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Thyme-Roasted Apples and Onions

Thyme-Roasted Apples and Onions

Ingredients

  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt plus additional for sprinkling
  • 6 7- to 8-ounce onions, halved through root end, each half cut into 6 wedges
  • 6 teaspoons coarsely chopped fresh thyme, divided
  • 6 Braeburn apples (about 2 3/4 pounds total), peeled, halved, cored, each half cut into 4 wedges

Recipe Preparation

  • Boil cider in large saucepan until reduced to 2/3 cup, about 28 minutes. Whisk in butter. Season glaze with 1 teaspoon coarse salt. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 week ahead. Cover; chill. Rewarm; whisk before using.

  • Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 425°F. Butter 2 large rimmed baking sheets. Toss onions in large bowl with 2 teaspoons thyme and 3 tablespoons glaze. Arrange in single layer on 1 sheet. Toss apples in same bowl with 2 teaspoons thyme and 3 tablespoons glaze. Arrange in single layer on second sheet. Sprinkle onions and apples with coarse salt and pepper.

  • Roast onions on upper oven rack 10 minutes. Place apples on bottom rack. Roast onions and apples 20 minutes. Remove both sheets from oven. Drizzle remaining glaze evenly over onions and apples. Reverse position of sheets. Roast 20 minutes longer.

  • Increase oven temperature to 475°F. Roast onions and apples until tender and slightly caramelized, watching closely to prevent burning, about 10 minutes longer. Transfer onions and apples to large bowl. Season with coarse salt and pepper. Sprinkle with remaining 2 teaspoons thyme.

Recipe by Amelia Saltsman,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains the following: Calories (kcal) 185.6 %Calories from Fat 27.4 Fat (g) 5.6 Saturated Fat (g) 3.5 Cholesterol (mg) 15.0 Carbohydrates (g) 35.3 Dietary Fiber (g) 3.9 Total Sugars (g) 28.3t Net Carbs (g) 31.4t Protein (g) 1.1Reviews Section

All ingredients in this recipe:
undefined, Thyme, Granny Smith Apple, undefined (Apple Juice [organic pasteurized juice from fresh pressed organic, seasonal apples], Stone-Ground Mustard [water, organic mustard seeds, organic vinegar, salt, organic spices], Agave [organic agave syrup], Apple Cider Vinegar [apple cider vinegar], Vegetable Broth [water, organic carrots, organic onions, organic celery, organic tomatoes, organic tomato paste, organic garlic, organic leeks, organic cane sugar, sea salt, organic bay leaves, organic parsley, organic thyme, organic molasses, organic carrot powder, organic onion powder, organic spices, organic expeller pressed canola and/or safflower and/or sunflower oil, organic flavoring, organic spices, organic potato flour, organic expeller pressed canola and/or safflower and/or sunflower oil]), undefined, undefined, Red Beets, Carrots, Broccoli, undefined (Tahini Sauce [sesame seeds], Lemon Juice [lemon], Olive Oil [olive oil], Granulated Garlic, Sea Salt, Water), undefined, undefined (Italian Seasoning [basil, rosemary, marjoram, oregano, thyme], Onion Powder, Ground Rosemary)

Allergen information:
Contains No Allergens

Allergens may be reflected in pantry items listed in the “What You’ll Need” section of the recipe card.

Generic USDA information is used in the nutritional analysis, ingredient list, and allergen declaration of pantry items. Pantry items are found in the "What You'll Need" section of the recipe card.

Manufactured on equipment that processes products containing egg, fish/shellfish, milk, sesame, soy, peanuts, and tree nuts.


Thyme Roasted Onions and Apples

Fresh thyme adds a savory note to sweet roasted apples and caramelized onions.

4 cups apple cider
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt plus additional for sprinkling
6 7- to 8-ounce onions, halved through root end, each half cut into 6 wedges
6 teaspoons coarsely chopped fresh thyme, divided
6 Braeburn apples (about 2 3/4 pounds total), peeled, halved, cored, each half cut into 4 wedges

Heat the cider in a large saucepan and simmer until reduced to 2/3 cup, about 30 minutes or so. Whisk in butter. Season glaze with 1 teaspoon coarse salt. (This part can be made 1 week ahead. Cover chill. Rewarm whisk before using.)

Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven preheat to 425° F. Butter 2 large rimmed baking sheets. Toss onions in large bowl with 2 teaspoons thyme and 3 tablespoons glaze. Arrange in single layer on 1 sheet. Toss apples in same bowl with 2 teaspoons thyme and 3 tablespoons glaze. Arrange in single layer on second sheet. Sprinkle onions and apples with coarse salt and pepper.

Roast onions on upper oven rack 10 minutes. Place apples on bottom rack. Roast onions and apples 20 minutes. Remove both sheets from oven. Drizzle remaining glaze evenly over onions and apples. Reverse position of sheets. Roast 20 minutes longer.

Increase oven temperature to 475° F. Roast onions and apples until tender and slightly caramelized, watching closely to prevent burning, about 10 minutes longer. Transfer onions and apples to large bowl. Season with coarse salt and pepper. Sprinkle with remaining 2 teaspoons thyme.


Anti-Cancer Food Spotlight: Apples

Apples are the quintessential American food, brought by colonists from Europe early in the country’s history. Apples were a key player in the American tale of Johnny Appleseed, who preceded pioneers as they traveled west, planting trees. And then of course there’s the apple pie, synonymous with patriotism and wholesomeness and summed up in the phrase, “As American as apple pie.” While one might not think there’s anything special about the apple, based on it’s relative inexpensiveness and year-round omnipresence at the local supermarket, this humble fruit is a great example of a anti-cancer food and fits well in our nutrition guidelines for breast cancer risk reduction. Like it’s sister fall fruit the pumpkin, it really does keep the doctor away with it’s cancer-fighting properties.

How Apples Help Fight Breast Cancer

  • Fiber – As with all fruits and vegetables, apples are a good source of fiber. One study shows that those who ate the most dietary fiber had a 11% lower risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer compared to those who ate the least.
  • Phytochemicals – In a recent study focusing on apples and cancer, it was found that the phytochemicals in apples substantially reduced the occurrence of malignant Cancerous. tumors A mass of cells that can be benign or malignant. in rats relative to the amount of apple extract consumed. In addition, the phytochemicals also inhibited an important inflammation pathway (NFkB) in human breast cancer cells.
  • Pectin – Apples are a source of pectin, which increases the feeling of fullness. Part of a complete diet, apples can reduce your calorie intake, helping reduce the risk of obesity, a major risk factor in breast cancer.
  • Low-calorie – Apples are a source of low-calorie nutrition, which also helps reduce the risk of obesity.

Eat Your Peels (But Wash Them First)

Studies have shown the majority of nutrition as well as 75% of the apple’s fiber is in it’s peel, not it’s juicy sweet inside, so don’t skip the peels! Apples are, however, #1 on the Environmental Working Group’s Dirty Dozen list, a list of 12 fruits and vegetables with the most pesticides. According to the National Cancer Institute Cancer Trends Progress Report, some pesticides have been classified as carcinogens (cancer-causing chemicals) and people in higher contact with pesticides have a higher rate of cancer. Buy organic apples if you can. If cost is an issue, the EWG recommends going organic for just the Dirty Dozen items this will eliminate a large amount of pesticides from your diet. At the minimum, thoroughly wash your apples before eating (not before storing) so the anti-cancer benefit isn’t cancelled out.

Beware the Juice

Not only does apple juice not contain the fiber so lauded by health advocates, but a study just released says some samples do have concerningly high levels of arsenic, a carcinogen A cancer producing substance. . As with all things nutrition related, when in doubt, eat fresh and unprocessed.

Cancer-Fighting Apple Recipes

These recipes pair apples with an array of other cancer-fighting ingredients.


Heat oven to 425 degrees F. Trim each tenderloin of any silver skin (this can be tough when cooked). To do this, use a small sharp knife and slide the blade under and outward to remove it.

Pat pork dry with paper towels and then rub with one tablespoon of the oil and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a heavy-bottomed oven-safe skillet over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmers, add the pork tenderloins and cook, occasionally turning, until evenly browned all over about 12 minutes. Transfer to a large plate or cutting board. (The pork will not be cooked through).

    Prepare Apples and Onions

Keep the pan used to sear the pork on the stove over medium heat. Check the pan, if it looks dry, add two to three teaspoons of additional oil. (If there is fat left in the pan from cooking the pork, there is no need to add extra oil).

Add the apples and onions then cook, occasionally stirring, until lightly browned around edges, about 5 minutes. Stir in 1 teaspoon of thyme.

Use a pastry brush (or use your fingers) to rub the seared pork all over with the mustard, 2 teaspoons of thyme, and the black pepper. Place the seared pork tenderloins on top of the apples and onions, and then slide into the oven.

Roast 10 to 15 minutes or until an internal thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers between 145 and 150 degrees F. Transfer the pork to a large plate and cover with aluminum foil. Let rest about 10 minutes.

While the pork rests, place the pan with apples and onions back onto the stove and turn heat to medium. Add chicken stock and use a wooden spoon to scrape the pan, lifting any brown bits from the bottom. Bring to a simmer and cook until reduced by half. Add butter and stir until melted.

To serve, slice pork into 1-inch slices then serve on a bed of the apples and onions with pan sauce drizzled on top.


Chocolate-Strawberry Cream Tart

Pressed Crust
¾ cup old-fashioned rolled oats
½- ¾ cup whole wheat pastry flour
¼ cup toasted sesame seeds
¼ teaspoon sea salt
1 Tablespoon brown rice syrup
¼ - 1/3 cup high heat canola oil   

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 9-inch pie plate. Combine all ingredients with a pastry blender or 2 forks in a large bowl until crumbly press evenly into prepared pie plate. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden. Cool to room temperature before filling.  

Chocolate Base
½-1/3 package non-dairy malt-sweetened chocolate chips
¼ cup extra firm silken tofu
3 – 4 Tablespoons pure agave
1 teaspoon pure vanilla  

Puree silken tofu in food processor. Melt chocolate chips in a double boiler and then add to tofu and blend thoroughly. Add agave and vanilla and continue to purée. Pour into baked/cooled piecrust and smooth evenly. Can be refrigerated overnight.  

Cashew Cream Filling

½ cup raw cashews
1/3 cup water
¾ package of extra firm or firm silken tofu
4-5 Tablespoons agave (or to taste)
1 teaspoon vanilla
pinch  sea salt  

Blend cashews and water until smooth. Add other ingredients to food processor and process until smooth and creamy. Refrigerate until ready for use.  

Strawberry Topping
Box of strawberries (preferably organic)
Agave
Wash and slice strawberries and moisten with agave. Refrigerate up to 30 minutes.  

To Assemble: Spread cashew cream over chocolate base and then in concentric circles arrange strawberry slices.


Lemon Thyme Roasted Salmon

It always makes me feel great, and it is so delicious.

[clickToTweet tweet="This six ingredient #salmon recipe is ready in less than 20 minutes and couldn't be much easier" quote="This six ingredient salmon recipe is ready in less than 20 minutes and couldn't be much easier"]

Most of the time I enjoy seafood, it isn't very fancy.

But occasionally, I'll splurge on a nice piece of fish like this salmon.

This recipe is so easy and quick. To make it a meal, toss some chopped potatoes and onions on another baking sheet with oil and roast in the oven for about 15-20 minutes before you start the salmon.


Braeburn apples, botanically classified as part of the Rosaceae family, were first discovered growing in the Braeburn Orchard in New Zealand in 1952. They are a chance seedling, which means they were not bred intentionally but were created by nature. The exact parentage of Braeburn apples is unknown, but they are believed to be a relative of the lady hamilton and granny smith apple, both varieties which were growing in the orchard where the Braeburn apple was first discovered. Braeburn apples are a modern variety that is known as an all-purpose apple and are valued for their strong flavor that rivals the classic apple cultivars.

Braeburn apples are a good source of fiber, vitamins A, and C, and contain trace amounts of boron and potassium, most of which are located in the apple's skin.


Thyme Roasted Carrots

Thyme Roasted Carrots

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pound medium carrots, sliced in half, and cut into sections
  • 1 Tablespoon minced fresh thyme or 1 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 Tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 Tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 Teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 400°. Place carrots evenly in a baking pan. In a small bowl, mix thyme, oil, honey and salt brush over carrots. Roast 15-20 minutes or until tender.

Order your Market Basket now! www.sweetbasilfarms.com.

Share the SWEET-ness. We are Sweet Basil Farm & Gardens on Facebook. Look for us on Pinterest, Youtube, Instagram, Google+ and Twitter. We are a local Middle Georgia producer of farm fresh fruits and vegetables and members of the American Poultry Association, licensed by the Georgia Dept. of Agriculture as Poultry Dealers and Brokers, and a proud member of the Georgia Grown program, a division of the Georgia Dept. of Agriculture. We sell and ship locally grown and produced wildflower Honey, Goat’s Milk Soaps, Gourmet Cooking Oils, We also breed, sell and ship poultry, pet pigs, bearded irises and much more. We have an 80 acre working farm, with great emphasis on all natural gardening and livestock management practices. An 1840’s general store is situated on our property, and serves as our on-site farmer’s market. We have a large vegetable and herb garden, fruit orchards and more. Conveniently located off of Interstate 75 near the Johnstonville Rd exit (#193). We are six miles west, located in Barnesville, Lamar County, Georgia.

This recipe, blog post and photos by Tisha Johnson Matthews, of Sweet Basil Farm & Gardens. Special thanks to J. David Matthews, of Barnesville, Georgia for support and patience with all that I try and test. To see the original recipe, or to find more delicious recipes, visit Taste of Home .


Whole Roasted Chicken and Vegetables Recipe

Don’t you just love an easy, fresh, hearty, one dish meal? I know I sure do, which is why this simple whole roasted chicken and vegetables get made at least once a month in this house, especially since it’s so easy to swap out different veggies to go with the season.

In this recipe I’m using potatoes, onions and carrots (this is proably my favorite combination).

I love these simple, fresh ingredients.

My grandmother made this dish a lot growing up. I’ve tried changing it up with different spices but I always go back to using just some plain ol’ salt, pepper and butter. It seasons everything up but still allows for the natural flavors to shine through.

I made this yesterday for Sunday dinner and it looked so pretty all plated up on the table. By the end of the night though that poor bird was all bones.

If I have time or if I’m making this for company, I usually brine the bird overnight using this simple brine right here. It makes the chicken crazy moist but if not then I just roast it slowly in the oven and it comes out juicy and tender. Just be careful not to overcook or you’ll have a dry bird on your hands

The chicken is done with it reacher 180 F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thigh without touching the bone. I usually just give the leg a wiggle and if it moves freely I know it’s done. Or I’ll stick a toothpick in the leg and if the juices come out clean I know she’s good and ready!

NOTE* The stuffing is just for aromatics and moisture. I always discard it after it’s done roasting.