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Occupy Wall Street Protesters Try Fishing for Police with Doughnuts

Occupy Wall Street Protesters Try Fishing for Police with Doughnuts

Watch a video of OWS shenanigans in New York City

Sure, it's been a whole winter since the height of Occupy Wall Street, but apparently the movement is still alive and well and out on the streets.

This video featured on Gothamist surfaced last night, with the description, "After being evicted from the Union Square Plaza early yesterday morning, the Occupy Wall Street protesters decided to have a little fun with the men in blue."

The "little fun" entailed putting a doughnut on the end of a string, "fishing" with the doughnuts, and mocking the policemen overlooking the protest.

These were followed by chants like, "This is a peaceful doughnut," and, "Treat us like animals we'll treat you like pigs." Not sure if that's exactly the message OWS started out with, and of course none of the policemen try to take the doughnut.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.


OWS Protesters March on their Stomachs. What’s to eat? Check it out.

The logistics of feeding an advancing force can make or break even the best trained army, and no one knew that better than Napoleon Bonaparte as he uttered his famous quote on the Russian tundra in 1812: “An army marches on its stomach,” he said, as he watched his troops succumb to the emptiness of their bellies and the resulting weakness of their limbs.

Almost two hundred years later, another battle is being fought, this time on the streets of cities throughout the United States and around the world. Tens of thousands are gathering in parks and public squares in an “occupation” to demonstrate against what they perceive as economic inequality, corporate greed and Wall Street’s influence and power over government and elected representatives. And like Napoleon’s 19 th century brigades, they have to be fed.

Occupy Tucson started October 15, 2011 as a partner in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. It was one of approximately 600 cities that joined in the movement that day. Like the others, Occupy Tucson was at first a handful of protesters with home-made signs and knapsacks filled with bottled water. On our first trip down there, my wife and I didn’t even bother to bring along a snack. By the time we went back a week later, it had grown to a small, diverse community of pitched tents and makeshift services including a half tent with a couple of tables that served as the community “kitchen.” I walked over to a fellow who looked like he was in charge and handed him a couple of cases of bottled water and asked, “What can I do to help?” He told me lunch was scheduled to be served soon, and asked if I was good with a can opener.

I learned later that while I was opening a can of sweet corn and doling it out to docile protesters, others in Oakland were being bombarded with cans of tear gas and an Iraq War hero was bleeding in an ambulance on his way to hospital with a fractured skull. The next day I found myself passing out tuna salad sandwiches to a small assembly of about 100 protesters. They sat and ate in a sun-drenched 85 degree park in downtown Tucson while their compatriots huddled together in freezing rain in New York’s snow-covered Liberty Park trying to warm their icy fingers with a cup of lukewarm, stale coffee. Fruit salad was served during the arrests of dozens in Austin, Texas and Portland, Oregon.

We were marching on our stomachs, while others were being knocked down on their knees by stiffened police batons. Still, they had to be fed.

Tucson’s community of occupiers have more than tripled in size since its beginning only three short weeks ago. The kitchen is now a collection of canopies covering long tables of community donated food, mostly non-perishable canned goods, fresh fruits and vegetables and breads of every description. The crew, headed by OT’s Facilitator for Community Outreach, Mike Robbins, and volunteers Mike Presley and Eric Williams, keeps the area clean and neat and well within the guides outlined in the Tucson City Permit.

According to Robbins, “Last Sunday we were inspected by city officials and aced it. They gave us a triple A rating.“ The group has an official Tucson City license to prepare and cook donated food on the premises, and can serve outside food if prepared in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Tucson community members often contract with local restaurants to deliver prepared, hot meals to the park including copious amounts of pizza. For whatever reason, many donors choose to remain anonymous, but one of the nearby restaurants, Cafe54 (cq) openly supports the protesters and often prepares a take-out feast. The well-stocked kitchen now serves as many as 125 meals three times a day as well as mid-morning and afternoon snacks. It is a virtual beehive of culinary activity.

There are rumors that the opponents of the Occupy movement will try to stop the protests by attacking the food chain. Only a few days ago in the middle of an October blizzard, New York City officials confiscated OWS’s generators, making it impossible to prepare hot meals for the protesters gathered there. Two hundred years ago, Napoleon’s army was moved back because of something as basic as eating. Let’s hope that this time we keep those stomachs full.