Nueva York, EE UU
6. D.O.M. São Paulo, Brasil
7. Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, Londres, Gran Bretaña
8. Arzak San Sebastián, España
9. Steirereck Viena, Austria
10. Vendôme Bergisch Gladbach, Alemania
11. Per Se Nueva York, EE UU
12. Frantzén/Lindeberg Estocolomo, Suecia
13. The Ledbury Londres, Gran Bretaña
14. Astrid y Gastón Lima, Perú
15. Alinea Chicago, EE UU
16. L'Arpège París, Francia
17. Pujol México DF, México
18. Le Chateaubriand París, Francia
19. Le Bernardin Nueva York, EE UU
20. Narisawa Tokio, Japón
21. Attica Melbourne, Australia
22. Nihonryori RyuGin Tokio, Japón
23. L'Astrance París, Francia
24. L'Atelier Saint-Germain de Joël Robuchon París, Francia
25. Hof Van Cleve Kruishoutem, Bélgica
26. Quique Dacosta Dénia, España
27. Le Calandre Rubano, Italia
28. Mirazur Menton, Francia
29. Daniel Nueva York, EE UU
30. Aqua Wolfsburg, Alemania
31. Biko México DF, México
32. Nahm Bangkok, Tailandia
33. The Fat Duck Bray, Gran Bretaña
34. Fäviken Järpen, Suecia
35. Oud Sluis Sluis, the Netherlands
36. Amber Hong Kong, China
37. Vila Joya Albufeira, Portugal
38. Restaurant Andre Singapur
39. 8 1/2 Otto E Mezzo Bombana Hong Kong, China
40. Combal.Zero Rivoli, Italia
41. Piazza Duomo Alba, Italia
42. Schloss Schauenstein Fürstenau, Suiza
43. Mr & Mrs Bund Shanghai, China
44. Asador Etxebarri Atxondo, España
45. Geranium Copenhagen, Dinamarca
46. Mani São Paulo, Brasil
47. The French Laundry Yountville, EE UU
48. Quay Sydney, Australia
49. Septime París, Francia
50. Central Lima, Perú

UPDATE #2: The list was correct, here are the winners of the 2013 World's 50 Best Restaurants.


World’s 50 Best Restaurants publishes e-book of recipes by award-winning chefs

Fifty chefs have contributed recipes to the World's 50 Best Restaurants lockdown cookbook. — Picture via AFP-Relaxnews

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NEW YORK, July 3 — Alain Passard, André Chiang, Cho Hee-sook. Some 50 celebrity chefs from the world’s highest ranked restaurants are contributing lockdown recipes to an electronic book, which is being published to raise funds for the restaurant sector, which has been hard-hit by the ongoing health crisis.

With inspiration from places as far apart as South Korea, France and the city of San Francisco, the new e-book offers an opportunity to make your own home-cooked versions of dishes prepared by celebrated chefs from all over the world during the lockdown. Entitled Home Comforts - simple lockdown recipes from the world’s best chefs and bartenders, the new e-book is not revealing closely guarded secrets of signature dishes, but a wealth of good ideas to feed the family. Sorted into categories of different types of dishes, “50 Best” is promising that recipes are suitable for amateur cooks of all levels.

To get your hands on a copy of the new publication, you simply have to connect to www.50BestForRecovery.com and donate the sum of ten dollars.

The funds raised will go to 50 Best’s Recovery Fund to help restaurateurs to overcome the enormous economic challenges prompted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Amateur cooks are also being invited to share photos of their dishes on social networks accompanied by the hashtag 50BestRateMyPlate. Starting on July 20, the organizers of the ranking will be choosing their favourite dishes to share on their account. Every week, the dish that gains the most votes will be designated as a finalist. In all, five dishes will be in competition to win two invitations for the next World’s 50 Best Awards ceremony, which will be held in Antwerp (Belgium) in 2021. — AFP-Relaxnews


World’s 50 Best Restaurants publishes e-book of recipes by award-winning chefs

Alain Passard, André Chiang, Cho Hee-sook… Some 50 celebrity chefs from the world’s highest ranked restaurants are contributing lockdown recipes to an e-book, which is being published to raise funds for the restaurant sector, which has been hard-hit by the ongoing health crisis.

With inspiration from places as far apart as South Korea, France and the city of San Francisco, the new e-book offers an opportunity to make your own home-cooked versions of dishes prepared by celebrated chefs from all over the world during the lockdown. Entitled “Home Comforts – simple lockdown recipes from the world’s best chefs and bartenders,” the new e-book is not revealing closely guarded secrets of signature dishes, but a wealth of good ideas to feed the family. Sorted into categories of different types of dishes, 󈬢 Best” is promising that recipes are suitable for amateur cooks of all levels.

(Image credit: The World’s 50 Best Restaurants)

To get your hands on a copy of the new publication, you simply have to connect to 50BestForRecovery.com and donate the sum of ten dollars.

The funds raised will go to 50 Best’s Recovery Fund to help restaurateurs to overcome the enormous economic challenges prompted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Amateur cooks are also being invited to share photos of their dishes on social networks accompanied by the hashtag 50BestRateMyPlate. Starting on July 20, the organisers of the ranking will be choosing their favourite dishes to share on their account. Every week, the dish that gains the most votes will be designated as a finalist. In all, five dishes will be in competition to win two invitations for the next World’s 50 Best Awards ceremony, which will be held in Antwerp (Belgium) in 2021.


3. Atelier Crenn, a lauded French restaurant in San Francisco, has made its first appearance on the list at 35th.

Making its very first appearance in the World's 50 Best is Atelier Crenn, a lauded French restaurant that has taken the 35th spot. It is one of two San Francisco establishments to make this year's list.

Many might recognize head chef Dominique Crenn from the second season of "Chef's Table," when she gave viewers a peek into her very personal restaurant.

The unique tasting menu — which costs $335 per person — is written as a poem. Each dish that comes out of the kitchen interprets a different verse. It is an intimate dining experience, with only eight tables in the restaurant and two rotations a night. "I'm not serving a menu, I'm serving a story," Crenn said during the "Chef's Table" episode. "I'm serving my soul."

Crenn was the first female chef in the US to achieve two Michelin stars, an honor she received in 2012. Last year, she earned three. In 2016, Crenn was dubbed "World's Best Female Chef", an award she called "stupid."

"You can promote women in a different way," she said. "A chef is a chef."

After her restaurant was honored on Tuesday, Crenn — who is currently undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer — praised the group for bringing equality to the 1,000-member voting panel (which is now 50% female and 50% male) while noting there was "still more work to be done."

"I recognize that these things take time," she wrote on an Instagram post. "Equality and transparency are two of the most important qualities we can hope to see in any organization — in the world as a whole."


World's 50 Best Restaurants 2103 list is leaked as Spain ousts the Danes

There's always a lot of talk in the run-up to the announcement of the World's 50 Best Restaurants list about who will be No 1. And this year, more than a few were predicting a shake up in the arrangement in the top five positions saying that El Celler de Can Roca would topple Noma for the prime spot. Well that appears to be the case as two Spanish newspapers, first El Imparcial followed by El Pais have now broken the embargo and reported the Top 50:

1. El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain
2. Noma, Copenhagen, Denmark
3. Osteria Francescana, Modena, Italy
4. Mugaritz, Errenteria, Spain
5. Eleven Madison Park, New York City, USA
6. D.O.M. São Paulo, Brazil
7. Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, London, UK
8. Arzak, San Sebastián, Spain
9. Steirereck, Vienna, Austria
10. Vendôme, Bergisch, Gladbach, Germany

So it's a big day for Spanish gastronomy as they leap into the international spotlight that Denmark has enjoyed for the past three years. Of course, they may be forgiven for taking the view that they're only taking back what was rightfully theirs as before Noma it was another Spanish restaurant El Bulli that topped the list for many years.

But what's so special about El Celler de Can Roca? We asked food blogger Chris Pople who made the trip to Girona last year and recalls dishes like "caramelised olives hanging from miniature bonsai olive trees and disassembled local prawn served with deep-fried legs and prawn powder. eating in the modernist Can Roca dining room is an experience like no other. Too often internationally famous restaurants tend to serve strange, alien food disassociated from local culinary tradition - the genius of Can Roca is serving food that is astonishingly inventive yet still feels Catalan. A worthy winner."

As for UK restaurants, while Heston Blumenthal's Dinner went up two places to No 7 and The Ledbury rose from 14 to 13, the Fat Duck dropped 20 places to number 33. The UK total in the Top 50 remains unchanged. That said, there were a few more interesting UK moves within the Top 100 list. New entries were Hedone at number 70 and Pollen Street Social at No 84. St John re-entered the list at 71 and Viajante leapt up 21 places to 59.


Everyone's Favorite Restaurant at The Culinary Institute of America Just Got Better

The school's casual Apple Pie Bakery Café just received a significant upgrade, and if you've never been, now's the time.

For anyone who cares about food even a tiny bit, a visit to the Culinary Institute of America is always a great idea𠅍ropping by the school&aposs world-famous Hudson Valley campus, barely two hours north of New York City, feels a little bit like boarding the mothership. For most people, making the pilgrimage has long been associated with a meal at one of the CIA&aposs fine dining establishments, each one of them a training ground for (hopefully) the next generation of greats. For roughly twenty years now, however, the school has also been home to a decidedly less-involved dining experience that&aposs never had any trouble drawing a crowd—the cozy, come-as-you-are, Apple Pie Bakery Café.

The café, an all-day affair, began as a place to pick up pastries, sandwiches, coffee, and other quick bites for most of its life, the Apple Pie was a relentlessly casual place, its popularity with faculty, students, in-the-know locals and day-trippers nearly always guaranteeing long lines. They&aposd pile in for great sandwiches, salads, crocks of macaroni and cheese, hearty soups, truffle fries, and entertainingly over-the-top desserts. The menu always felt as blissfully 1990&aposs as the space itself, with its warm wood grains, soft lighting, cloth hangings and colorful tile floors. In any season, views out into the courtyard of Roth Hall, that historic pile at the heart of campus where the café is located, never failed to add to the experience.

Stopping in for lunch was always great fun, but the café&aposs immediate and unwavering popularity dictated that something, eventually, would have to be done to relieve overcrowding. So, it was not surprising to hear the long-overdue news, last year, that the Institute would be shuttering the space, in order to completely rethink things.

Luckily, they had just the guys hanging around to help�signer Adam Tihany is known around the world for his restaurant interiors, but he has also been the Art Director at the Institute since 2011 Chef Waldy Malouf, famously the chef-owner of Manhattan&aposs Beacon Restaurant for many years, is now the CIA&aposs head of food and beverage operations. After a few short months and with few details leaked along the way, the Apple Pie Café reopened to the public this week, just hours before the beginning of an epic snowstorm. It didn&apost matter𠅎veryone showed up, and even though they had to close for a day in order to dig out, everybody who hadn&apost come on the first day seemed to be there waiting, the moment the roads were cleared.

Stepping into the reinvigorated space feels like a first visit to a new restaurant, one you&aposre pretty sure you&aposre going to love. Gone are the cloth hangings, the bare wood, the low light𠅎verything is bright, light, freshly painted, more vibrant, more lively, but no less warm and welcoming. Waiting in line for your lunch is no longer necessary, and that&aposs perhaps the most important change𠅏or anyone dining in, there&aposs now table service, and quite good table service at that. Grabbing and going can still be done, but the counter area has now been broken out as a separate section. Essentially, where there was once one venue, there are now two.

The menu features many of the same classics—the seasonal soups are still there, the other day, a cold weather-appropriate cauliflower puree seemed to be on most tables. The macaroni and cheese ($13) is recognizable, but appears to have received an upgrade𠅊n oversized crock brims with cavatappi pasta, a sauce made with sharp, local white cheddar, and an aromatic persillade. There&aposs some seriously fancy food, too𠅊n artfully-done poke bowl ($14), a many-textured root vegetable salad ($11) that’s magazine cover-ready, a fascinating starter that&aposs essentially a baked beet volcano erupting crème fraiche, showered in savory granola ($6). Back on the comfort side of things, the chicken pot pie ($14) is perfectly rich, with a sneaky (and welcomed) cheesy pastry crust of course you can, like always, get the quiche of the day with a little side salad. The selection of desserts ($7) is almost longer than the list of main courses, and every single one of them seems ready to fight the other for pride of place in a Parisian patisserie.

Place mats on the tables provided a key to two new art installations, walls of china plates decorated with caricatures of various food celebrities from throughout the years. Here you will see everyone from Fannie Farmer and James Beard to René Redzepi and Enrique Olvera an extensive drinks menu includes on-tap beers from the in-house brewery, located down by the Hudson River, inside the envy-inducing student center, which is open to the public on weekends. While the café is now a proper restaurant, you don&apost need reservations for lunch—you just need to be aware of the hours: Monday through Friday only, while classes are in session. And if they&aposre really busy, no worries—there&aposs always takeout.


These Are The 10 Best Restaurants in The World

E ach year, fine diners, restaurateurs and food writers&mdashI’m in the last group&mdashtry to read the annual World&rsquos 50 Best Restaurant list like tea leaves, searching for trends, or at the very least, a coherent theme. But as in previous years, the 2014 edition, which was announced in London late last month, defies unifying logic. The restaurants that made the full list of 100 range from David Chang&rsquos decidedly informal and unsedate Momofuku Ssam Bar, to Alain Ducasse&rsquos paragon of plushness, Louis XIV, in Monaco. That said, in the past several years, the highest-ranking positions have tended to go to restaurants that balance at least a degree of luxury (although not always formal, none of them are cheap) with an embrace of innovation.

Such is the influence of the 50 Best that once a restaurant reaches the upper echelons of the list, its already sparse reservations become exceedingly difficult to come by. Several of the top places only allow bookings well in advance (for Noma it&rsquos 3 months for Eleven Madison it’s 28 days), and reservations disappear within minutes, so it helps to be online or on the phone as soon as they&rsquore released. But if a quick hand with reservations website OpenTable or the cellphone doesn&rsquot yield the desired results, there&rsquos another possibility: Email the restaurant, give a range of dates when you&rsquore available (the more flexible you are, the better your chances), and ask politely to be put on the wait list. Even the best restaurants frequently get cancellations.

Here’s a quick look at the top ten on this year’s 50 Best List. In most cases, the descriptions are based on my personal experience, but research and&mdashthe reports of colleagues&mdashhave filled in the details for the restaurants I haven&rsquot visited.

1. Noma, (Copenhagen, Denmark). Cost of a meal for two, without wine: $600.

After losing the top ranking in 2013 (it had held the No. spot for the three previous years), Noma is firing on all cylinders these days. Located in an old whaling warehouse, the restaurant is the birthplace of &ldquonew Nordic&rdquo cuisine, which relies solely on ingredients available in region. But today, the restaurant is pushing far beyond its early days of foraged sea buckthorn and reindeer lichen. Dinner these days might start with a whole kohlrabi, filled with its fermented juice and bored with a straw, so that it looks and tastes like a coconut drink. The meal might then proceed through aebleskivers &ndasha traditional Danish kind of fritter&mdashbrushed with a sauce made from fermented grasshopper, and end with a dessert of potato, almond, and plum purée. It sounds wacky, but somehow Redzepi and his crew manage to make it all delicious. As well as deeply pleasurable: Noma continues to offer what may well be the most engaged&mdashand engaging&mdashservice in the world.

2. Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain. Cost of a meal for two, without wine: $390-480.

Celler de Can Roca is run by three brothers &mdash head chef Joan, sommelier Josep, and pastry chef Jordi &mdash who came by their trade honestly: they learned it from their parents. But it&rsquos hard to imagine anything further from your average mom and pop cooking. In what may very well be the most beautiful dining room in Europe, a Roca meal dazzles with its wizardry (a starter called Eat The World that encapsulates, in five distinct bites, the tastes of the five different cuisines a dessert called Messi&rsquos Goal, that recreates, with a candied pitch, flying white chocolate balls, and a plateside iPod playing the roars of the crowd, what it feels like when Barcelona’s soccer hero Lionel Messi scores), while remaining firmly rooted in the flavors of the Mediterranean. Josep brings lucky guests on a tour of his cellar, where favorite wines have been singled out for multi-sensory treatments.

3. Osteria Francescana, Modena, Italy. Cost of a meal for two, without wine: $360-525.

Behind a stately exterior, the world&rsquos most emotive chef, Massimo Bottura, cooks flights of fantasy and memory. The first sign that this is not your ordinary upscale Italian restaurant comes from the abstract contemporary paintings on the wall, but the art continues on the plate. The mortadella sandwich of every Italian child&rsquos memory is turned into an impossibly light mousse, a Magnum ice cream bar becomes a sophisticated, foie-gras stuffed bite. And like his spectacular lacquered eel, which Bottura serves with saba and polenta to represent the apples and corn the eel would encounter on its way up the nearby Po river, his dishes are made more evocative by the stories that accompany them.

4. Eleven Madison Park, New York, USA. Cost of a meal for two, without wine: $450.

In this hushed yet theatrical dining room, Swiss-born chef Daniel Humm takes the whole farm-to-table movement, imbues it with a bit of French savoir-faire, and, like an alchemist, comes out with the quintessential New York restaurant. Indeed, the sense of place here comes not just from the locally grown and produced ingredients, but from Humm&rsquos knowing nod to New York&rsquos culinary culture. Pristine carrots, for example, get turned into a lightly whimsical take on steak tartare sturgeon (brought to the table under a smoke-filled cloche) is served with the restaurant&rsquos take on an everything bagel. Excellent service &mdash graceful, attentive, modern &mdash adds to the sense of supreme well-being.

5. Dinner. London, England. Cost of a meal for two, without wine: $230.

Heston Blumenthal took his fascination with English culinary history and turned it into something unexpectedly interesting for the rest of us. At the fashionable Dinner, located at the Mandarin Oriental hotel in London and overseen by chef Ashley Palmer-Watts, traditional (if quirkily named) dishes like Salamugundy and meat fruit are transformed into modern-day marvels (the latter into a light but rich chicken liver parfait, made up to look exactly like a mandarin orange) Is it indeed the U.K.&rsquos best restaurant? Probably not. But as history lessons go, this one goes down extremely easily.

6. Mugaritz, Errenteria, Spain. Cost of meal for two, without wine: $470.

Andoni Luis Aduriz is the Aristotle of contemporary cuisine, a philosopher-king tucked away in the rolling hills of the Basque Country, about 20 minutes drive from San Sebastian. Cerebral, technically accomplished dishes like the Bloody Mary tomato (which looks and feels like a fresh tomato, but tastes of the cocktail), or his famous potato stones (whose river rock appearance gives the diner the uncomfortable sensation of being about to break her teeth), he manages to consistently surprise and delight his customers, all while maintaining a deep, almost pantheistic reverence for the nature around him.

7. D.O.M. Saõ Paulo, Brazil. Cost of meal for two, without wine: $400.

Given the media&rsquos predilection for depicting chef Alex Atala standing thigh-deep in his much-loved Amazon, bare-chested and draped with a giant fish like some kind of latter-day Tarzan, it comes as something of a surprise that his restaurant is so refined. But the delicacy of signature dishes, like a pappardelle made from hearts of palm or a ceviche crafted of indigenous flavors, belies the wallop of their unusual flavors &mdash and has helped Brazilians discover the bounty of their native terroir. Even the Amazonian ants he serves, redolent of lemongrass and placed gently atop a cube of pineapple, seem elegant.

8. Arzak. San Sebastian, Spain. Cost of meal for two, without wine: $530.

Juan Mari Arzak is one of the great geniuses of Spanish gastronomy, among the first to bring modern techniques and flavors to bear on regional cuisine &mdash in his case, that of his native Basque Country. The kitchen of his restaurant, which is housed in a quaint-looking building but is surprisingly sleek inside, is now run largely by his daughter Elena. She continues the Basque-inflected innovation, with dishes like &ldquowaves&rdquo (they&rsquore created with molds) of local spider crab and anise or monkfish cooked in a balloon of edible green papier-máche that manage to feel both regionally grounded and whimsical.

9. Alinea, Chicago, Illinois. Cost of a meal for two, without wine: $420.

Grant Achatz did a brief stint at Ferran Adrià&rsquos elBulli, and ever since has been out avant-garding what was once the most avant-garde restaurant in the world. The 18-or-so-course tasting menu carries titles like &ldquoScallop Acting Like Agedashi Tofu&rdquo and the tableware &mdash some of it lovely, some of it looking like it was lifted from the spike-and-pincer collection of the Spanish Inquisition&mdash is tailor-made for each course. Dinner in this Chicago restaurant consists of carefully-scripted experiences more than dishes: one course requires the diner to fold her own ravioli from a sheet of tomato pasta that, moments before, looked to be a decorative flag, while the final dessert, a mix of dark chocolate and about a hundred other things, is painted, drizzled and scattered by a chef directly on the table itself.

10. The Ledbury, London, England. Cost of a meal for two, without wine: $270.

Among the top ten restaurants, the Ledbury is probably the most classical, which is to say that its chef, Australian-born Brett Graham, is more interested in pleasure than wizardry. The dishes served in this London restaurant may not be as visually striking as in other places, but their flavors are deep and layered. Case in point: a buffalo milk curd, spread creamily onto crisp toasts that are topped with Iberico ham and served with a rich onion broth. Or grilled mackerel, its oily brine mellowed with cured avocado and brightened with shiso. And with a chef who hunts his own wild birds, this is the place in London to try game.


Dominique Crenn Masterfully Responds to Sexist Question at World's 50 Best Panel

Dominique Crenn is armed and ready for thoughtless questions about her personal life. At a recent panel where the San Francisco-based chef of two-Michelin-starred Atelier Crenn and Eater 2016 Best New Restaurant Petit Crenn was speaking, a man in the audience asked her if she felt like she missed out on “the very important role of being a mother to children,” reports Australian site 9Kitchen. In her response, Crenn pointed out that she does in fact have kids, exposing the biases at play in asking the only woman on the panel about work-family balance.

Before dropping the bombshell that she is a mother, the Chef’s Table star first turned the tables on the speaker, asking if he had assumed that she didn’t have children just because she is a successful female chef. After revealing that she has twin daughters, a detail that has clearly done little to affect her status as an internationally renowned chef, she told the man: "If you have kids, I hope you stay home with them, so that your wife can go out and be a bad-ass woman." The crowd erupted in applause.

The panel on which Crenn was speaking was hosted Saturday by the World’s 50 Best Restaurants (a lead-up event to the big reveal of this year’s list on Wednesday). At the Sydney event, Crenn, who was named the World’s Best Female Chef 2016 by the very same organization — and who finally broke onto the main list at no. 83 this year — also pointed out earlier in the discussion that it’s not just women who have to weigh decisions of career and family.

Before the audience Q&A, Panelist Brett Graham, chef of London restaurant the Ledbury, HAD noted that many of his female chefs have had to leave the kitchen to pursue motherhood. 9Kitchen reports that Crenn responded, “We need to stop pretending that we are all the same, but I also think we need to change the conversation around this.”

Crenn elaborated that to her, changing the conversation means acknowledging that making serious, daily choices about career and personal life is not exclusive to women — or chefs.


50 Panini

Build your perfect sandwich with these hot-off-the-press ideas from Food Network Magazine.

Related To:

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©Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

How to Cook Panini
In a panini press: Preheat the press. Add your sandwich and cook according to the manufacturer's instructions until golden and crisp, 3 to 5 minutes.

On the stove: Preheat a skillet with butter or oil to medium low. Add your sandwich, then press a heavy pan on top to weigh it down. Cook until golden and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes per side.

1. Caprese Brush the inside of a split sub roll or sliced Italian bread with olive oil. Fill with 2 slices each fresh mozzarella and tomato, and a few basil leaves season with salt and pepper. Press and cook until golden.

2. Smoked Caprese Make Caprese Panini (No. 1) with smoked mozzarella.

3. Eggplant-Mozzarella Make Caprese Panini (No. 1) with smoked or fresh mozzarella replace the tomato with grilled eggplant slices.

4. Anchovy Caprese Make Caprese Panini (No. 1), adding 1/2 chopped anchovy fillet and a sprinkle of capers to the sandwich.

5. Prosciutto Caprese Make Caprese Panini (No. 1), adding 3 thin slices prosciutto and some shaved Parmesan to the sandwich.

6. Pesto Turkey Make Caprese Panini (No. 1) brush the inside of the roll with pesto instead of olive oil and add 3 or 4 slices roasted turkey breast to the sandwich.

FNM_oct10_062810-070.tif

©Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

7. Chicken Saltimbocca Brush the inside of a split ciabatta roll with pesto. Fill with sliced grilled chicken, fontina and prosciutto, and chopped fresh sage. Press and cook until golden.

8. Apple-Manchego Brush the inside of a split soft roll with olive oil and quince paste or fig jam. Fill with sliced apple and manchego cheese season with salt. Press and cook until golden.

FNM_oct10_062810-137.tif

©Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

9. Chorizo-Pear Make Apple-Manchego Panini (No. 8) with sliced pear instead of apple add sliced Spanish chorizo to the sandwich.

FNM_oct10_062810-155.tif

©Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

10. Roast Beef–Onion Spread Dijon mustard on 2 thick slices of sourdough bread. Layer shredded Gruyere, sliced roast beef, caramelized onions and more Gruyere between the bread. Press and cook until golden.

11. Three-Meat Brush the inside of a split Italian roll with olive oil. Fill with sliced soppressata, capicola, salami, fontina and roasted red peppers. Press and cook until golden.

12. Bacon-Date Brush the inside of a split French roll with olive oil and spread with soft goat cheese. Fill with chopped dates and crisp bacon. Press and cook until golden.

13. Grilled Veggie Brush the inside of a split ciabatta roll with pesto. Fill with slices of grilled eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash and roasted red peppers. Add 2 slices fresh mozzarella and a few basil leaves. Press and cook until golden.

14. Serrano-Fig Brush the inside of a split piece of baguette with olive oil and fig jam. Fill with thinly sliced serrano ham and manchego cheese. Press and cook until golden.

15. Three-Cheese Brush the inside of a split ciabatta roll with pesto. Fill with a few slices each of mozzarella, fontina and asiago. Add a few basil leaves. Press and cook until golden.

16. Sun-Dried Tomato Make Three-Cheese Panini (No. 15) with sun-dried tomato pesto. Add baby spinach instead of basil.

17. Mortadella-Ricotta Mix 2 tablespoons ricotta with some salt, pepper, and chopped thyme and parsley. Brush the insides of 2 slices crusty Italian bread with olive oil. Fill with the ricotta and sliced mortadella press and cook until golden.

18. Mortadella-Artichoke Make Mortadella-Ricotta Panini (No. 17), adding grilled marinated artichoke hearts.

19. Mushroom-Taleggio Brush the inside of a split crusty Italian roll with olive oil season with salt and pepper. Fill with sauteed mixed mushrooms and sliced onion. Add sliced taleggio cheese. Press and cook until golden.

FNM_oct10_062810-054.tif

©Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

Marcus Nilsson - www.marcusnilsson.com

20. BBQ Fill a soft sesame roll with pulled pork, shredded cheddar and charred red onion. Press and cook until golden.

21. Sausage-Feta Cut a pocketless pita round in half and brush both halves with olive tapenade. Sandwich with sliced, cooked spicy sausage, roasted red peppers and crumbled feta. Press and cook until golden.

22. Spicy Steak Lightly spread mayonnaise on the inside of a split onion roll. Fill with thinly sliced cooked steak and season with salt top with shredded pepper jack cheese. Press and cook until golden.

23. Apple-Brie Spread Dijon mustard on the inside of a split piece of baguette. Fill with sliced Brie and thinly sliced green apple. Press and cook until golden.

24. Reuben Spread Thousand Island dressing on 2 slices rye bread. Layer sliced Swiss cheese, corned beef, sauerkraut and more cheese between the bread. Press and cook until golden.

25. Tofu Reuben Thinly slice baked tofu and sear in a skillet with olive oil until golden. Make Reuben Panini (No. 24) using tofu instead of corned beef.

26. Italian Melt Drizzle the inside top half of a split sub roll with olive oil and red wine vinegar. Layer sliced provolone, salami, ham, turkey, pepperoncini and more provolone on the roll. Press and cook until golden.

27. Fajita Melt Brush the inside of a split sub roll with olive oil. Fill with sliced grilled chicken, sauteed peppers and onions, and shredded pepper jack cheese. Press and cook until golden.

28. Mexican Melt Make Fajita Melt (No. 27) with sliced roast beef instead of chicken. Press and cook until golden.

29. Steak-Gruyère Mix equal parts mayonnaise and horseradish. Stir in some chopped parsley. Spread on the inside of a split piece of baguette. Fill with thinly sliced cooked steak and sliced Gruyère. Press and cook until golden.

30. Jerk Swordfish Sprinkle 4 ounces swordfish with jerk seasoning grill. Spread mango chutney and mayonnaise on the inside of a split soft egg roll. Fill with the fish, sliced jalapenos and shredded pepper jack cheese. Press and cook until golden.


Watch the video: Who votes for The Worlds 50 Best Restaurants? (October 2021).