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Basic Kale Chips

Basic Kale Chips

There couldn’t be a simpler, tastier snack than Kale chips. There really is no downside to this snack!

Click here to see The Best Kale Recipes You've Ever Tried.

Notes

The less oil you can get away with, the better. In my experience, even slightly over-oiling the kale makes the chips soggy. If you can get a small drizzle evenly across all of the leaves, that would be ideal.

Kale chips are also great in that they are super versatile. Sometimes I had red chile flakes, and sometimes I sub salt for some grated Parmesan. Feel free to experiment with your favorite spices.

Ingredients

  • 1 curly kale
  • 1 1/2 olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

How to Make the Best Veggie Chips Beyond Kale

Chips are a classic accompaniment to sandwiches, whether you’re tossing a mini bag into a lunch box or bringing a family size sack along on a camping trip. But potato chips are pretty, well, basic. If you haven’t had a kale chip epiphany yet, it’s tough to describe the curious mix of gluttonous joy and health-food smugness one feels as one power-eats a sheet pan of hot, crackly greens—or any other crispy veggie chips.

It goes something like: “Sweet Lord, I can’t stop eating these” and “I’ll never jaw my way through a kale salad again!” and “I’m getting vitamins and fiber–WOOO!”

All because you realized that slicing veggies super-thin, slicking ’em with oil, seasoning, and roasting makes an unbelievably delicious vegetable 2.0, with all of the satisfying appeal of crunchy potato chips, minus the grease and gluten.

You can use a food dehydrator for the purpose:

Cosori Food Dehydrator, $59.99 from Amazon

Make jerky, veggie chips, and dehydrated fruit at home.

Think of these recipes as your gateway to crisp-ifying almost any vegetable or fruit. Once you get the hang of it (and, really, it’s as easy as it gets), you’ll never look at turnips or rutabagas or apples the same way again. Also, while we just touted the fact that you don’t need any special gadgets for this, if your knife skills aren’t so sharp, a mandoline will really help:

Mueller Austria V-Pro Multi Blade Adjustable Mandoline Slicer, $34.97 from Amazon

Thin, precise slices are easy with this tool (just watch your fingers).

Basic Kale Chips

I know that as a nutritionist I’m expected to LOVE kale… and I do enjoy it in some applications (like my roasted veggie + kale salad), but it’s certainly not my favorite leafy green. I do, however, love kale chips because I’m a snacker, and rather than mow down a box of Cheez-Its, these are my go-to because I know all I really want is something crispy and salty to mindlessly munch on—and you can never have too many veggies!

There are a bunch of ways to flavor them, but I wanted to share the basic recipe so you could experiment from there. You can go with just salt and pepper, but I like to add lemon juice for a little more tang and some gut-healthy nutritional yeast to add some Vitamin B12 and, more importantly, CHEESY flavor.

Speaking of cheese, did you know kale has more than 2x the calcium as dairy? It also has anti-cancer properties, helping to reduce oxidative stress (thanks to its antioxidants) and break down and destroy cancer-causing agents with a phytonutrient it contains known as sulforaphane.

You may be saying, “All sounds good, but kale makes me bloat.” I feel you. This is often due to a sugar that cruciferous vegetables contain called raffinose, which produces extra gas as it breaks down and can make you feel bloated. This comes with the territory, unfortunately, but the stronger your gut health, the less bloating you will feel, so it may just take some time getting used to having this type of vegetable in your diet if you’re not used to it already.

One more thing before I lose you—for those dealing with thyroid issues, roasting up some kale chips is a good way to get in crucifers. While crucifers are super healthy, detoxifying foods, those with thyroid issues are often instructed to avoid them. Cooking kale, brussels sprouts, broccoli, and other similar veggies, however, reduces the goitrogenic substances that you want to avoid.


The best kale for chips? Tuscan kale.

After testing with both, we’ve found the best kale for kale chips is Tuscan kale. What is it? Tuscan kale is an Italian variety of kale with dark green leaves and a mild, almost sweet flavor. It’s also labeled as Lacinato kale, dinosaur kale, black kale, or cavolo nero (black cabbage in Italian). It’s called dinosaur kale because the scaly, ridged leaves almost resemble dinosaur skin! You should be able to find Tuscan kale at your local grocery store.

If all you can find is curly kale, you can use that too! Curly kale is fluffier than Tuscan, and it has a more bitter flavor. That bitter flavor mellows out in the oven, but the fluffier texture can make it more brittle. Tuscan kale has flatter leaves, making it more suited to chips.


How To Make Kale Chips

  • alcohol-free
  • egg-free
  • paleo
  • peanut-free
  • pork-free
  • pescatarian
  • gluten-free
  • tree-nut-free
  • red-meat-free
  • dairy-free
  • fish-free
  • vegetarian
  • shellfish-free
  • vegan
  • sugar-conscious
  • soy-free
  • wheat-free
  • Calories 61
  • Fat 2.3 g (3.5%)
  • Saturated 0.3 g (1.4%)
  • Carbs 8.8 g (2.9%)
  • Fiber 3.6 g (14.5%)
  • Sugars 2.3 g
  • Protein 4.3 g (8.6%)
  • Sodium 236.9 mg (9.9%)

Ingredients

Equipment

Large sharp knife (optional)

Instructions

Preheat oven and prep kale. Preheat your oven to 300°F. Remove the center stem by slicing along either side of the stem with your knife, cutting them in half while removing the stem. Alternatively, you can strip the leaves from the stalk using your hands.

Tear the kale into pieces. Tear your kale into rough, 3-inch pieces. The kale will shrink when it bakes, so don't tear it too small. Alternative: If you have a bunch of kale that has small leaves, you can leave them whole for a dramatic presentation. I have found that the lower third of the tough stalk will still need to be carefully cut away, but you can leave the rest of the leaf intact.

Wash the kale. Wash your kale in a tub full of water, allowing any dirt and sand to sink to the bottom and scooping the washed kale off the top.

Dry the kale. Now we come to one of the most important parts of baking kale chips. You must thoroughly dry your kale or the chips will steam rather than crisp in the oven. If you have a salad spinner, use it. Or drain the kale in a colander. Either way, the kale will still be a little damp so spread out on a clean kitchen towel, cover with another towel and pat dry.

Place kale on baking sheets. This is the second most important step. The kale should be placed in one layer on the sheets. Do not let the kale pieces overlap too much or the kale will steam and not crisp up.

Oil and salt the kale. Drizzle on a little oil. How much oil you use will depend on how much kale you have and how big your baking sheets are. Start with a little bit and add more if needed. This is also a good time to use an oil mister, if you have one. Using you hands, gently toss the kale and lightly rub the oil into each piece. If you need a little more oil, add it now. Redistribute the kale back to a single layer. Sprinkle on salt and any additional flavorings.

Bake the chips until crisp. Place trays in the oven. Bake for 5 minutes, then rotate trays as the thin pieces of kale will quickly brown in your oven's hot spots. Check again after 3 minutes. You will hear the kale sizzling from the oil. Carefully pick up or nudge a chip. You want them to be crisp but not browned.

Cool the chips. Remove from the oven and let cool on the tray (unless you feel they are about to turn brown, in which case you should transfer them immediately to a rack or paper towels to cool.) Do not pile them up while they are still hot or they will steam and wilt.

Enjoy! I find that kale chips are best eaten within a few hours of baking but they will do OK for a day or so if well sealed in a plastic bag or airtight container.


Reviews

I found out the secret to making these right. First, I had wilted lacinato kale in the fridge that I made stiff by cutting the stems and letting them sit in water overnight, like flowers. Then, I washed them and made sure they were very dry. (Turned on the oven at 350.) I de-stemmed the kale and cut them into the size of the bigger U.S. stamps, close to 1"x2". I seasoned them with olive oil, Eden Foods Gomasio, and Trader Joe's Garlic Salt. I arranged them on parchment paper so that none of them overlapped, not even folded over. I put them in the over and checked after 10 minutes. You have to keep checking them to find the special place between just right (holds together when you bite into them) and overdone (disintegrates when your tongue hits the roof of your mouth). I found that the ones that overlapped or folded over were a mixed bag. Nonetheless, the ones that were separated well were delicious and a hit with the spouse. Also, it's Whole30 compliant, which is a plus!

These are really good and super easy. I make them all the time.

Schmeh. Like salty desiccated garnish.

These are okay, not great, and a serious mess. Still, I tried to give the recipe two forks, but the system is allowing me only one. Epicurious is harsher than I am.

Recently bought (pricey) kale chips from the store and loved them, so I thought Iɽ try my own. These turned out great! I put them in at 350 and let them bake for 7 minutes. I don't have the best oven, so they weren't baked evenly, but they were still great! Over baked kale is no good, so keep an eye on them and make sure they don't look like they're getting too dark--look for that bright green, just turning a little darker color and they will be delicious! I love sea salt so that's all mine needed. Definitely not buying kale chips again!

I make these almost every day but roast them at a higher temp 350-400 for 6-9 min. I add sea salt, pepper, thyme & rosemary, and they are incredibly flavorful. I wouldn't serve them at a cocktail party, however, because they make a mess if you don't eat them over a plate!

Can't give this a thumbs up although I can see the merits. Simple to make I used the curly kale and suggest you stand it up on the tray when baking to encourage crispy texture. Not a fav for me though I might make it for a party to satisfy my guests if only because it is so simple to do. Also, agree, the dog loves this stuff!

Iɽ like to see the blood work of all these kale fanatics. Enough already with the kale!

Fantastic! Served these along with other hors d'oeuvres - a big hit. So simple and so delicious and healthy. Will make these often.

Not as expected per raving reviews. Followed recipe except used small locally grown kale. Slightly bitter result would notbe kid friendly. What did I do wrong?

fantastic recipe. i've seen other recipes that call for a higher temperature but i think it makes the chips taste burnt. i've added my own twist to this by shaving some parmesan on top to give it an extra nuttiness.

After several years, we still make these all the time. They're a great, healthy snack, and are always a hit as cocktail party appetizers, a book group munchy. Adults and kids love them. You can spice them up with smoked paprika - a favorite and a bit of salt, or keep them simple for a wine tasting so you don't interfere with the wine. Easy and dee-lish!

Well after all the raving reviews I decided to try this. A LOT of work for minimal results. These are very very messy to eat because they basically break apart all over the floor when touched or eaten. At the suggestion of someone else, I added some Balsamic to it. By adding a little Salt as well they turned out way too salty. The cooking time is much faster - I bumped the heat to 350 and they took like 5 mins to ɽry' out to the right texture. Lastly, they are just not at all filling - you need to eat like the whole batch to get any satisfaction since they're so thin.

Short on time so oven was at 375 and roasted for 15 mins. Was tossed with olive oil S&P and some dried garlic. Used baby kale from Costco double layer roasted for only 15 mins. Even the non-veggie lovers gobbled it up! Maybe it was because it was baby kale the double layer was fine and every piece was crunchy.

These are seriously the most wonderful things ever. All I use is pepper, olive oil, and smoked salt and they turn out delicate, crispy, and delicious. I would make these every day if I had the time.

I tried doing these two ways: Exactly as described, and with balsamic vinegar. Hands down, the clear winner had the vinegar! I recommend trying a tray of each and running with the winner. My husband liked them as much as potato chips, and that is saying a lot!

I made some of these using a salt free spice blend from Costco since some family members have to be careful about sodium. I think they turned out a little bitter because some of the dry herbs/spices burned. They're still edible but I won't use that blend again. The plain salt and pepper ones are fabulous! As for storage, I made these 24 hours ago. Once they cooled, I broke some in half and put them into an old tall mayo jar. The others went into ziplocks. A day later,the jar chips are just as crunchy as last night but the plastic bag chips lost a lot of crunch.

I had once tried "broccoli chips" (made from the leaves), and hadn't liked them. I heard a lot about kale chips so I thought Iɽ give them a try. I had just enought (curly) kale, which I ripped into smaller pieces. The leaves were probably quite broad because I couldn't fit them into one layer. The ones that were on top didn't crisp as well, but I thought they were ok anyway. Not all of them got oil on them, and I think the best ones had some oil and salt, so I think I'll add more next time. The pepper was nice too. I'm going to try this recipe on the broccoli leaves I have on hand. My mother, brother and husband each tried one and expressed interest combined with dislike. I however, ate quite a few (maybe half) right after cooking them and am taking the rest to school as a snack. I think these probably taste better when you know how healthy they are. )

We discovered Kale Chips at a new eatery in our town. We love it with almost anything. We have even sprinkled Balsamic vinegar on it before cooking and it came out wonderful.

Really good, easy to make. I baked a few minutes extra to insure the kale was nice and crispy. I've tried sprinkling a bit of sesame oil for a nutty flavor. My kids love it.


45 Different Ways to Eat Kale When You Can't Get Enough Leafy Greens

Whether you like your kale cooked or raw, fresh or frozen, try these recipes that taste good and are good for you.

If you haven't gotten onboard with the kale craze, it's about time you did &mdash this cruciferous leafy green is one of the most versatile staples in a kitchen, and it may be one of the healthiest. You can massage it into a bountiful seasonal salad that everyone will enjoy, or ladle out a luxe bowl of soup or stew with plenty of satin-like kale ribbons it even turns up our favorite baked pasta dishes up a notch. Kale can be swapped for some of our starchiest carbohydrates, and it can be blended into delicious dressings and sauces. What's not to love?!

Of course, the real allure of kale for some is the fact that it's majorly packed with nutrients but totally free of all those extra calories. Since kale is imbued with naturally occurring phytonutrients when it's harvested, it acts as a bit of a superfood when regularly eaten. Antioxidants and other nutrients in kale can help reduce your risk of chronic disease like diabetes it's loaded with carotenoids to help keep your eyes sharp and its potassium and magnesium counts counteracts extra sodium in your diet. Plus, it's a great source of calcium, making it a must have for those who are avoiding dairy altogether.

If you're looking for more than just salads, we have you covered, as we're presenting some of our favorite ways to load up on kale in our kitchens. Pick up a few bunches at your local grocer (or fresh from the yard!) and try incorporating them into sides, soups, pizzas, pastas, and even desserts! These recipes celebrate the queens of greens in all her forms.


Oven baked kale chip ingredients

  • Kale: You can use any variety of kale for kale chips, such as curly, dinosaur, or red kale.
  • Oil: You don’t need much oil, just enough to lightly coat the leaves, bringing out that magical crispiness. To use less oil, simply spray the leaves with cooking spray rather than using the full amount of oil.
  • Salt: As with any good chip, these kale chips require a healthy pinch of salt.
  • Optional flavorings: To bring even more magic to your kale chips, flavor them with a quick homemade blend of spices using any of these seasonings (Ranch and Dorito are my favorites!)

Trying These Cheesy Kale Chips

I find it a little funny that I&rsquom writing a post about homemade kale chips. Kale chips aren&rsquot a new thing by any means. I&rsquove successfully ignored and resisted them for a couple of years.

If I saw a post talking about how amazing they were or how baked kale chips are a great, healthy alternative when you&rsquore craving chips I couldn&rsquot help but roll my eyes. I thought, you&rsquove gotta be kidding me.

They&rsquore a vegetable! How could I possibly enjoy kale as a substitute for actual chips of the unhealthy, but totally tasty, variety?! There&rsquos no way that a homemade kale chip could satiate my monthly cravings for salty, nacho cheese chips.

Well, I&rsquom hear to tell you that I couldn&rsquot have been more wrong. My friend made some kale chips recently and I relented.

Begrudgingly, I told her I would try them, all the while having very little confidence that they would do anything to satisfy my monthly cravings for something salty and crunchy.

It turns out I wanted to lick the baking sheet clean. And I told her I would have, it I had been home alone with no one to witness that.

Not only would I eat these &ldquocheesy&rdquo kale chips if someone else made them, but I would make them on purpose for myself. What really made these Kale Chips was the nutritional yeast she had sprinkled on them &mdash it gave them a great cheesy flavor without actually having any cheese in the recipe.

A few months ago I hadn&rsquot even heard of nutritional yeast. Now that I&rsquove tasted it, and read about the nutrients that it contains, I want to put it on everything.

Click HERE to save this recipe for Cheesy Kale Chips!


Kale Chips Recipes

Basic Kale Chip Recipe:

The basic recipe for kale chips that you see in most recipe books and videos is a simple combination of kale, salt, and olive oil.

  1. Remove kale leaves from their stems.
  2. Coat with extra virgin olive oil (I prefer coconut oil).
  3. Top with salt.
  4. Bake on a baking tray for 10-15 minutes at 350 degrees.

Derek’s Kale Chips:

In the video below, I will show you how I personally make kale chips.

You’ll notice I prefer not to drizzle in olive oil as I don’t like cooking with olive oil. You may however drizzle with some coconut oil, melted butter, or melted ghee. Simply put kale in a bowl, drizzle the oil, and then mix around with hands or utensils.

  1. Separate kale from stems or use pre-packaged kale leaves.
  2. Add curry powder, garlic powder, unrefined salt, and cayenne pepper to taste.
  3. Bake for 40-50 minutes at 200 degrees or 10-15 minutes at 350 degrees.

Brenda Leigh Turner’s Kale Chips Recipe

Brenda Leigh Turner of leansecrets.com shares her recipe for kale chips which I’ve found to be one of the absolute best on YouTube. Be sure to check out her Lean Secrets Youtube Channel which has tons of great recipes, healthy eating tips, and workout advice. Although it’s primarily aimed at women, her recipes are really great for anyone.


Watch the video: GRUNDLEGENDE LEKTIONEN IM VERSTÄNDNIS VON GESPROCHENEM ENGLISCH (December 2021).