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World’s Oldest Man Dies at 113 After a Lifetime of Fresh Vegetables and Red Wine

World’s Oldest Man Dies at 113 After a Lifetime of Fresh Vegetables and Red Wine

Francisco Nunez Oliviera, the world’s oldest man, died this week in Spain at the age of 113. 96-year-old Betty White, for example, says she owes her long life to vodka and hot dogs. Francisco Nunez Oliviera’s diet sounds much more likely to get a thumbs-up from one’s doctor, though, because he said he lived 113 years eating mainly vegetables, with a daily glass of red wine.

According to the Daily Mail, Oliviera was born in Bienvenida in Badajoz, in southwest Spain, in 1904. He lived there his whole life, and his many relatives credit his astonishing longevity to the fact that his diet was based mostly on vegetables he grew on his own land. He also enjoyed a daily glass of red wine.

According to Oliviera’s family, he had the same breakfast every day: a slice of sponge cake made with olive oil, and a glass of milk.

Oliviera was the oldest man in the world, but his town reportedly has a very large number of very long-lived people. Oliviera’s hometown has a population of just around 2,200 people, and 31 of those are currently over 90 years old. In addition to many children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, Oliviera is survived by two younger siblings, who are 95 and 93 years old.

Oliviera’s family says he was in good health throughout his life, too. Even though he lived to 113 years old, they say he was only in the hospital twice, and one of those times was for cataract surgery. His daughter said he was in good health and did not have any pain or illnesses, in spite of his advanced age.

100-year-old French barmaid Marie Lou Wirth also passed the century mark recently, but she credits her long life with never eating fruit or dairy, though she said she does enjoy a glass of wine sometimes, in moderation. And 102-year-old Eunice Modlin from Indiana credits her own lifespan to chocolate and naps, which is just one of the many reasons to eat dark chocolate every day.


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


History of vegetarianism

The earliest records of vegetarianism as a concept and practice amongst a significant number of people are from ancient India, especially among the Hindus [1] and Jains. [2] Later records indicate that small groups within the ancient Greek civilizations in southern Italy and Greece also adopted some dietary habits similar to vegetarianism. [3] In both instances, the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence toward animals (called ahimsa in India), and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers. [4]

Following the Christianization of the Roman Empire in late antiquity (4th–6th centuries), vegetarianism nearly disappeared from Europe. [5] Several orders of monks in medieval Europe restricted or banned the consumption of meat for ascetic reasons, but none of them abstained from the consumption of fish these monks were not vegetarians, but some were pescetarians. [6] Vegetarianism was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance [7] and became a more widespread practice during the 19th and 20th centuries. The figures for the percentage of the Western world which is vegetarian varies between 0.5% and 4% per Mintel data in September 2006. [8] [ citation needed ]


Watch the video: Worlds Oldest Man Dies Aged 112 in Japan (December 2021).