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Chef Tom Colicchio's Grilling and Essentials Slideshow

Chef Tom Colicchio's Grilling and Essentials Slideshow

Essential Tools for Basic Grilling

Essential tools for basic grilling include: a limitless supply of charcoal, a good set of tongs, and a big pile of wood chunks. Since the quality of the wood you grill with really does affect the flavor of your food, I am particular about what I use. Baxter’s Original Premium Smoker Wood sources all their wood in Georgia, where they’re based, and they’re careful to make sure that it’s free of bark and debris.

Note: If you’ve never used smoker wood on your grill, it’s easy. Soak the chunks in water and then add them to smoldering briquettes in a charcoal grill, or into the smoke tray of a gas grill, and they’ll flavor whatever you’re cooking with a nice, wood-fired taste. A couple of chunks on a hot grill will mean a steak with just a hint of smoke, whereas a few cups of the stuff over low heat allows you to transform your grill into a smoker, capable even of turning out amazing, authentic barbecue ribs. Cook strip loin, with superb fat marble for the richest flavor, over moderate heat to medium-rare and you’ll wind up with some of the richest, most flavorful steaks of your life.

Get the Right Cutting Board

Cutting boards matter. A bad board — one that’s too small, flimsy, slippery, or uneven — will make chopping and slicing jobs a pain in the neck. Give yourself a good work surface and it changes everything — especially for preparing meats and vegetables for grilling and being efficient in doing so.

A Convenient and Portable Gas Grill

If you don’t have enough space to fit a big outdoor grill, use the Fuego Portable Gas Grill. It’s a high-quality tool and only 15 pounds — very portable. It’s equipped with a stainless steel burner that heats up to 650 degrees and it offers 159 square inches of grill space — enough to fit four burgers and as many hot dogs on the grill all at once. The steel frame construction means super durability, and an enameled cast-iron grill grate allows your cooking surface to get and stay hot enough to guarantee a good sear.

Favorite BBQ Sauce

For rich, spot-on flavors that complement meat rather than trying to outshine it, use Rufus Teague BBQ Sauce & Rub Bundle. These sauces and rubs are the real-deal and will get your summer grilling off on the right foot.

Go-To Condiment for Meat

If you are looking for a condiment to serve alongside a rich meat like lamb, try Kelly’s Spicy Green Tomato Chutney and Raisin Haters Apple Chili Chutney. They also transform a hunk of Cheddar, a slice of pate, or a simple ham sandwich.

Favorite Cuts of Meat

Wagyu, boneless rib-eyes and pork chops from DeBragga are supplied in my restaurants Colicchio & Sons, Craft, Craft Bar, and Craft Steak Foxwoods and work perfectly on the grill:

American Wagyu (aka "Kobe beef") strip steaks, the richest and most decadent steak on the market, sourced from Imperial Wagyu cattle raised in Nebraska. A little of this stuff goes a long way.

Boneless rib-eye steaks are sourced from naturally raised Angus cattle. These cattle are never fed any antibiotics, hormones, or animal-based protein supplements, and the meat is amazingly well marbled and tender.

Pork chops, from naturally raised Duroc and Berkshires hogs, free-ranging in Iowa, are nothing like the pork chops you’re used to from your local supermarket. It’s beautifully marbled, succulent, and sweet.


Top Chef secrets for a more organized kitchen: Tom Colicchio

SheKnows got some insider kitchen tips straight from the stars of Top Chef. We asked Tom Colicchio and Gail Simmons to share their secrets for staying organized in the kitchen. Here, we&rsquore in the kitchen with Tom Colicchio.


This Week on the Show

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Cook along with Rach to celebrate our 2,500th show! Crowd-pleasing pot pies are on the menu, and we're joined by some of our most memorable superfans.

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"GMA's" Lara Spencer is giving a tour of her home and dishing on her HGTV show, "Everything But The House." Then, Rachael's favorite storyteller, Harlan Coben, is back and talking about his book, Win. In her home kitchen, Rach is serving up Chicken Chow Fun.

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Priyanka Chopra Jonas is sharing childhood memories from her memoir Unfinished and filling us in on life with her husband, Nick Jonas. For dinner, Rachael&rsquos making a classic lentil soup. Plus, our former culinary producer, Grant Melton, shares delicious layered almond, raspberry and white chocolate cookie bites for dessert.

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Milk Street's Christopher Kimball is making tacos using his favorite kitchen gadgets. Meanwhile, Rachael's serving up stuffed eggplant boats for dinner. Plus, a gadget pro shares the hottest tech of 2021.

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Pitbull is hanging with Rach today! And Chef Geoffrey Zakarian is making Lemon Raspberry Pancakes with his daughters. Meanwhile, Rachael's serving up a delish twist on nachos.


Pro Cooking Tips from 16 of NYC's Best Restaurant Chefs

Last night's Edible Schoolyard NYC Spring Benefit left us full, happy, and inspired. In addition to getting amped up about spring (morel mushrooms and asparagus are, apparently, where it's at), we left wanting learn from the chefs about how we could make their style food at home. So we asked them: How can we cook your food, in our homes? Turns out, they're not just great cooks—they're fantastic teachers as well.

"Try using toasted nuts and seeds—like the savory granola we made for our lobster salad—as a garnish. Spice blends like dukkah are also a good place to start." — Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern

The Dish: Lobster salad with spinach and savory granola

"We buy fresh peas, shuck them, blanch them, and then freeze them. We keep them all year long so that when spring comes we can use them in soup. They are a burst of flavor and remind everyone of spring!" — Gavin Kaysen , Cafe Boulud

The Dish: Soupe de petits pois: onion soubise, jambon de Paris, pea shoot

"You have to shop well. Buy good ingredients. And don't go beyond your skill set—you're going to want to be able to socialize." — Jonathan Benno , Lincoln Ristorante

The Dish: Biscotti

"My style of food is not that scary—I don't use chemicals or crazy ingredients you can't find. And we pickle a ton, like pineapple . You can pickle just about anything. It adds a layer of acidity and brightness, and you can leave it in the fridge forever." — Joaquin Baca , Brooklyn Star

The Dish: Smoked pickled pineapple, jicama, serranos, cilantro

"The [goat] meat is absolutely delicious straight out of the roasting pan, and would make for an impressive Sunday night meal with some roasted potatoes and a vinegary salad. It's total 'set it and forget it'–style cooking and, and you can even surprise your friends and family. [They're going to say], 'This is goat!?'" — Brooks Headley , Del Posto

The Dish: Braised goat agnolotti with carrot and berbere

" All of our dishes are riddled with dried chiles —you can make your own, too. [Commercial] red pepper flakes are like white noise heat. Making your own gives heat and flavor, and you can use them for more than just Mexican food." — Alex Stupak , Empellon

The Dish: Sliced mango, arbol chile, lime, peekytoe crab salad

"Don't be scared! [Cooking] really isn't that hard. Especially the food I cook. So don't kill yourself. Take shortcuts . Go family-style." — Danny Bowien , Mission Chinese

The Dish: Suckling pig "David Chang"

"We don't waste anything. We utilize every part of our ingredients, like with our turnip greens . They're great raw, they're great cooked." — Alexandra Raij , Txikito

The Dish: Corned ham hock terrine, carola potato, turnip greens, deviled egg, manzanilla en rama

"Cooking with a cast-iron pan gives you an incomparable crust, for both vegetables and meat. To clean ours, we just douse it in oil and salt, burn it out, then wipe it clean." —* Justin Smillie , Il Buco & Vineria * **

The Dish: Cast-iron-seared octopus, fingerling potatoes, fava beans, pimentón

"If you want to cook rabbit at home, be sure not to overcook it—it's a very lean meat. You could braise it that would help. And balance the leanness with fat, like with a classic French mustard cream sauce." — Anita Lo , Annisa

The Dish: Black sea bass sashimi, trout roe, yuzu pearls, and shiso

For this event, we have to make our dishes at a small station setup instead of a full kitchen. It's important for us to plan ahead and figure out our limitations. It sounds simple, but it's a big part of cooking at home, too. When you're trying out a new dish or cooking for a large group, planning each step ahead of time will help you avoid making many mistakes." — David Chang , Momofuku

The Dish: Roasted baby beets, sunflower hozon, duck prosciutto

"Moisten the polenta before putting it into the liquid. That helps, but you really are just going to have to whisk it a lot . And listen: There's polenta, and then there's polenta. Don't buy instant polenta—that's nonsense. We buy ours from Anson Mills . — Tom Colicchio , Craft

The Dish: Porchetta: milk-fed pork, polenta, bitter greens, bacon jus

"You can use oats like you would use any other grain. They're not just breakfast." — Frederik Berselius , Aska

The Dish: Oats and onions

"Listen to your grandmother…and listen to the Franks when they say our book is an easy guide to simply the finest. Oh, and check out this video ." — Frank Falcinelli , Prime Meats

The Dish: Vitello tonnato

Home cooks should practice their dish as much as possible. Practice, practice, practice . Rich Torrisi , Torrisi Italian Specialties

The Dish: Duck maraschino

"A little bit of sweet helps balance things. We use more natural sweeteners, like maple syrup and honey—not refined sugar—in our savory dishes. There's an earthy, subdued sweetness that doesn't overpower things." — Kevin Pemoulie , Thirty Acres

The Dish: Salt cod tortellini in kohlrabi broth

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Guiltless grilling tips

Grilling outdoors with family and friends is one of the best parts about the summer, but attending gathering after gathering can be hard on your diet, as it’s hard to avoid snacking, eating heavy mayonnaise-based salads, and drinking beer or sugary drinks. While there’s nothing wrong with having a good time, if the good time stops you from feeling good, well, then that’s a problem.

To avoid feeling badly about the fun times spent with friends and family, we’ve turned to Allison Stowell, a dietician for "Guiding Stars," to share some helpful tips on how to enjoy backyard barbecues without the guilt. The basics? Incorporating more healthful foods that are packed with whole grains, fiber, minerals, and vitamins to keep you feeling full and satisfied.

Along with her helpful tips, she’s shared a couple of recipes to get you started on the right track. Enjoy and happy eating!

Stowell says to "never eat directly from the chip bowl." Instead, she suggests portioning out what is your ideal amount to eat and that will decrease your chances of overeating.

It’s often said that people turn to food because they mistake thirst for hunger. On a similar note, Stowell recommends staying hydrated with calorie-free, refreshing drinks like water, seltzer, and Crystal Light Pure or other mixes.

3. Add Grilled Vegetables as a Side

Instead of loading up on potato salad or carb-filled side dishes, Stowell suggests balancing out the meal with a side of grilled vegetables instead.


Ratatouille

A small, furry mouse named Remy (Patton Oswalt) has a keen sense of taste and aspires to be a gourmet chef, and after messing around in a French restaurant he reveals himself to a human in hopes to advance his cooking skills. In the world of animated films, turning a mouse into a Michelin-worthy chef is the farthest plot from my mind—the idea of a mouse running around a kitchen and touching food is a pretty strong turn-off—but Remy finds the perfect blend of spices and the animation makes you feel like the aromas are wafting through your television and into your own home.

Where to watch: Disney+


Chef Tom Colicchio's Grilling and Essentials Slideshow - Recipes

Over the last decade, Sunday Dinner Club has built a community of thousands of diners, made up of everyday people, chefs, farmers, and friends.

SDC is a dinner party-ish experience that currently operates in the great city of Chicago. Menus change monthly, and each menu centers around a theme and highlights locally sourced ingredients reflective of the current season. Dinners are held 10-15 times a month and seat up 24 guests. and the dinners are not just on Sundays.

At SDC, relationships are built, chefs explore their food curiosities, real food is made and served with care, and the gap between diner, chef, and farmer is narrowed.

We believe the truth about cooking is that there is no “right” way. The best way, the rightest way, is the way that finds a visceral reaction. In a world of Facebooks, smart phones, and online stock trades, cooking remains an in your face, hands on, immediate, and messy proposition. As products of our times, cooking is an escape - an act that can reclaim a history and a place to connect, in the most personal and physical ways possible. With your hands, your nose, your eyes, ears, mouth and body.

We fall for foods, we dream about flavors, and we carry them with us through our lives. And as in love and attraction -- we don’t always know exactly why we fall for the people, or the bites of food we yearn for. We just do.

We have found this feeling at SDC. We find it in our dining room, in our food, and our menus, all of which we’ve loved along the way.


3. Roast your spices before rubbing them on your turkey.

To get the most out of peppercorns and other whole spices, Padma Lakshmi recommends roasting them in a sauté pan and then crushing them with a mortar and pestle to bring out the flavors before using in a turkey brine. The spice blend she uses consists of black pepper, cinnamon sticks and star anise. They can all be whole seeds or dry powder. She then lines the inside of the bird (not the outside — or else it would burn!) with the blend.


Luke Holden

Favorite Lobster Roll: The Lobster Shack in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

"The Lobster Shack in Cape Elizabeth is my second favorite lobster roll. Always fresh, locally sourced lobster meat served in a butter and grilled split-top bun. Mayo is optional (perfect) and the view while enjoying the roll can't be beat. The Lobster Shack sits on a point overlooking some of the lobster grounds that I once fished! Like our own roll, the focus is on the high quality lobster meat, a naturally red food, making our partnership with EAT (RED) SAVE LIVES campaign this month a perfect fit. Our goal with the partnership is to drive awareness and funds to make a real, tangible impact on the campaign."


Community Reviews

I&aposm a pretty good cook. I&aposm no Anne Burrell, but I have enough of a handle on the skills and techniques that I can go off-recipe and make my own food.

So this summer I decided I would learn to master the grill and use it as comfortably as I use my stove. If I could have only one cookbook for the rest of my life (Other than Joy of Cooking), this might be it.

This is a true, step by step "how-to" book. This is that book. It walks you through how to choose a grill based on your needs. It&aposs one of t I'm a pretty good cook. I'm no Anne Burrell, but I have enough of a handle on the skills and techniques that I can go off-recipe and make my own food.

So this summer I decided I would learn to master the grill and use it as comfortably as I use my stove. If I could have only one cookbook for the rest of my life (Other than Joy of Cooking), this might be it.

This is a true, step by step "how-to" book. This is that book. It walks you through how to choose a grill based on your needs. It's one of the most balanced discussions of gas vs charcoal and each recipe contains instructions for both. I can start a fire, but this shows how to build and control the fire. When to use sauce vs marinade and when to put on a sauce depending on the type of sauce. There are relatively few recipes - only 1 per technique. But that's all you need to learn "How to Grill". I'm already starting to think off-recipe - "What about this? How would this taste?"

If you want to learn how to use your grill/bbq, this is the book you want to buy. After this, you can move on to Bobbie Flay or whoever strikes your fancy. . more

What I like most about this book is that it includes grilling and barbecuing techniques and recipes from all over the world. Asia, Marocco, the Balkans, Caribbean, South America. you name it!

The book contains every information you might need to bring your grilling to a new level or even to start you off if you&aposre a beginner - from tips and tricks to actual recipes, all included with step by step illustrations.

Having already tried a few of the recipes I can safely say that this is so far my fav What I like most about this book is that it includes grilling and barbecuing techniques and recipes from all over the world. Asia, Marocco, the Balkans, Caribbean, South America. you name it!

The book contains every information you might need to bring your grilling to a new level or even to start you off if you're a beginner - from tips and tricks to actual recipes, all included with step by step illustrations.

Having already tried a few of the recipes I can safely say that this is so far my favourite book on grilling and I'm sure I'll be picking it up again and again for years to come! . more

When this book was taken off the shelf for a "RETRO review" this reviewer first needed to do a double take. Can this really be 10 years old? Its design and styling look as if it had been a 2012 season release. Here is a very thick, heavy book full of advice about how to grill food outdoors. An antidote to burnt sausages and singed corn.

After a time you can get a little fatigued by the sheer number of barbecue and grill-related books that pop up each spring, eager to catch the next crop of people When this book was taken off the shelf for a "RETRO review" this reviewer first needed to do a double take. Can this really be 10 years old? Its design and styling look as if it had been a 2012 season release. Here is a very thick, heavy book full of advice about how to grill food outdoors. An antidote to burnt sausages and singed corn.

After a time you can get a little fatigued by the sheer number of barbecue and grill-related books that pop up each spring, eager to catch the next crop of people who want to 'live the life and master the grill'. Despite an outdoors grill or barbecue seemingly being a simple thing to do, it can be a deceptively simple process - that is to say simple in principle but in practice. There are certainly many grill books that feature very nice recipes but there are not so many really good ones that teach you the essentials and how-tos of grilling. This is one of those books. Perhaps there is something about many males and asking for help or consulting a reference work such as this.

While the book is written from an American perspective there should be no real practical differences to the information being given out. The book starts with the very basics, such as the best spot to locate your grill, safety concerns and hygiene before considering the different ways in which you can grill something and the various panoply of equipment that is theoretically at your disposal. At the end of the book there is a great little overview to show the different types of grills, how they can fit together and, as you would expect for a typically male-dominated sort of thing, there are lots of very essential and not-so-essential toys, sorry accessories, too. There is a listing for some mail order sources but these may be outdated and not so much use for non-U.S. readers. Just use the Internet to find a source.

The interminable argument of gas versus charcoal as your grill's fuel source will never seem to be resolved as proponents from each side will always throw up enough convincing arguments to bolster their point. This reviewer favours both as both are very good tools for different tasks. Fear not, dear reader, as here you are given advice for both forms of grilling and you are able to make your own determination. Other related forms of outdoor grilling such as smoking are touched upon too.

What this reviewer really liked about this book was how it takes the reader through the real basics. Far too many books of this kind give a hazy overview and then go straight into the recipes, which is OK for the more accomplished griller but for the newcomer it can be a scary proposition. If you look at the start of the meat section by means of an example, firstly the reader is shown exactly how to grill a prime rib - all from the best way to set up the grill, how to cut and prepare the meat and right up to testing it is done. Lots of great full-colour pictures underline the excellent, simple-to-read text. There are over one thousand pictures in this book alone and they make a practical difference. Other related recipes also then appear alongside.

Attention-to-detail and thoroughness has been the keyword from the first page to the last. All of the different key ingredients get their own chapters as well as the accompaniments such as sauces and rubs. Each chapter and ingredient comes under similar scrutiny. This book just works on so many levels. To round it off there is an excellent index too.

This is a great example of a book that meets and surpasses its objectives. Despite it being a few years old it still can kick the backside of many new upstarts. If you are truly an experienced drillmaster (and not just full of hot air and male pride) maybe you won't get as much out of this book than one with just recipes - but then again will you accept that someone else might have some other good ideas? At the very least this book is worth a skim through at the bookstore. If you will admit you are either a total grill virgin or a very hapless amateur, this book has the power to "make you a man".

How to Grill, written by Steven Raichlen and published by Workman Publishing. ISBN 9780761120148, 512 pages. Typical price: GBP12. YYYYY.