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Restaurant Locks in Non-Tipping Customers and More News

Restaurant Locks in Non-Tipping Customers and More News

In today's Weekly Media Mix, a cow wanders through a McDonald's drive-thru, plus perfect food truck parking

Arthur Bovino

Media Mix

The Daily Meal brings you the biggest news from the food world.

Industry
• Here is a very long article about how McDonald's became the biggest thing in the social universe, ever. Burger King, take note. [NY Times]

Restaurants
• Michelin-starred French chef Jean-Yves Schillinger will reportedly take over the kitchen of Nikki Beach in New York. [Fork in the Road]

Chefs & Personalities
• Chef Todd English calls Eva Longoria "a sweetheart," as he talks about Beso, his restaurant with the actress. [The Insider]

Weird News
• A cow wandered through the drive-thru of a Colorado McDonald's, where employees joked she was "not making any orders. Maybe visiting relatives, but not making orders." [9News]

Shame of the Week
• A family claims that a restaurant locked them inside because they refused to pay the 17 percent service fee tacked onto the bill for parties of six or more. "If you're not satisfied with the service, you shouldn't have to pay gratuity," the patron said. [KPRC]

• Guy Fieri's stolen Lamborghini was finally found — and a teenager was charged with the theft. [The Daily Meal]

Food Trucks
• There are some perfect spots for food trucks to park around the city, and New York City might start auctioning them off to the highest food truck bidder. [NPR]


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


How Coronavirus Is Impacting the Food Industry

The impact of COVID spans farmworkers, delivery drivers, bartenders, and just about everyone in the business of food.

By now, you’ve already heard. SXSW: canceled. Coachella might be canceled. And in the food world, more of the same. Expo West and the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) conference are both huge industry events, totaling over 86,000 attendees, that announced cancelations due to Coronavirus concerns in the past several days, impacting food companies, distributors, chefs, editors, writers, and more.

To put the concern in context, most of these measures are preemptive. Austin, for example, where SXSW is held, doesn’t have any confirmed COVID-19 cases as of this writing. The hope is to keep it that way by stopping hundreds of thousands of people from descending onto the city.

Still, customers are reacting in major ways, sometimes due to xenophobic fears. In New York’s Chinatown, business has dropped 40 to 80 percent, we reported last week. 98 perfect of the neighborhood’s businesses are mom-and-pop, and some have taken to paying their staff from their own wages due to razor-thin margins.

Just as officials are just beginning to understand coronavirus’s public health impact, people in food�rmers, restaurateurs, and servers𠅊re waiting out its financial toll. Some industry responses have been positive. A few days after our plea for restaurants to provide paid sick leave for their staff, Darden Restaurants (of Olive Garden and Red Lobster) announced they would offer it to their hourly workers, in a move that we hope spreads industry-wide.

The situation is still unfolding, and it’s likely that the full impact will take months, even years, to be seen. But here’s what we’re seeing so far.


Watch the video: Trinkgeld für den Kellner? Nein danke, du hast Mindestlohn! (October 2021).