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9 Surprising Drinking Rituals Around the World (Slideshow)

9 Surprising Drinking Rituals Around the World (Slideshow)

When it comes to drinking and getting belligerent, some countries have surprising customs

When grabbing “schooners” (beers) with mates, Aussies take turns buying a round, which they call “shouting.” If you don’t step up and shout a round when it’s your turn, you may labeled a “tight ass” or a bludger,” neither which are nicknames you want to be called.

Australia — Shouting a Round of Beers

When grabbing “schooners” (beers) with mates, Aussies take turns buying a round, which they call “shouting.” If you don’t step up and shout a round when it’s your turn, you may labeled a “tight ass” or a bludger,” neither which are nicknames you want to be called.

Croatia — Rajika for Medication and Digestion

Croatians drink Rajika, which is like moonshine, for more than social reasons. They also drink it to cure illnesses and as a digestive after a meal.

Denmark, Sweden — Shooting Aquavit and Singing Songs

Depending on which Scandinavian country, Denmark or Sweden, that you’re in, aquavit, a traditional Scandinavia drink, goes down differently.

Denmark: Before shooting a shot of aquavit, Danish drinkers raise their glass and say “skal,” making sure to meet everyone’s eyes. Before setting the glass back on the table, everyone meets eyes once again. The shot is followed by a glass of beer and more shots, with the toast repeated every time.

Sweden: Swedes will sing a drinking song before, during, and after each round of shots of aquavit, which are followed by a glass of beer. As the shots keep coming, the singing gets louder and more enthusiastic.

Japan, Korea — Drinking and Pouring with Both Hands

When picking up, pouring, and drinking an alcoholic drin in Japan and Korea, they use both hands because it’s bad manners to use just one. It’s also impolite to pour your own glass. It’s respectful to always accept the first drink offered to you and to turn away when taking a sip.

Netherlands — Genever “Head Butt”

The Dutch style of drinking genever, a kind of flavored whiskey, is to do it by “head butting.” To do this, they pour chilled genever in a tulip glass until the drink reaches the very tip of the rim. Bending from the waist, they take a sip, then straighten up and follow with a sip of beer. The “head butt” is repeated until the drink is gone.

Peru — Passing the Glass

In Peru, one beer is shared among a group. One friend pours a glass from a bottle, and the bottle is passed to the next friend, who waits for them to drink the glass and then flick the froth onto the ground. The next drinker does the same, and the beer is passed until it’s finished and it’s time for another.

Romania — Palinka In the Morning

According to folk wisdom, palinka, a type of fruity brandy, gives strength, so Romanians take a shot first thing in the morning.

Russia — Empty Glasses Under the Table

Russians have a habit of giving long, story-like toasts with a punch line. When they’ve finished a drink, empty glasses go under the table, not on top.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.


10 Birth Rituals Around The World

Birth is one thing that all human beings share in common, although our birth experiences are all unique. Birth practices, traditions and rituals are all greatly influenced by the society and culture in which we live. There are many birth rituals around the world that are intriguing!

Things that may be completely ‘normal’ in Mexico (for example) may seem strange to those living in Australia. The differences in birth practices in developed countries can, surprisingly, also be startlingly big. For example, around half of all women in Brazil give birth via c-section. In some private hospitals, the rate of c-sections can be as high as 80 percent. In the Netherlands, this number is much closer to 10 percent, which is the rate recommended by the World Health Organization.

It’s not just hospital practices that affect birth across the world – culture and tradition play a significant role. In the US, where pain medication is accepted as a normal part of birth, over half of all women have epidurals during labour. This contrasts with Japan where many women labour without pain relief. There is a traditional Japanese belief that labour pains help to prepare women for motherhood, and that labour pains should be endured.