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Cops Called as Cows Invade a UK Supermarket as Part of Dairy Farmer Protest

Cops Called as Cows Invade a UK Supermarket as Part of Dairy Farmer Protest

UK dairy farmers brought their cows to a local supermarket to protest the low returns they get from selling milk

Mooove over, shoppers. We want fairer prices!

Customers in Stafford, England, were pretty confused this week when a herd of cows visited an Asda grocery store. But these bovines weren’t terribly lost — dairy farmers actually brought them there as a symbol of protest over how little farmers are paid by supermarkets for the milk they produce.

According to The Telegraph, right now, milk is cheaper than a bottle of water. The group of heifers was accompanied by 70 protestors urging supermarkets like Asda to change their prices.

However, the police were apparently not impressed by the cow protest, and were called to intervene. Dairy farmers all over the UK have been protesting what they call the unsustainable dairy industry. The average cost of producing a liter of milk is approximately $0.45, but dairy company Arla has been selling it for $0.35 cents per liter to supermarkets like Asda, according to AOL.

“Our milk is supplied by the Arla farmer cooperative,” Asda supermarket said in a statement. “The Arla dairy cooperative is owned by farmers. We moved to this model after guidance from those who were supplying us and means the price received by our farmers is set by their own cooperative business.”


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]


2008 Chinese milk scandal

The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was a significant food safety incident in China. The scandal involved milk and infant formula along with other food materials and components being adulterated with melamine. The chemical was used to increase the nitrogen content of diluted milk, giving it the appearance of higher protein content in order to pass quality control testing. Of an estimated 300,000 victims, [1] 6 babies died from kidney stones and other kidney damage and an estimated 54,000 babies were hospitalized. [2] [3]

The scandal was first exposed on 16 July, after sixteen babies in Gansu Province were diagnosed with kidney stones. [cm 1] The babies were fed infant formula produced by the Shijiazhuang-based Sanlu Group, then one of the leading producers of infant formula in the country. After the initial focus on Sanlu, further government inspections revealed that products from 21 other companies were also tainted, including those from Arla Foods–Mengniu, Yili, and Yashili. [4]

The issue raised concerns about food safety and political corruption in China and damaged the reputation of the country's food exports. The World Health Organization called the incident "deplorable" and at least 11 foreign countries halted all imports of Chinese dairy products. A number of drumhead trials were conducted by the Chinese government resulting in two executions, three sentences of life imprisonment, two 15-year prison sentences, [5] and the firing or forced resignation of seven local government officials and the Director of the Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ). [6]

In late October 2008, similar adulteration with melamine was discovered in eggs and possibly other food. The source was traced to melamine being added to animal feed, despite a ban imposed in June 2007 following the scandal over pet food ingredients exported to the United States. [7]