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McDonald’s Free Internet No Longer Available for Porn

McDonald’s Free Internet No Longer Available for Porn

McDonald’s installed filters to keep customers from watching porn in restaurants

Wikimedia/Anemone Projector

McDonald's says it is installing Wi-Fi filters that will keep people from watching free porn in its restaurants.

Most people have zero desire to watch porn at McDonald’s, and probably nobody wants to watch anybody else watch porn at McDonald’s, but until very recently that was completely possible via McDonald’s free public Wi-Fi. Now McDonald’s says it is installing filters to put a stop to the practice.

According to Gizmodo, an “Internet safety group” has been petitioning McDonald’s for two years to install filters on its Wi-Fi to prevent people from viewing porn in the restaurants, lest some unwitting, innocent child accidentally catch sight of something untoward.

"McDonald's is committed to providing a safe environment for our customers," a McDonald’s spokesperson said. "We had not heard from our customers that this was an issue, but we saw an opportunity that is consistent with our goal of providing an enjoyable experience for families."

McDonald’s new porn-free Wi-Fi is reportedly already in place in most corporate-owned stores, and will eventually be in place at all corporate-owned locations in the U.S.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


Brexit, Toblerones and Bowie: Google's Year in Search in 2016

G oogle is the main portal to the internet for most people in the UK. Whether we're opening Safari, Chrome or Edge, the first step for the majority of us is to type a search term into Google. By extension of this, what we're searching can prove very telling.

The search giant's annual trends round-up is therefore particularly insightful in what has been decried as one of the worst years in history. The topics, explanations and tips we searched for in 2016 offer a window into how we coped as a nation and species as the stable fabric was wrenched from beneath us.

"What is the EU?" is the second top UK question on the EU since the #EURefResults were officially announced pic.twitter.com/1q4VAX3qcm

&mdash GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) June 24, 2016

W hile we heard about some controversial searches as they happened - such as people Googling "What is the EU?" and "How to emigrate" in the hours after the election - Google's annual round-up of trending searches shows those that made the news are just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the most commonly searched questions of the year was "What is Pokemon Go". It was so popular that trends monitors were shocked to notice the question briefly outstripped searches for porn (a regular holder of the top spot).

B ut not everyone in the UK was obsessed with the wildly popular game. While the majority of the UK was googling "What is Pokemon Go", the top term in Manchester and Cardiff was "What is Brexit" and in Sheffield it was "What is Article 50". Meanwhile in Belfast, the most commonly searched for definition was "What is the internet".

S imilar regional discrepancies were true of "how to" searches, with the majority wanting to know "How to play Pokemon Go" while the people of Sheffield wanted to know "How to pluck your eyebrows" and those in Cardiff and Leeds "How to work out percentages". In Bradford, it was "How to age lace".

The most searched for questions about the EU Referendum were "What is Brexit", "When is the EU Referendum" and "Who can vote in the EU Referendum". Pragmatic as the questions about the vote to leave the EU were, Google is still struggling to answer the tenth most popular one: "What happens after Brexit?"

T he most searched for questions also included "What is the single market", "What is a coup" and "Where is Brussels". People were also keen to know where Love Island is filmed and "How to get an Irish passport".

Google's annual trends also reveal the food, styles and gadgets we're into. The top searched for recipes included blueberry wine, Greek salad and Jaffa cake, as well as "How to make" batter for fish, Yorkshire puddings and mashed potato. The tenth most searched for recipe of the year was "dog birthday cake".

In style and tech, people in the UK were looking for longer hair, smokey eyes and nail art, as well as the new iPhone, Samsung Galaxy S7 and the Google Pixel.

I n a year that saw Donald Trump elected president, Britain vote to leave the EU and the Olympics, it was Euro 2016 that came out on top as the most searched for news event. Pokemon Go and David Bowie's death followed, with Brexit and the US election dominating the news box. The most searched for famous people of the year were actress Meghan Markle and mixed martial artist Conor McGregor.

I n a bid to distract ourselves, we were also fascinated by the weird and wonderful - with rampaging clowns, the death of gorilla Harambe and shock over Toblerone shrinking making it into the top 10 news events of the year.


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