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Norwegian Potato Lefse

Norwegian Potato Lefse

A traditional Norwegian flatbread that's mildly sweet, but super tasty.MORE+LESS-

3

cups cooked and mashed Yukon Gold potatoes, cooled

3

cups unbleached, all-purpose flour

2

tablespoons butter, cold and cut into 1/4-inch cubes

2

tablespoons half and half or heavy cream

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  • 1

    In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine flour, salt and sugar. Add in cooled mashed potatoes, butter and cream and combine thoroughly.

  • 2

    Heavily flour a countertop. Using about a golf ball-size piece of dough at a time, place ball on floured countertop, press to flatten with your hand and flour the top of the dough piece. Using a floured rolling pin, roll out piece of dough until very, very thin (about as thin as a tortilla).

  • 3

    Using a bench scraper or pizza cutter, cut rolled out dough into a rectangle shape, about 5 x 8 inches. Place rectangle on a plate and cover with a piece of parchment paper (lefse cannot touch each other or they'll stick together, so make sure you put a piece of parchment paper between each layer).

  • 4

    Repeat steps 2 and 3 with the rest of the remaining dough.

  • 5

    Head a large griddle or frying pan to medium high heat. Grill each side of the lefse until light brown spots form, about 1-2 minutes each side. Place on another plate, separating each piece with parchment paper (like above).

  • 6

    Serve warm with fillings of your choice.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • Lefse is like the tortilla of Northern Europe. Made with potatoes, flour and a dash of cream, it’s dense but thin, mildly sweet and an excellent conduit for a variety of spreads.In case you hadn’t guessed by my post on Pretzel Rolls, I’m German. Okay, false – I’m American, but of German descent (my grandparents came straight from the motherland, and still retain their brash accents and gastronomic customs). Everyone on both sides of my family is German, down to the spouses and even some pets (if a name defines a pet’s cultural roots).That is, everyone except my husband, who is Swedish.Going to college in Minnesota, land of 10,000 lakes and many a Swede, I’d grown rather accustomed to “uff-das,” Sven and Ole jokes and lutefisk. There was even a guy on campus whose car was painted like the Swedish flag, and the inside of the car was equally decked out, down to Swedish flag pillows on the seats. For real.So meeting and marrying a Swede from Minnesota wasn’t much of a surprise to me. What was a surprise was the food he loved to eat. Though he shared a common aversion to the infamous lutefisk, he held one Swedish food near and dear to his heart: lefse. And until I met him, I’d never had the pleasure of partaking in this Swedish (actually, Norwegian, but close enough) culinary treasure.Though traditionally eaten warm and rolled up with butter and sugar glazed on the inside, my husband and I have taken to eating lefse in a variety of ways. Our favorite? The lefsedilla – two pieces with melted cheese inside. It is Oh. So. Delicious.

3 large potatoes
1 tablespoon milk
2 tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons salt
2 cups flour (more if needed)

Lefse (LEF-suh) is a potato flatbread.

For Hardware you'll need: a large pot, a large frying pan or griddle of some sort (at least 9 inch bottom diameter), a mixer or a potato masher, a bowl and plastic wrap or tupperware, a flat surface big enough to knead on, a rolling pin, a spatula.

First, peel your potatoes. The fresher they are, the easier this is to do and the less nasty they will be. If your potato has things growing out of it and you absolutely can't get a new one, cut them out and don't eat them for the love of god. Cut out all remaining black spots and cut them in half or until they're about evenly sized. This is so they all cook at the same speed. Now put them into a big pot and fill it with water to cover them. Put some salt in, around a teaspoon or so. Now cover the pot, and go do something else for a while.

When they're done, take them out and drain the water. We'll be using milk and butter for these potatoes, not the potato water. You can tell when they're done when the middle isn't hard and raw-potatoey anymore. Go ahead and cut one in half if you can't tell by looking.

Now, if you're lazy like me, you'll use a stand mixer to mash the potatoes. If not, you can go at them with a potato masher or a fork, whatever. Get them nice and mashed, then measure out two cups of potato and set whatever you have left over aside. You can add garlic and eat it by itself or make lazy noodles or shepherd's pie or something. There is no such thing as too much mashed potatoes.

Add the tablespoon of milk, tablespoon of salt, and two tablespoons of butter to it and then mash them again until it's all blended. Then put it into some sort of container - I used that mixing bowl with plastic wrap over it (make sure the plastic wrap is down inside the bowl touching the potatoes if you do this) but a Tupperware would be fine too. Stick it in the fridge until it's cold. Usually about two hours works, although when I'm lazy I leave it in there for a day or so. That should have taken about two hours.

Now pull the potatoes out and make sure that they're cold. Not room temperature, but cold, and slightly stiff. Get your flour out and flour up your flat surface. This is to keep the lefse dough from sticking to the counter, which it will probably do anyway a few times. Put the chunk of mashed potatoes down into the middle of the floured area and spread about half a cup of flour over the top of it.

Now knead it for about ten minutes, gradually incorporating another half cup of flour besides the amount of flour you'll have to add to replace the stuff it picks up from your counter. After it has a whole cup of flour in it, it will feel much doughier and nothing like mashed potatoes anymore.

Now you need to divide it into eight pieces and ball it up. But whatever floats your boat, so long as you get eight equally sized little balls of dough out of it. Spread more flour out onto your surface - no, more. Lefse loves getting stuck when you roll it out, it's infuriating. The best way to avoid it is to flip the dough over every time you take a roll on the rolling pin, flick a little more flour under it, and then roll the other side. Always keep your rolling pin well floured, too.

You want really thin pieces here, absolutely no thicker than your average flour tortilla, otherwise they won't cook all the way through and will taste a little doughy. They should work out to be about nine inches diameter.

Once you have all pieces rolled out, heat up your frying pan or griddle or whatever and grease it slightly if it isn't non-stick. Non-stick is great for this purpose, though.

Flip one of the uncooked lefse into the pan and quickly unfold any creases that might have happened with the spatula. You only turn lefse once, and you do it when you see air bubbles forming under the lefse. It won't need to cook for as long on the other side, but it will do the bubble trick again (harder to see this time, careful not to leave it on too long and burn it!) or you can just pick it up with the spatula and check underneath.

When it's done, put it on a plate and repeat. When you've done all lefse, you will have the a plate of goodness. You can now do just about anything with it. Use it as bread in sandwiches, wrap it around meatballs, eat it plain, or my favorite, dessert lefse - smeared with butter and sprinkled with cinnamon sugar.


Lefse Recipe Summary

I have been eating Lefse for as long as I can remember, but it just hasn’t been in my family’s tradition to cook the stuff. I decided I was going to bring this tradition back and make some homemade lefse. In my experimentation, I quickly learned that the fresh stuff does not disappoint. It takes on a softer, fresher, more lively flavor that is totally worth it.

Not to mention, I am super happy that I might be able to help your family make something beautiful and start a tradition that can be rewarding and fun. Lefse is great and if you can make it together as a family or enjoy the food together as a family, it becomes that much more special.

We previously made a traditional Klubb recipe and this is another great Norwegian recipe that tastes absolutely amazing.


Norwegian Potato Lefse

Ingredients

500 g mashed potatoes (about 2 1/2 cups ) (see mashed potatoes recipe)
110-140 g flour (about 1 cup )
Salt to taste (depends on how salty the mashed potatoes are. Adjust as you need to)

Instructions

Add flour to the mashed potatoes. Knead to combine. Should be a manageable dough. Salt to taste. Chill in fridge.

Divide into golf ball size pieces and keep in fridge until ready to roll out.
Using additional flour, roll each piece into a round flat bread. On a griddle or in a frying pan, cook on high heat for a few seconds on each side. Stack and wrap in a towel to keep warm. They are delicious served with a little margarine, especially when they are warm. Norwegians wrap them around hot dogs for a savory option, or fill them with sugar, margarine, and cinnamon for a sweet option. The possibilities are endless.

Did you make this recipe?


Norwegian Potato Lefse

Lefse is a traditional Norwegian flat bread that includes cooked, mashed potatoes as well as flour to make a filling and tasty base for all kinds of toppings. Jess Murphy from Kai Galway cooks her potato with dilisk to add flavour and a nutrition boost.

Ingredients

  • 1 large starchy or all-purpose potato
  • 1 handful of seaweed
  • 25g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 30ml heavy cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon of salt, plus more to taste
  • 100g plain flour
  • For serving: butter, cinnamon-sugar, jam, peanut butter, cream cheese, cold cuts, cheese slices, gravlax, or any other topping your inner Norwegian desires

Step 1 - Prep

Peel the potato and cut into large, uniformly-shaped chunks. Place in a small saucepan with the seaweed and cover with cold water. Over medium-high heat, bring the water and the potato to a gentle boil. Cook until the potatoes are very soft and easily pierced with a fork, 10-12 minutes from the start of the boil. Drain the potatoes, remove the seaweed and discard, and transfer to a mixing bowl.
Using a potato masher, potato ricer, or a fork, mash the potatoes as thoroughly as possible you don’t want any lumps. Cut the butter into small chunks and mix it with the potatoes. Add the cream and salt. Keep mixing until the butter and cream are completely absorbed. Taste and add more salt if desired. Transfer the potatoes to a storage container and refrigerate overnight or up to three days.

Step 2 - Cook

When ready to make the lefse, clear a large workspace for dividing and rolling out the flatbreads. Lefse are traditionally made with grooved wooden rolling pins, but a standard rolling pin will do the job just fine. A pastry scraper or sturdy spatula for lifting and transferring the rolled-out flatbreads is also handy. Mix the mashed potatoes with 1/2 cup of the flour. At first this will be very crumbly and floury, but the mixture will gradually start coming together. Turn the dough out on the counter and knead once or twice to bring it together into a smooth ball and divide it into 2 equal portions. Roll each portion of dough between your palms to form a small ball. Cover the ball with a clean dishtowel and put to one side of your workspace. Set a heavy pan over medium-high heat. When a bead of water sizzles when flicked on the pan, it’s ready.
Dust your workspace and rolling pin lightly with flour. Roll one of the rounds of dough in the flour and then press it into a thick disk with the heel of your hand. Working from the centre out, roll the dough into as thin a circle as you can manage. Lift, move, and flip the dough frequently as you work to make sure it’s not sticking. Use more flour as needed. Roll the lefse gently onto the rolling pin, as if you were transferring pie dough, and lay it in the skillet. Cook for 1-2 minutes on each side until speckled with golden-brown spots. Transfer the cooked lefse to a plate and cover with another clean dish towel. While one lefse is cooking, roll out the next one. Keep all the cooked lefse under the towel to keep them warm and prevent them from drying out. If the lefse start to stick to the pan, melt a small pat of butter in the pan and wipe it away with a paper towel to leave only a very thin coating of fat on the pan.

Step 3 - Serve

Top the lefse with your topping of choice. Leftover lefse can stacked with wax paper between the layers to prevent sticking and kept refrigerated for up to a week or frozen for three months. They can be eaten cold from the fridge or warmed for a few seconds in the microwave.

Ingredients

  • 1 large starchy or all-purpose potato
  • 1 handful of seaweed
  • 25g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 30ml heavy cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon of salt, plus more to taste
  • 100g plain flour
  • For serving: butter, cinnamon-sugar, jam, peanut butter, cream cheese, cold cuts, cheese slices, gravlax, or any other topping your inner Norwegian desires

Step 1 - Prep

Peel the potato and cut into large, uniformly-shaped chunks. Place in a small saucepan with the seaweed and cover with cold water. Over medium-high heat, bring the water and the potato to a gentle boil. Cook until the potatoes are very soft and easily pierced with a fork, 10-12 minutes from the start of the boil. Drain the potatoes, remove the seaweed and discard, and transfer to a mixing bowl.
Using a potato masher, potato ricer, or a fork, mash the potatoes as thoroughly as possible you don’t want any lumps. Cut the butter into small chunks and mix it with the potatoes. Add the cream and salt. Keep mixing until the butter and cream are completely absorbed. Taste and add more salt if desired. Transfer the potatoes to a storage container and refrigerate overnight or up to three days.

Step 2 - Cook

When ready to make the lefse, clear a large workspace for dividing and rolling out the flatbreads. Lefse are traditionally made with grooved wooden rolling pins, but a standard rolling pin will do the job just fine. A pastry scraper or sturdy spatula for lifting and transferring the rolled-out flatbreads is also handy. Mix the mashed potatoes with 1/2 cup of the flour. At first this will be very crumbly and floury, but the mixture will gradually start coming together. Turn the dough out on the counter and knead once or twice to bring it together into a smooth ball and divide it into 2 equal portions. Roll each portion of dough between your palms to form a small ball. Cover the ball with a clean dishtowel and put to one side of your workspace. Set a heavy pan over medium-high heat. When a bead of water sizzles when flicked on the pan, it’s ready.
Dust your workspace and rolling pin lightly with flour. Roll one of the rounds of dough in the flour and then press it into a thick disk with the heel of your hand. Working from the centre out, roll the dough into as thin a circle as you can manage. Lift, move, and flip the dough frequently as you work to make sure it’s not sticking. Use more flour as needed. Roll the lefse gently onto the rolling pin, as if you were transferring pie dough, and lay it in the skillet. Cook for 1-2 minutes on each side until speckled with golden-brown spots. Transfer the cooked lefse to a plate and cover with another clean dish towel. While one lefse is cooking, roll out the next one. Keep all the cooked lefse under the towel to keep them warm and prevent them from drying out. If the lefse start to stick to the pan, melt a small pat of butter in the pan and wipe it away with a paper towel to leave only a very thin coating of fat on the pan.

Step 3 - Serve

Top the lefse with your topping of choice. Leftover lefse can stacked with wax paper between the layers to prevent sticking and kept refrigerated for up to a week or frozen for three months. They can be eaten cold from the fridge or warmed for a few seconds in the microwave.


You came to the right place to find taste-pleasing Norwegian Recipes in English.

On these pages, I will give you free recipes for delicious traditional foods of Norway as well as new recipes from everywhere.

This country is known for its Salmon and Codfish and other seafood products, but the Norwegians enjoy a great variety of foods, not just fish.

Here you will find recipes for roasts, stews, soups, casseroles, and salads using beef, pork, lamb, venison, chicken, and fish.

In addition, you will find recipes for tradional Norwegian dessers, such as bløtkake, Christmas cookies and cakes berry puddings, sweet berry soups, compote and traditional Norwegian foods such as lefse and småbrød.

While visiting norway-hei.com, you will also find out about the foods unique to the various villages and towns around Norway. Many village or district have their own unique methods and recipes for some of the traditional foods of Norway. Some of the recipes have the name of the Municipality or town attached to it, such as Fræna ball, which means potato dumplings from Fræna, or Kristiansunds Bacalao.

This country offers many nuances in food preparation and the foods do not lack delicious flavors. No wonder, people from all over the world come to live in Norway and of course, they bring their special native cuisines along with them. It didn't take long before Tacos became a Norwegian food. he he

Furthermore, when the "Norskes" travel and they do a lot of that, they discover delicacies from foreign lands and bring great recipes back to their homeland.

So even though, Norwegians hold tight to their traditional foods, they enjoy trying new things. Norway is a country of variety. The recipes here will reflect that.

My mom, makes great Mexican foods. Tacos are one of her her specialties.

The other day I gave her a compliment about the fact she makes such good Mexican food, she said, "Oh, I don't make Mexican food, I only make Tacos".

She also makes a delicious pizza. Find the recipe below. OK, done bragging about my mom for now, but it is hard to stop.

My wonderful mom on her back porch. (left) Would you believe she is standing outside in the middle of winter in a short sleeve top - that's a real Viking for you.

I will keep on adding delicious recipes. I am on it. Ann :-)


Bacalao (left)

Bacalao, a Norwegian Cod Recipe
Cod Casserole
Cod Baked in Foil
Cod and Broccoli Medley with Bechamel Sauce
Cod in Cream Sauce
Fish Patties/Fish Burgers
Fish Nuggets Norwegian Fiskeboller
Au Gratin Cod, an easy make-ahead meal
Cod Tacos, a Norwegian recipe with a South of the Border twist.

Gravlaks
Healthy Poached Salmon with Dill Sauce
Baked Salmon
Salmon in Lemony Lemon Sauce
Marinated Salmon
Salmon Chowder
Marinated Salmon with Sherry Sauce
Smoked Salmon Quiche
Salmon Salad Recipe
Smoked Salmon Sandwich (above) Shrimp:
Cucumber Aspic/Mold with Shrimp


Potato Lefse: My Mormor's Norwegian Griddlecake Recipe

One of our favorite holiday dishes to eat was Mormor’s least favorite dish to make—but she made it for us anyway!

My Mormor loved to cook, and she loved to make just about everything—with one exception. She was not into making the Norwegian specialty, lefse, which is best described as a potato flatbread or crepe. Lefse is eaten either plain, with butter, sugar, and cinnamon, or smeared with sweet mustard and filled with pieces of pork belly. It was always a staple on our Christmas day breakfast buffet.

My dad’s all-time favorite was and is still pork-belly-and-mustard-stuffed lefse, and he would start begging Mormor in November to make them for him. She would say, “No, make it yourself.”

I still don’t know why she didn’t like making them. They are quite easy, so what was the problem? All I know is, every year she would fill the kitchen with swearing and cigarette smoke between sips of sherry while making them. We just left her alone!

But once they were done, the kitchen was filled with sunshine again. I loved tasting the lefse fresh off the griddle, warm with just a little sugar on top. And my dad would always look at her lovingly while eating his beloved lefse with pork belly.

MAKES ABOUT 20

You will need:
2.5 pounds russet potatoes
1/2 cup butter
1⁄3 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
21/2 cups all-purpose flour

  1. Peel the potatoes, and then boil until tender.
  2. Run the hot potatoes through a ricer into a large bowl.
  3. Mix in butter, cream, salt, and sugar. Cool mixture in the refrigerator.
  4. Add flour and work it in well. (Return the dough to the refrigerator if you are not making the lefse right away.)
  5. Roll the dough into walnut-sized balls with your hands. Then, with a rolling pin, roll balls into thin disks between two clean towels, dusted with a little flour.
  6. Cook on a 400°F-griddle until golden brown on each side.
  7. Store wrapped in a damp towel until ready to eat. Serve with a smear of butter and a sprinkle of sugar and cinnamon.

TIP:

These taste best when they are freshly made. You will need a ricer and a griddle. There are special lefse griddles available, but a pancake griddle works fine—it just has to be really hot.


Added by

I made this recipe recently.I made it for 24 servings instead of 6. The dough turned out quite dry and crumbly. I went ahead and added an extra 1/4 cup milk and it worked perfectly. Would highly recommend this recipe!

This lefse is great. Very easy to roll out and tastes great. I did substitute part cream for half of the milk. Many friends have asked for the recipe.

I have made lefse before, but this is the first time I used a recipe that called for instant potatoes. I had no luck at all with this recipe, as the dough seemed too flimsy to be able to roll very thin. And when baked it turned out quite hard and dry. I sought out a family friend who makes lefse with instant potatoes, and had much better luck with her recipe.

lefse is the best swedish food i have ever had! my grandma always made it and now she passed it on to my mom and my mom passed it on to me and i hope to pass it on to my children! i HIGHLY recommend this its just one thing you must do before you die


*Pour la version française voir ci-dessous*.
English:
Ingredients:
450g / 1lb of potatoes.
1/4 cup unsalted butter.
1/4 cup heavy cream.
1/2 tsp salt.
1 cup flour.
The mashed potatoes must remain in the fridge for 24 hours before use..
Français:
Ingrédients:
450g de pommes de terre.
55g de beurre doux.
60ml de crème entière.
1/2 cuillère à café de sel.
120g de farine.
La purée doit rester au réfrigérateur pendant 24 heures avant utilisation.

Video taken from the channel: Quarantine Kitchen


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26 thoughts on &ldquoLefse: A Guide to the Norwegian Classic&rdquo

Many thanks for the background information. I never knew lefse could be a preserved food.

My father’s grandparents were Norwegian immigrants, and our Christmastime potato lefse was always served with brown sugar and butter.

We just harvested some purple potatoes, which should make our lefse very pretty!

I’m looking forward to your recipes to look for a close match to my grandmother’s family recipe. She was a Thordesen from Minnesota. Her parents immigrated from Oslo. I loved her lefse.

I like the Hardanger (I may have not spelled it correctly). My grandparents were from Giske and Spjelkavik. It’s made with flour, buttermilk (and other things). We cook it on a griddle, and it gets hard. When ready to serve we soften between two damp cloths. When soft put a lot of real butter on it, sprinkle cinnamon and sugar on it and enjoy.

In our family the thick potato lefse was eaten only on Christmas eve with lutefisk, smoked cod, boiled potatoes and roasted pork ribs. When I was a kid in the 70s I would butter the lefse put on potatoes and lutefisk and roll it up. I called it a Norwegian fish taco! Family from Hoddevik a small fishing along Nordfjord. I visited there in July 83 for a month.
The thin floor lefse was more of an “everyday” lefse for us put whatever there was in it. Both kinds my mom cooked in a big cast iron skillet
I don’t think you can classify lefse regionally. It’s all about family history, traditions, preferences etc.

My family came from Straumgjerde, near Alesund. We also use the potato lefse and would mix the Lutefisk with mashed down boiled potatoes and melted butter and pile it on the Lefse. Rolled up it would look like a giant burrito ! Every time we go to a Sons of Norway Lutefisk dinner everyone would stare at us making our rolled up burrito. Obviously I don’t think there’s any one way to eat Lutefisk and each region did there own thing.

Same with my family! Lutefisk rolled up in a
Lefse with melted butter.
My family was from Vang in Oppland.


Watch the video: Lefse Recipe. How To Make Potato Lefse From Scratch (January 2022).