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Whole Papayas Linked to Nationwide Salmonella Outbreak

Whole Papayas Linked to Nationwide Salmonella Outbreak

23 people have been hospitalized in eight states.

The CDC is advising consumers in six Eastern states to avoid buying fresh papayas from Mexico due to potential salmonella contamination that's already sickened dozens and sent 23 people to the hospital. The states where the affected papaya was sold include Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

Since January, 62 people have been infected across eight states including Texas and Florida. 76 percent of the infected people report eating papayas grown in Mexico, according to the CDC’s report.

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If you live in one of these states and have papaya from Mexico (including in fresh fruit salads or other mixes), you should throw them away immediately, even if no one has gotten sick. The CDC is also recommending that you sanitize the area where the papaya was stored, as salmonella bacteria is transferable. (Here’s a step-by-step guide.)

If you’re unsure where your papaya was grown, check with the store where you purchased it, or throw it out. If you’ve recently eaten papaya from Mexico and/or are experiencing any symptoms of Salmonella—including diarrhea, fever, or stomach cramps—report it to your doctor and the health department. Those with compromised immune systems, such as children, pregnant women, and the elderly, are at higher risk of developing a more severe illness.

This investigation is ongoing, and we will keep you updated with more information as it becomes available.


Whole Papayas Linked to Nationwide Salmonella Outbreak - Recipes

The FDA recommends consumers avoid all Caribeña brand Maradol papayas

The Food and Drug Administration on July 26 announced a nationwide recall of Caribeña brand Maradol papayas after the fruits were linked to a salmonella outbreak that has killed one consumer and sickened 46 others.

As of the morning of July 25, the outbreak had infiltrated 12 states, and authorities believe the illness can be traced to salmonella-bearing Maradol papayas grown in Mexico. Twelve of the victims of the outbreak experienced symptoms severe enough to require emergency hospitalization.

Grande Produce LLC, the Texas-based produce distributor linked to the outbreak, claims to have ceased sourcing papaya from the contaminated farms. The specific farm and region responsible for the disease infiltration has yet to be identified, so it is advised to steer clear of all papayas from the Grande Produce brand.

The FDA posted the company’s recall announcement, which insists that the papayas currently being shipped are all clear, and that the facilities were clean of salmonella when tested. The Centers for Disease Control, however, made the recommendation in a July 25 statement “that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico until we learn more.”

Grande Produce has not disclosed where the infected papayas had been shipped — although they did confirm that some were sent to Maryland, the residence of at least five of the salmonella victims.

Since the distribution details of the fruit are yet to be uncovered, the FDA recommends consumers avoid all Caribeña brand Maradol papayas. Walmart and Aldi immediately issued recalls on all Maradol papaya brands in their stores.

Salmonella is nothing to take your chances with: Consumers are advised to dispose of any Maradol papayas purchased. A full refund for Caribeña brand papaya can be obtained by returning the fruit to the place of purchase or calling Grande Produce at 888-507-2720.

Just throwing out the papaya isn’t enough. You should also wash all countertops and utensils the fruit came in contact with — thoroughly .


Whole papayas linked to multi-state Salmonella outbreak

Walmart posted the following recall on its website. Also sold at Target.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and state and local partners, are investigating a multistate outbreak of 62 Salmonella Uganda illnesses potentially linked to whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico. These illnesses have been reported in eight states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Florida, and Texas.

The FDA is increasing import screening for whole, fresh papayas and will continue to investigate the cause and source of the outbreak as well as the distribution of products. Preliminary analysis of product import records indicates that the whole, fresh papayas that made people sick in this outbreak were from Mexico. As this outbreak investigation continues, the FDA will work with our Mexican food safety regulatory counterparts to better define this outbreak. Additionally, the FDA will update this advisory as more information becomes available.

Recommendations

For Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers in Specific States:

CDC is advising that consumers in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island not eat any whole, fresh papayas from Mexico, and should throw them away. Retailers, restaurants, and other food service providers in those states should not serve or sell whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico, until more is known about this outbreak. Of the 62 illnesses, 60 have been reported in six states in the Northeast. One patient from Florida who was reported ill had traveled to Connecticut before becoming ill. Another patient from Texas was also reported ill, and at this time additional information about this patient is being collected. More information will be provided as it becomes available.

© 2019 US Food Safety Corporation. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.


Salmonella outbreak in U.S. linked to ‘whole, fresh' papayas imported from Mexico

LOS ANGELES - A salmonella outbreak in the U.S. has been linked to whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico, the CDC and FDA said in an announcement.

The public health and regulatory officials warned the public not to eat, serve or sell the papayas or food that contains papaya from Mexico in the following six states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island.

Sixty-two people have fallen ill in eight states: Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Texas, the CDC said. Twenty-three people have been hospitalized.

Most of the sick people in this outbreak are adults over 60 years old, the CDC said.

The illnesses began on dates ranging from Jan. 14, 2019 to June 8, 2019.

No deaths have been reported so far.

The CDC recommends that people throw the papayas from Mexico away, even if some of them have been eaten or if no one has gotten sick yet. The center also advises people wash and sanitize places where papayas were stored: countertops and refrigerator drawers or shelves.

Around 80 percent of U.S. papayas come from Mexican production, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The FDA "strongly advises" importers, suppliers and distributors, as well as restaurants, retailers and other food service providers from all states to hold whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico.

Salmonella are a group of bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal illness and fever called salmonellosis, according to the FDA.

Around 12-72 hours after eating food contaminated with salmonella, most infected people develop diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps, the CDC said. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.

But in some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized, as salmonella could spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.

"More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal," the FDA said.

Those more likely to have a severe salmonella illness include: children younger than 5 years old, pregnant women, adults 65 years and older, according to the CDC.

Two years ago, there was another salmonella outbreak linked to papayas from Mexico.

On March 17, 2017, the FDA investigated an outbreak and the CDC reported 20 cases in 3 states with 5 hospitalizations and 1 death.


Papayas cited in 23-state Salmonella outbreak

Jul 25, 2011 (CIDRAP News) – Papayas imported from Mexico are the likely source of a Salmonella outbreak involving 97 cases in 23 states, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today.

The outbreak investigation has prompted Agromod Produce, Inc., a distributor in McAllen, Tex., to recall all its fresh, whole papayas, which were distributed nationwide and in Canada through retail stores and wholesalers, according to the FDA and a company recall notice.

The FDA said it found the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agona in two papaya samples—one collected at Agromod Produce in McAllen and one collected at a US border station and bound for Agromod.

"Epidemiologic, laboratory and traceback information identifies papayas from Mexico imported through Agromod Produce, Inc. as a likely source of infection," the FDA said in a press release.

Agromod is recalling all papayas sold before Jul 23 under the names Blondie, Yaya, Mananita, and Tastylicious, the company recall notice said. The FDA advised consumers and retailers who have the papayas to throw them away in sealed containers so people and animals can't eat them.

The 97 Salmonella cases include 10 hospitalizations but no deaths, the FDA reported. The cases were reported between Jan 1 and Jul 18. Patients have ranged in age from less than 1 year to 91 years, with 41% of them under age 5. Sixty-three percent are female.

The FDA said it is taking action to keep contaminated papayas out of the United States, including increasing the sampling of imported papayas. Besides the two samples that tested positive for the outbreak strain, 10 other samples from Mexico have tested positive for other strains of Salmonella. None of the sampled lots entered the country, the agency said.

States reporting the most cases in the outbreak are Texas with 25 and Illinois with 17 no other state has reported more than 8 cases.

Quick searches of the FDA and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web sites suggest that foodborne disease outbreaks linked to fresh papayas have been rare or unknown in the United States, with none identified in recent years.

However, a Salmonella Litchfield outbreak in Australia in 2006-07 was linked to papayas, according to a May 2009 report in the Journal of Food Protection. The outbreak strain was found in some papaya samples collected at stores in Western Australia.


NEWS SCAN: Papaya Salmonella cases up, anthrax case update, food re-inspection fee opposed, China reports polio cases

Papaya-linked Salmonella outbreak grows to 106
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today issued its final update on a Salmonella Agona outbreak linked to imported papayas from Mexico, which sickened 106 people in 25 states between Jan 1 and Aug 25. The final numbers reflect an increase of seven more patients in two more states since the CDC's last update on the outbreak on Jul 26. Earlier this year investigation linked the outbreak to eating fresh, whole papayas imported from Mexico by Agromod Produce, Inc, based in McAllen, Tex. On Jul 23 the company recalled the products that were distributed nationwide and to Canada through retail and wholesale outlets. On Aug 25 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned papaya imports from Mexico after finding Salmonella on 15% of Mexican papaya samples. The positive samples were from 28 different firms and included nearly all of Mexico's major papaya-growing regions.
Aug 29 CDC final outbreak update
Aug 25 CIDRAP News Scan

Anthrax patient in Minnesota had prior lung condition, is recovering
The patient who has been treated in a Minnesota hospital for inhalational anthrax is a man in his 60s who had a prior chronic lung condition that may have made him more susceptible to Bacillis anthracis infection, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) revealed in a recent update. The man was sick when he arrived in Minnesota in early August after traveling through several other states, including Montana, Wyoming, and the Dakotas, where B anthracis is found in the soil and infections have occurred in animals. "He is recovering and he will be discharged in the near future," Minnesota State Epidemiologist Ruth Lynfield told CIDRAP News today. She said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has characterized the B anthracis strain and noted that it has previously been found in the United States and Canada. The patient had "multiple exposures to soil and animal products" during his trip, the MDH said in its Aug 26 update. Lynfield said investigators have not been able to determine specifically where the exposure occurred. The illness is the first human anthrax case in Minnesota in several decades.
Aug 26 MDH update

Proposed FDA food-import re-inspection fee stirs opposition
There are signs of opposition to a food safety re-inspection fee that the FDA is authorized to charge under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act, according to a report today in Food Safety News. The report says FDAImports.com LLC, a consulting firm for food and drug importers, is building a coalition of food importers and foreign food manufacturers to oppose the proposed reinspection fee, which aims to help cover the FDA's food inspection costs under the new law. The proposal would allow the FDA to collect a fee from importers if they have to re-examine a food shipment because of safety concerns. Some importers are concerned that the rule will be interpreted too loosely and have a major effect on the industry, and FDAImports is working to get businesses to voice their concern by submitting comments to the FDA. David Acheson, a former FDA official who is now a consultant with Leavitt partners, said it is unlikely that the fee would affect a "huge number" of food imports, according to the story.
Aug 29 Food Safety News story

China reports four imported polio cases
Chinese health authorities recently said they have detected four polio infections in the country's northwestern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region that were imported from Pakistan, according to Xinhua, China's state news agency. The infections, which struck children ages 4 months to 2 years in the region's Hotan prefecture, were reported in early to mid July. Two of the patients have been released from the hospital and have recovered, and two are still hospitalized in stable condition, according to the report. China's Center for Disease Control and Prevention said the virus's Pakistan source was confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO). Though China borders three of the four countries where polio is endemic, before the recent outbreak it has been polio-free for 11 years, Xinhua reported. Pakistan has reported a rise in polio cases this year, and in July the WHO said wild polio virus type 3 (WPV3) had been isolated from a child in a remote federal tribal area, the first in Asia for 2011.
Aug 26 Xinhua story
Jul 7 WHO statement


Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas (Final Update)

This outbreak appears to be over. This outbreak was one of four separate multistate outbreaks identified in 2017 linked to imported Maradol papayas from four different farms in Mexico. For information on the other outbreaks, please visit the Reports of Salmonella Outbreak Investigations from 2017 webpage.

  • Read the Recall and Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers>>
  • This outbreak appears to be over.
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration External investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Tenabo, Campeche, Mexico were the likely source of this outbreak.
  • This outbreak included five types of Salmonella: Thompson, Kiambu, Agona, Gaminara, and Senftenberg. The same strains of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.
  • A total of 220 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (144), Salmonella Kiambu (54), Salmonella Agona (12), Salmonella Gaminara (7), or Salmonella Senftenberg (3) were reported from 23 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to October 4, 2017.
    • Sixty-eight ill people were hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    Introduction

    CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) External investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections linked to imported Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico.

    Public health investigators used the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may have been part of this outbreak. A total of 220 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (144), Salmonella Kiambu (54), Salmonella Agona (12), Salmonella Gaminara (7), or Salmonella Senftenberg (3) were reported from 23 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) showed that isolates from people infected with Salmonella were closely related genetically. This close genetic relationship means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to October 4, 2017. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 40. Among ill people, 62% were female. Among 169 people with available information, 113 (67%) were of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 170 people with available information, 68 (40%) were hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    WGS did not identify antimicrobial resistance genes among isolates from 139 ill people one ill person&rsquos isolate, a Salmonella Senftenberg, contained a gene known to decrease susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing methods were used by CDC&rsquos National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory on clinical isolates from 10 ill people in this outbreak and no resistance was detected.

    Investigation of the Outbreak

    Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico were the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

    In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 145 people interviewed, 79 (54%) reported eating papayas. This proportion was significantly higher than results from a survey Cdc-pdf [PDF &ndash 29 pages] of healthy Hispanic people in which 22% reported eating papayas in the summer months in the week before they were interviewed.

    The Maryland Department of Health External collected papayas from a grocery store where several ill people reported eating papayas. One sample yielded Salmonella Kiambu and another sample yielded Salmonella Thompson. Both samples were from Caribeña brand Maradol papayas imported from Mexico. WGS showed that the Salmonella Kiambu papaya isolate was closely related genetically to the Salmonella Kiambu isolates from ill people. WGS also showed that the Salmonella Thompson papaya isolate was closely related genetically to Salmonella Thompson isolates from ill people. On July 26, Grande Produce recalled External Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017.

    FDA External tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Through this testing, FDA also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Campeche, Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak. Investigators compared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and WGS results of Salmonella isolates from the papayas to isolates from ill people in the CDC PulseNet database. These results showed the Salmonella isolates from papayas shared the same DNA fingerprint as the Salmonella isolates from ill people. This result provided more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from eating contaminated Maradol papayas.

    On August 5, Agroson&rsquos LLC recalled External certain Cavi brand Maradol papayas grown and packed by Carica de Campeche. On August 7, Freshtex Produce, LLC recalled External Valery brand Maradol papayas grown and packed by Carica de Campeche.

    This outbreak appears to be over. This outbreak was one of four separate multistate outbreaks identified in 2017 linked to imported Maradol papayas from Mexico. For information on the other outbreaks, please visit the Reports of Salmonella Outbreak Investigations from 2017 webpage.

    Previous Investigation Updates

    Case Count Update

    Since the last update on September 1, 2017, ten more ill people from 7 states were added to this investigation.

    As of September 11, 2017, a total of 210 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (135), Salmonella Kiambu (59), Salmonella Agona (10), or Salmonella Gaminara (6) have been reported from 24 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to August 27, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 37. Some information is not available for all of the ill people. Among 205 ill people, 124 (60%) are female. Among 162 people, 109 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 168 people, 67 (40%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    Illnesses that occurred after August 11, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

    This investigation is ongoing and CDC will provide updates when more information becomes available.

    Case Count Update

    Since the last update on August 18, 2017, 28 more ill people from 12 states were added to this investigation.

    As of August 30, 2017, a total of 201 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (131), Salmonella Kiambu (57), Salmonella Agona (8), or Salmonella Gaminara (5) have been reported from 23 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to August 20, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 37. Some information is not available for all of the ill people. Among 196 ill people, 118 (60%) are female. Among 153 people, 101 (66%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 158 people, 65 (41%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    Illnesses that occurred after August 1, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

    Investigation Update

    As a result of this outbreak investigation, FDA has increased testing of papayas from Mexico to see if papayas from other farms are contaminated with Salmonella. Through this increased testing, FDA identified other types of Salmonella not linked to this outbreak on papayas from Caraveo Produce in Tecomán, Mexico and El Zapotanio in La Huerta, Mexico. FDA reports External that the shipments of papayas found to be contaminated were destroyed and were not distributed for sale in the United States. Papayas from these farms were distributed in the United States earlier this year, but FDA reports that no shipments of papayas from either farm are on the market in the United States because they are past their shelf life.

    Through a review of the PulseNet database, CDC identified two more outbreaks of people infected with Salmonella with the same DNA fingerprints as the Salmonella found on papayas from these two other farms. Available information indicates that illnesses in these two outbreaks are not linked to papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm and are being investigated separately. Summaries of the two outbreaks are provided below.

    Outbreak of Salmonella Newport and Salmonella Infantis Infections

    FDA testing identified Salmonella Newport and Salmonella Infantis in an imported papaya sample collected from Caraveo Produce in Tecomán, Mexico. CDC identified three people in the PulseNet database who were infected with the same DNA fingerprint of Salmonella Newport (2 people) or Salmonella Infantis (1 person). The ill people were reported from three states: Illinois, Massachusetts, and Michigan. All three people (100%) reported eating or possibly eating papayas in the week before illness started.

    Outbreak of Salmonella Urbana Infections

    FDA testing identified Salmonella Urbana in an imported papaya sample collected from El Zapotanio in La Huerta, Mexico. CDC identified six people in the PulseNet database who were infected with the same DNA fingerprint of Salmonella Urbana. The ill people were reported from three states: New Jersey (4), New York (1), and Pennsylvania (1). Of four people with information available, three (75%) reported eating or possibly eating papayas in the week before illness started.

    Because three separate outbreaks linked to papayas from different farms have been identified, CDC is concerned that papayas from several other farms in Mexico might be contaminated with Salmonella and have made people sick. FDA continues testing papayas from Mexico to see if other papayas from other farms are contaminated with Salmonella. Investigations are ongoing to determine if additional consumer warnings are needed beyond the advice not to eat papayas from specific farms that is given in this update. Updates will be provided when more information is available.

    Introduction

    Since the last update on August 11, 2017, 34 more ill people were added to this investigation from 11 states.

    As of August 16, 2017, 173 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51), Salmonella Thompson (111), Salmonella Agona (7), or Salmonella Gaminara (4) have been reported from 21 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 31, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 38. Some information is not available for all of the ill people. Among 169 ill people, 101 (60%) are female. Among 135 people, 91 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 136 people, 58 (43%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    Illnesses that occurred after July 18, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

    Investigation Update

    As was reported in the update on August 4, FDA External tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Investigators compared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing results of Salmonella isolates from the papayas to isolates from ill people in the CDC PulseNet database. CDC has now identified 11 people infected with the same strains of either Salmonella Agona (7) or Salmonella Gaminara (4). These 11 illnesses have been added to the case count for this outbreak. Among 5 for whom information was available, all 5 (100%) reported eating or possibly eating papayas in the week before becoming ill.

    This investigation is ongoing. Updates will be provided when more information is available.

    Introduction

    Since the last update on August 4, 2017, 32 more ill people were added to this investigation from 15 states.

    As of August 9, 2017, 141 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51) or Salmonella Thompson (90) have been reported from 19 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 27, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 39. Among 136 ill people with available information, 83 (61%) are female. Among 98 people with available information, 66 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 103 people with available information, 45 (44%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    Illnesses that occurred after July 14, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

    Investigation Update

    Based on information collected to date, CDC is now recommending that consumers not eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico. If consumers aren&rsquot sure if their Maradol papaya came from the Carica de Campeche farm, they should ask the place of purchase. When in doubt, don&rsquot eat it just throw it out. Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

    As was reported in the last update on August 4, FDA External tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. CDC is working to determine if there are any illnesses with these other types of Salmonella linked to this outbreak.

    This investigation is ongoing. Updates will be provided when more information is available.

    Introduction

    Since the last update on July 21, 2017, 64 more ill people were added to this investigation from 15 states.

    As of August 3, 2017, 109 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (48) and Salmonella Thompson (61) have been reported from 16 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 22, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 36. Among ill people, 63% are female. Among 74 people with available information, 50 (68%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 76 people with available information, 35 (46%) were hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    This outbreak can be illustrated with a chart showing the number of people who became ill each day. This chart is called an epidemic curve or epi curve. Illnesses that occurred after July 10, 2017 might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Salmonella Infection for more details.

    Investigation Update

    In ongoing interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of the 59 interviewed, 28 (47%) reported eating papayas. This proportion was significantly higher than results from a survey Cdc-pdf [PDF &ndash 29 pages] of healthy Hispanic people in which 16% reported eating papayas in the months of May and June in the week before they were interviewed.

    Investigators used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to learn more about the DNA fingerprint of the strains of Salmonella isolated from Maradol papayas that Maryland health officials collected from a grocery store in that state. Samples from these papayas yielded outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu and Salmonella Thompson. Both samples were from Caribeña brand Maradol papayas imported from Mexico. Investigators compared WGS results of Salmonella isolates from the papayas to clinical isolates from ill people in the PulseNet database.

    WGS showed that the Salmonella Kiambu papaya isolate is closely related genetically to Salmonella Kiambu isolates from ill people. WGS also showed that the Salmonella Thompson papaya isolate is closely related genetically to Salmonella Thompson isolates from ill people. This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from eating contaminated Maradol papayas imported from Mexico.

    FDA External tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Through this testing, the FDA has also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak.

    On August 5, Agroson&rsquos LLC recalled External certain Cavi brand Maradol papayas grown and packed by Carica de Campeche. The Cavi brand carries a purple, green and black sticker with the words &ldquocavi MEXICO 4395&rdquo in white. Only certain lot codes of Cavi brand Maradol papayas were recalled, because they were known to come from Carica de Campeche. Boxes provided to wholesalers are stamped with CARICA DE CAMPECHE on the upper left side of the box. Other Cavi papayas, sourced from other farms, were not recalled.

    FDA is working to identify other brands of papayas that may have originated from Carica de Campeche and facilitate recalls. More information is available on FDA&rsquos website.

    CDC and state and local public health partners are continuing laboratory surveillance through PulseNet to identify additional ill people and to interview them. Further investigation by FDA and regulatory officials is under way to determine the point in the supply chain where the papayas were contaminated. Updates will be provided when more information is available.

    Introduction

    CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) External are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Kiambu infections.

    Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. PulseNet is the national subtyping network of public health and food regulatory agency laboratories coordinated by CDC. DNA fingerprinting is performed on Salmonella bacteria isolated from ill people by using techniques called pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole genome sequencing (WGS). CDC PulseNet manages a national database of these DNA fingerprints to identify possible outbreaks. WGS gives a more detailed DNA fingerprint than PFGE.

    As of July 21, 2017, 47 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Kiambu have been reported from 12 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page. WGS showed that isolates from people infected with Salmonella Kiambu are closely related genetically. This close genetic relationship means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to June 28, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 27. Among ill people, 67% are female. Among 31 people with available information, 18 (58%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 33 people with available information, 12 (36%) report being hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

    This outbreak can be illustrated with a chart showing the number of people who became ill each day. This chart is called an epidemic curve or epi curve. Illnesses that occurred after June 23, 2017 might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Salmonella Infection for more details.

    Investigation of the Outbreak

    Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence collected to date indicate that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico are a likely source of this multistate outbreak. This investigation is ongoing.

    In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Eleven (44%) of 25 people interviewed reported eating papayas. This proportion was significantly higher than results from a survey Cdc-pdf [PDF &ndash 29 pages] of healthy Hispanic people in which 16% reported eating papayas in the months of May and June in the week before they were interviewed.

    An illness cluster in Maryland was identified. An illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating at the same restaurant location, attending a common event, or shopping at the same location of a grocery store in the week before becoming ill. In Maryland, several ill people reported eating papayas purchased from the same location of a grocery store. Salmonella Kiambu and Salmonella Thompson were isolated from samples collected from ill people. Investigating illness clusters provides critical clues about the source of an outbreak. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there.

    The Maryland Department of Health External collected papayas from the grocery store associated with the illness cluster to test for Salmonella. One sample yielded the outbreak strain of Salmonella Kiambu and another sample yielded Salmonella Thompson. Both samples were from Caribeña brand Maradol papayas imported from Mexico. WGS showed that the Salmonella Kiambu papaya isolate is closely related genetically to the Salmonella Kiambu isolates from ill people. This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from eating contaminated Maradol papayas. CDC is working to collect additional information to determine whether the recent Salmonella Thompson illness in Maryland is part of this multistate outbreak.

    On July 26, Grande Produce recalled External Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017. Based on the available evidence, CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico until we learn more about other possible brands that might be linked to this outbreak.

    CDC and state and local public health partners are continuing laboratory surveillance through PulseNet to identify additional ill people and to interview them. Further investigation by FDA and regulatory officials is under way to determine the point in the supply chain where the papayas were contaminated. Updates will be provided when more information is available.


    Salmonella outbreak linked to whole, fresh papayas from Mexico

    A salmonella outbreak is likely from whole papayas from Mexico, and people in six Northeastern states shouldn’t eat them, health officials advise.

    The FDA is increasing import screening for whole papayas and is investigating the more precise source of the Salmonella Uganda strain responsible for 62 illnesses, including 23 requiring hospital care.

    No recall was issued, but the agency “strongly advises” that importers, suppliers, distributors and food businesses in all states hold back fresh, whole papayas from Mexico. Officials hope to limit distribution of potentially contaminated fruit already in the supply chain. Products held beyond their expiration date should be thrown out.

    People reported most of the illnesses in six states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. People in those places should throw out whole papayas from Mexico, and businesses that provide food should not offer them until more is known about the outbreak.

    Investigators are using the PulseNet network from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to track the bacterial strain through public health laboratory tests of samples’ genetic makeup.

    The illnesses started on dates from Jan. 14 to June 8, with most occurring since April.


    62 People Sickened In Salmonella Outbreak Linked To Fresh Papayas, CDC Says

    PHILADELPHIA (CNN) — Sixty-two people in eight US states have fallen ill this year from Salmonella related to fresh papayas imported from Mexico, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The illnesses range from mid-January up to June 8, with the highest number occurring in April. Of those who’ve gotten sick, 23 have been hospitalized.

    So far, no deaths are reported.

    Salmonella, which rarely affects how food tastes or smells, lives in the intestinal tracts of animals, including birds and people.

    Sixty-two people in eight US states have fallen ill this year from Salmonella related to fresh papayas imported from Mexico, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    If you’re not sure where your papayas have come from, throw them out

    The CDC is advising folks in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island to avoid eating whole, fresh papayas from Mexico. They also say not to eat fruit salads or mixes including Mexican papayas.

    If you encounter papayas and have doubt about their country of origin, the CDC says to be on the safe side and throw them out. The agency recommends washing and sanitizing places where papayas are stored, including counter tops and refrigerator shelves.

    Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration wants importers, suppliers, distributors and other food service providers to halt sales across all states of papayas imported from Mexico.

    This year’s outbreak is associated with the Salmonella Uganda serotype (species) of the bacteria.

    Those who are infected can develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps between 12 and 72 hours following the initial exposure. Patients usually recover on their own in less than a week, but some people do need to be hospitalized.

    According to CDC data, 1.2 million Salmonella cases occur each year in the US, with about 450 of the cases leading to death.

    The-CNN-Wire&trade & © 2019 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.


    Salmonella outbreak in U.S. linked to ‘whole, fresh' papayas imported from Mexico

    LOS ANGELES - A salmonella outbreak in the U.S. has been linked to whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico, the CDC and FDA said in an announcement.

    The public health and regulatory officials warned the public not to eat, serve or sell the papayas or food that contains papaya from Mexico in the following six states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. 

    Sixty-two people have fallen ill in eight states: Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Texas, the CDC said. Twenty-three people have been hospitalized. 

    Most of the sick people in this outbreak are adults over 60 years old, the CDC said. 

    The illnesses began on dates ranging from Jan. 14, 2019 to June 8, 2019. 

    No deaths have been reported so far. 

    The CDC recommends that people throw the papayas from Mexico away, even if some of them have been eaten or if no one has gotten sick yet. The center also advises people wash and sanitize places where papayas were stored: countertops and refrigerator drawers or shelves. 

    Around 80 percent of U.S. papayas come from Mexican production, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    The FDA “strongly advises” importers, suppliers and distributors, as well as restaurants, retailers and other food service providers from all states to hold whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico. 

    Salmonella are a group of bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal illness and fever called salmonellosis, according to the FDA. 

    Around 12-72 hours after eating food contaminated with salmonella, most infected people develop diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps, the CDC said. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment. 

    But in some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized, as salmonella could spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body. 

    “More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal,” the FDA said.

    Those more likely to have a severe salmonella illness include: children younger than 5 years old, pregnant women, adults 65 years and older, according to the CDC. 

    Two years ago, there was another salmonella outbreak linked to papayas from Mexico.

    On March 17, 2017, the FDA investigated an outbreak and the CDC reported 20 cases in 3 states with 5 hospitalizations and 1 death.