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If You Think You’re Low Class, You’re More Likely to Eat Junk Food

If You Think You’re Low Class, You’re More Likely to Eat Junk Food

A study found that cravings for junk food and fast food were triggered by thoughts of being poor

Are you carefully watching your bank account balance? You’ll be more likely to eat fast food.

Not only are people with lower incomes more likely to have bad eating habits, but it turns out the effect is psychological, too. A study recently published by researchers at the University of Michigan found that the mere thought of being lower-class led to junk-food and fast-food cravings.

In four studies that each surveyed 500 people, the researchers found that people who were primed to feel like they were of a lower socioeconomic status ate high-calorie, high-fat content foods like pizza and burgers. In other words: The emptier you think your wallet is, the more likely you are to instinctively stock up on high-calorie foods and snacks.

“Our results demonstrate that among humans, the experience of low social class may contribute to preferences and behaviors that risk excess energy intake,” the researchers concluded. “These findings suggest that psychological and physiological systems regulating appetite may also be sensitive to subjective feelings of deprivation for critical nonfood resources (e.g., social standing).”

Psychological factors, therefore, may play more of a role in obesity than previously thought.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


5 Ways to Make Healthier Decisions When You're Exhausted

Here's how to stay healthy when you're running on empty.

Life has handed most of us some pretty major stressors over the past year. It&aposs safe to say many of us are more depleted than ever. You&aposd think this would mean we&aposd be even more determined to keep our healthy habits and future health goals on the rails, but our collective exhaustion is actually causing the opposite to happen.

"In my clinical work, I see people making more unhealthy decisions than usual right now because of the way our current reality negatively impacts mood," says Naomi Torres-Mackie, Ph.D., New York-based clinical psychologist and head of research at The Mental Health Coalition. "The worse your mood is, often the harder it becomes to make healthy choices."

Healthy choices require forethought, energy and motivation𠅊ll things that are MIA when we&aposre exhausted, a time when impulsive decisions typically reign supreme. "This is because our executive functioning (which is involved in planning and decision-making) is decreased when we&aposre tired, so we tend to make decisions that will feel good in the immediate or short-term, as opposed to thinking long-game," explains Torres-Mackie.

As much as we want to follow the usual advice of setting health goals, incorporating healthy habits into our schedule and sticking to a routine, it&aposs extremely difficult in the situation many of us are living in to make these advanced plans and stick to them, especially without the typical day-to-day structure we&aposre used to.

"Many of the general recommendations that health experts rely on may not be as impactful in the setting of unstructured days or significant day-to-day variations that are beyond our control," says Jessica Tosto, RD, clinical coordinator for the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University&aposs College of Health Professions in New York.


Watch the video: Η γεννά μου με προβλήματα υγείας. MARIANNA TSIANAKA (December 2021).