New recipes

The Loftiest Souffle

The Loftiest Souffle

Here's a soufflé recipe by Michel Richard of Citronelle in Washington, D.C. Whip the whites until firm, but stop before they get too stiff.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter plus more, room temperature, for ramekins
  • 4 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan, divided
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup grated Gruyère, divided
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 4 large eggs, yolks and whites separated
  • 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum (optional)

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 400°. Brush ramekins with butter and place on a foil-lined baking sheet; sprinkle ramekins with 2 Tbsp. Parmesan (total). Chill for 20 minutes or, covered, up to 1 day.

  • Melt 3 Tbsp. butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add flour; whisk constantly for 30 seconds. Gradually whisk in milk; increase heat and bring to a boil, whisking constantly. Add remaining 2 Tbsp. Parmesan and 1/2 cup Gruyère; stir until melted. Add nutmeg and season with salt and pepper. Transfer béchamel to a medium bowl and cover with plastic wrap; set aside.

  • Place egg whites in a large bowl. Stir in a pinch of salt and xanthan gum, if using. Using an electric mixer, beat egg whites until firm but not stiff, 3–4 minutes.

  • Stir egg yolks into béchamel. Gently stir in 1/4 of beaten egg whites to loosen béchamel base, then gently fold in remaining egg whites just to combine, taking care not to deflate.

  • Divide mixture among ramekins; sprinkle with 1/2 cup Gruyère;. Run your finger around inside lip of ramekins, cleaning edges. Bake until soufflés rise, centers are set, and cheese is golden brown, 18–22 minutes. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 350 Fat (g) 26 Saturated Fat (g) 15 Cholesterol (mg) 280 Carbohydrates (g) 8 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 3 Protein (g) 20 Sodium (mg) 300Reviews Section

Download Now!

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with French Pastry Recipes . To get started finding French Pastry Recipes , you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these French Pastry Recipes I can get now!

I did not think that this would work, my best friend showed me this website, and it does! I get my most wanted eBook

wtf this great ebook for free?!

My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

wtffff i do not understand this!

Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.


The Best French Recipes from Food & Wine Classic in Aspen Chefs

Indulge in bouillabaisse, souffle, ratatouille, and so much more from some of the world's loftiest chefs.

Food lovers from around the world flock to The Food & Wine Classic in Aspen each year to sip, savor, and indulge in demos and dishes from some pretty incredible chefs. And somehow—maybe it&aposs the fresh mountain air, or just the sheer concentration of culinary talent𠅎verything picks up a little bit of a French accent. Whether you&aposre a festival veteran, a newbie. or just enjoying from afar, you&aposre sure to enjoy 10 of our favorite Francophile recipes from Classic chefs past and present.


Download Now!

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with French Pastry Recipes . To get started finding French Pastry Recipes , you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these French Pastry Recipes I can get now!

I did not think that this would work, my best friend showed me this website, and it does! I get my most wanted eBook

wtf this great ebook for free?!

My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

wtffff i do not understand this!

Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.


Download Now!

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with French Pastry Recipes . To get started finding French Pastry Recipes , you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these French Pastry Recipes I can get now!

I did not think that this would work, my best friend showed me this website, and it does! I get my most wanted eBook

wtf this great ebook for free?!

My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

wtffff i do not understand this!

Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.


Charlotte russe

What ever became of charlotte russe? Once upon a time, she was the queen of desserts. It’s time to bring back that golden age, when ladyfingers were ladyfingers and desserts did not shrink from simple grandeur.

A century and a half ago, charlotte russe swept the world and taught it to crave vanilla, spelling an end to centuries of flavoring desserts with rosewater. She remains one of the grandest vehicles for vanilla’s alluring flavor. And in case you hadn’t noticed, vanilla has become a luxury ingredient again.

But she didn’t rise by charm alone. A charlotte russe is an impressive thing, a stately ziggurat of a dessert, upholstered with ladyfingers and filled with a pudding as light as a cloud. The classic version is flavored with vanilla and served with fruit, but let’s reconceive it for a new century. Let’s update it with sophisticated partners such as espresso, bitter chocolate, liqueurs and all the riches of our farmers markets: mulberries, blood oranges, Fuyu persimmons, pluots. Any fruit you like is welcome in a charlotte.

Here’s the thing: You don’t have to be a trained patissier to make a charlotte russe. Queen charlotte is actually quite forgiving. (Keep this quiet.) You can buy the ladyfingers. The only part that involves real cooking is the filling, Bavarian cream -- another dessert that’s in unjustified eclipse.

The lush Bavarian cream is the part that amazes people. So why not simply serve the Bavarian? Why turn it into a charlotte? Two reasons. The ladyfingers edging the Bavarian make it neater and far easier to unmold, and it’s just grander that way. Today, as in the 19th century, charlotte russe is gloriously statuesque, reaching the loftiest heights a Bavarian can without compromising its plush, delicate texture.

What makes a charlotte a charlotte is that it’s shaped in a distinctive flowerpot mold. The earliest versions, which date from about 200 years ago, were actually baked in this mold. They were nowhere near as glamorous as charlotte russe, though. In place of a luxurious cream filling, their centers were stewed fruit, usually apples. Instead of ladyfingers, stale cake or bread was often used for lining the mold.

It’s assumed that apple charlotte was named after Queen Charlotte, the wife of George III of England. The royal family took a keen interest in agriculture the king was known as “Farmer George” and Charlotte was a patron of apple growers.

Charlotte russe was developed from the fruit charlotte by Antonin Careme, the father of French haute cuisine. He originally called it charlotte a la parisienne the “a la russe” part is assumed to have been tacked on around 1818 to honor the visiting czar of Russia, and possibly with the idea that the white Bavarian cream represented Russia, which the French imagined to be perpetually covered with snow.

What was a French chef doing adapting an English dessert? Apart from the fact that Careme had recently worked for the future George IV of England, French chefs had no qualms in those days about cooking English desserts such as “le pouding” and “le plomb-gateau” (plum cake). They just liked to make them fancier.

As it happens, Careme had also invented Bavarian cream (named for an aristocratic patron, not for Bavaria). His version was essentially a more substantial version of whipped cream, enriched with custard and stiffened with gelatin. Later in the 19th century, chefs would incorporate beaten egg whites as well, giving it a supernal lightness.

In Careme’s time, vanilla was still a very rare and expensive ingredient, gathered wild in Mexico. But in 1841, a freed slave named Edmond Albius invented a technique for pollinating vanilla which made it possible to mass-produce it.

Vanilla started appearing in ice cream and custard -- and above all in charlotte russe. Charlotte quickly became de rigueur in Europe and America. In “Directions for Cookery” (1851), Philadelphia-based Eliza Leslie remarked that charlotte russe was generally served at large parties, “and it is usual to have two or four of them.”

At the end of the 1870s, the classic recipe with added egg whites showed up, and after that, there was not only a deluge of recipes but the dish also began appearing on restaurant menus. In the 1890s, even ruffians at lowlife dives (the better sort of lowlife dive, anyway) were said to order what they called “charley ross.”

The charlotte russe craze continued well into the 1920s, when people were inventing wacky date-nut versions and “angel charlotte russe,” flavored with macaroons, almonds, cherries and marshmallows.

In the 1950s and 1960s, there were shortcut versions using pudding mix enriched with whipped cream as the filling and wholesome “oat squares” in place of ladyfingers. It was a sign that people no longer thought charlotte russe was something grand enough to work at.

In fact, it’s really quite an easy recipe. The only challenge is making the custard sauce (creme anglaise), which means heating milk, sugar and eggs to the point that the mixture starts to thicken -- you’ll notice that if you stop stirring, it doesn’t keep swirling merrily around in the saucepan but slows to a halt. The classic sign that it’s done is that the mixture will coat the back of a wooden spoon and not just drip off. This happens well before the boiling point the custard must not get above 180 degrees or it will curdle.

Then you remove it from the heat, add softened gelatin and chill it in the refrigerator, stirring occasionally, or you can speed up the process by stirring it over ice.

After that, all you have to do is whip, fold and wait whip, fold and wait. Beat egg whites (without a speck of egg yolk in them, of course, or they won’t beat high) until they form stiff peaks. Fold them carefully into the custard so that the air bubbles become evenly dispersed throughout. This is done by repeatedly scooping the custard up through the whites from the bottom of the bowl, rather than stirring around and around in the usual way.

If the gelatin hardens too fast, don’t despair. Set the bowl in a larger bowl of hot water and stir until it softens. Then chill until it starts to stiffen again. Once the egg whites are incorporated, chill the mixture until it starts to set. Whip cream and fold it in, and your work is over, except for scooping the Bavarian cream into the charlotte mold.

The traditional charlotte russe still is a grand thing, a terrific way to showcase vanilla once again, along with the berries of spring and early summer. To perk up packaged ladyfingers, we brush them with rum after unmolding, and serve each slice with a swirl of rich red strawberry coulis. (Other spirits or liqueurs, as well as fruit syrups, would also revivify packaged ladyfingers nicely.)

When you go shopping for ladyfingers, you find yourself in an Italian deli, because ladyfingers are mostly used for tiramisu these days. That gave us an idea: a tiramisu-style charlotte russe. Flavor the Bavarian with amaretto liqueur and layer it with grated bitter chocolate. Drench the ladyfingers just before serving with espresso and finish this plush dessert with a sweet, creamy sauce of espresso and coffee.

Call it charlotte misu. Or in ruffian-talk, maybe, Charley Meese.

The mold they didn’t break

You can mold a charlotte in a 2-quart souffle mold, but the ideal utensil is the charlotte mold. It has sloping sides for easy unmolding, and it’s 4 inches high -- ladyfinger height. It’s usable for other purposes such as custards and aspics.

The traditional charlotte mold is made of tinned steel, which has to be thoroughly dried after washing and preferably wiped with an oiled cloth as well. With heavy use, it will eventually have to be re-tinned.


8 Secrets For a Moist & Juicy Roast Turkey

How often have you beaten egg whites for a recipe? Soufflés, meringues, angel food cakes, and chiffon pies all depend on airy whites for their loft. And what about whipping cream? Not only is it the secret to ethereally light mousse (such as Raspberry & Blackberry Mousse) but whipped cream is also perfect for layering into strawberry shortcake, topping pie, or garnishing a simple ice-cream sundae.

As you whip egg whites or cream and the liquid billows into an airy mass, a similar transformation seems to occur in each. But plumes of whipped egg white and cream have less in common than you might think. They are alike in one important way, however: They’re both foams. Like soapsuds and the head on beer, beaten egg whites and whipped cream trap air in a soft network of stable bubbles.

Protein and fat stabilize bubbles

When you blow air through a straw into a glass of water, bubbles form and quickly disappear. But when you whisk air into egg whites or cream, bubbles form—and linger—because the proteins present in these viscous liquids stretch around bubbles and trap them.

Here’s where the foams differ: In whipped egg whites, proteins alone do all the bubble building. In whipped cream, proteins share the task with another substance—fat. This important distinction influences how cooks use beaten egg whites and whipped cream in recipes, so let’s take a closer look at how each forms.

Egg whites trap bubbles in a web of water and protein. Egg white is a mixture of protein (10%) and water. The action of beating creates bubbles and, at the same time, coaxes the coiled egg white proteins to uncurl and regroup into flexible mesh-like sheets that wrap around the bubbles. With continued whipping, the bubbles get smaller, and the froth thickens into a stable mass.

Fat: friend or foe? Whipped egg whites can billow up to eight times their original volume. But a drop of yolk or a little grease lingering in a mixing bowl can reduce the egg whites’ foaming power by two-thirds. That’s because the fat bonds with the egg proteins before they can bond with one another and form those mesh-like protein sheets necessary for trapping bubbles.

While the tiniest speck of fat is the downfall of whipped egg whites, in whipped cream, solid butterfat works with milk protein to build foam. Whipping chilled cream not only re orders milk proteins into films for bubble building, but it also causes the microscopic clusters of solid butterfat that are suspended in the cold liquid to surround and stabilize each bubble. If the butter fat gets warm and melts, however, the foam will collapse.

Foams are fussy

Egg whites whip to their greatest volume at about 70°F. When whites are warm, they don’t cling together as much, making it easier to incorporate air. Cream, on the other hand, whips best when the cream, the bowl, and the whisk are very cold (45°F or lower) and the butterfat is solid.

When it comes to choosing eggs for whipping, professional opinions differ. As eggs age, the whites become thinner and whip easily to great volume. Fresher eggs are more viscous so they take longer to beat, but some cooks think that the resulting foam is more stable. For making clouds of meringue in particular, we opt for older whites and extra volume and add a little cream of tartar to stabilize the foam. With cream, it isn’t age that affects fluffiness and stability, but fat content and temperature. Cream with more fat makes stiffer and more stable foam. Heavy cream, which is 36% to 40% fat, whips into stiff, stable foam whipping cream, at 30% to 36% fat, makes a softer, less stable foam.

How long to beat?

Recipes for soufflés and sponge cakes often say to whip the egg whites until soft peaks curl as you lift the beater. At this stage, the whites remain flexible, so they blend easily with other ingredients. But more important, the air bubbles are still elastic enough to expand in the oven. This allows the framework of a soufflé to stretch higher before its proteins coagulate and set in the heat of the oven.

For chilled or frozen desserts, like mousses, where there will be no further cooking after the eggwhite foam is added, creating a strong foam—as opposed to one that’s flexible enough to expand further in the oven—is the primary consideration. So beat the whites to the stiff (but not dry) stage. At this stage, the foam contains more tiny bubbles, and there’s strength in numbers.

Use ’em or lose ’em. Have you ever beaten whites to perfect medium-stiff peaks, turned away for a few moments to measure the other ingredients, and returned to fi nd your foam looking dry, clumpy, and overbeaten? That’s because egg-white foam exposed to air quickly begins to coagulate and lose its elasticity. So if you’re beating egg whites to soft peaks without sugar for a cake or soufflé, be sure to have all the remaining ingredients ready to go and add them as soon as the whites are beaten.

Overbeating makes foams flop. Beating makes foams expand, but it can’t go on indefinitely. If egg whites are whipped too long, the billowy foam becomes dry, clumpy, and too brittle to support a soufflé. Overbeaten cream poses another problem, as it separates into curds (butter) and whey (buttermilk).

Now that you know how foams work, the stage is set for the loftiest souffl és and lightest mousses you’ve ever made.


6. Pumpkin Cheesecake with Maple and Bourbon

If you're a fan of cheesecake, trying your hand at homemade is so worth the slow bake, all the time it takes to cool, and the hours of chilling.

Why it's difficult

Along with taking a good chunk of time to make, a cheesecake like this one has to be watched carefully. There are a few things that can go wrong, but cracks are the most common issue. Luckily, if you do end up with an unsightly fracture across the top of your cheesecake, you can easily cover it up with a sour cream topping.

Tips for success

  • Press your crust crumbs at least 1” or more up the sides of the springform pan to even out the overall thickness of the crust and allow for an easy un-panning later.
  • It’s very important that your cream cheese is at room temperature if you want a super smooth cheesecake batter. If your cream cheese isn't quite at room temperature or if you keep your house on the colder side, you can cube your cream cheese, place it on a plate, and microwave it for 20-30 seconds until it has the consistency of soft, spreadable butter.
  • This recipe is a little bit unique in the world of cheesecakes in that you aren’t using visual indicators, but simply time to determine whether your cheesecake is fully baked. Although it’s tempting to open the oven after the initial bake time to check it out, resist! As long as your oven temperatures are where they're supposed to be, you’ll be rewarded with a beautiful cheesecake after that hour of rest time in the oven, which is meant to allow the residual heat to continue cooking the batter. If you open the door at any point after turning the oven off, the heat will escape and you may end up with an underdone cheesecake.
  • When baking the sour cream toppingi t’s the same deal! Don’t worry about checking the jiggle of the filling or taking a quick peek inside the oven.

Download Now!

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with French Pastry Recipes . To get started finding French Pastry Recipes , you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these French Pastry Recipes I can get now!

I did not think that this would work, my best friend showed me this website, and it does! I get my most wanted eBook

wtf this great ebook for free?!

My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

wtffff i do not understand this!

Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.


Download Now!

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with French Pastry Recipes . To get started finding French Pastry Recipes , you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these French Pastry Recipes I can get now!

I did not think that this would work, my best friend showed me this website, and it does! I get my most wanted eBook

wtf this great ebook for free?!

My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

wtffff i do not understand this!

Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.


Watch the video: Souffle (October 2021).