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Rabbit with capers, sultanas and pine nuts recipe

Rabbit with capers, sultanas and pine nuts recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Game
  • Rabbit

A quick and tasty way to prepare rabbit, this is a unique dish with an exotic combination of flavours. Serve with rice.

23 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 rabbit, cut into pieces
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 carrot, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 200g passata
  • 125ml white wine
  • 1 tablespoon capers
  • 1 teaspoon sultanas
  • 1 teaspoon pine nuts

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:40min ›Ready in:1hr

  1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the rabbit and brown on all sides. Add the onion, carrot and rosemary.
  2. Once the rabbit is browned, season with salt and pepper. Add the passata and pour the white wine over the rabbit. Add the capers, sultanas and pine nuts and continue cooking over high heat for a few minutes. Turn down the heat, mix well and cover with a lid. Let everything cook on low heat until the sauce is thick and the rabbit is cooked through.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(3)

Reviews in English (1)

This was really good. I made exactly as stated and we all loved it. Thanks for posting the recipe-12 Sep 2012


Tang With A Twist

TANG WITH A TWIST

There’s more to sweet and sour than bright orange Chinese pork.

Sweet-and-sour pork was probably the first restaurant dish I had in Australia. It was in a suburban Sydney Chinese restaurant more than 40 years ago and I remember it for its DayGlo orange colour and tangy honey and sugar flavours.

It’s still a mainstay of Australian Chinese restaurant menus. That sweet-sour flavour paired with fatty meat is so damn good.

That sweet-sour flavour paired with fatty meat is so damn good.

Many countries have sweet-and-sour dishes. And it’s not always simply the sugar-vinegar combination that achieves the familiar flavour.

Vietnam has sweet-and-sour fish soup, the sweet coming from pineapple and the sour from tamarind paste. The Thai version also uses the sourness of tamarind but balances it with palm sugar.

The Japanese use mirin, a sweet vinegar, combined with ”sweet” dashi stock for satoimo nakake (taro in sweet-and-sour sauce).

Around the Mediterranean, the combination is primarily wine vinegar and sugar, though grapes – both fresh and dried – are used for sweetness. Grape juice can also provide both sweet and sour elements: sweet in the form of concentrated must (also called saba or vincotto in Italy) and sour using verjuice from unripe grapes.

SWEET AND SOUR CHICKEN

  • 1.5kg chicken thighs
  • 2 onions
  • 250ml dry red wine
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Salt
  • 6 peppercorns
  • 1/2 cup plain flour
  • 6 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp finely diced pancetta
  • 2 celery hearts, finely chopped
  • 10 green olives, flesh removed and chopped
  • 1 tbsp capers
  • 50g sultanas
  • 50g pine nuts
  • 1 tbsp castor sugar
  • 4 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 tbsp chopped parsley

Six to 8 hours before cooking, rinse and pat dry chicken thighs. Place in a bowl. Peel and thinly slice 1 onion and place in a pot with red wine, 1 bay leaf, 1 tsp salt and the peppercorns. Bring to boil for a minute then remove from heat. Once cooled, pour over chicken, cover and refrigerate. When ready to cook, drain and pat dry. Dust chicken with flour and fry until golden using half the olive oil. Heat remaining oil in a casserole dish and lightly fry pancetta, remaining onion (finely chopped), celery, olives, capers, sultanas, pine nuts and remaining bay leaves for a minute. Add chicken, a couple of pinches of salt and stir on low heat. Dissolve sugar in a bowl with vinegar and add to chicken. Mix, cover with lid and cook on low heat for 10-12 minutes, adding water if too dry. Season, stir in parsley and serve.

Serves 6 as a main

Wine Barbera or dolcetto

SWEET AND SOUR PRAWNS

  • 24 medium-sized prawns
  • 80g sultanas or seedless raisins
  • 3 tbsp rice flour or plain flour
  • 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Pinch of ground cinnamon
  • Salt and pepper
  • 30ml strained lemon juice
  • 1 tsp white wine vinegar

Peel prawns, leaving tails on, and remove digestive tracts. Place sultanas in a bowl and cover with tepid water. Soak for at least 30 minutes. Dust prawns with flour and shake off excess. Heat olive oil in a wide pan and gently fry prawns on medium heat for 30-45 seconds on each side. Add cinnamon, a couple of pinches of salt and a turn or two of pepper. Remove pan from heat. Using tongs, remove prawns (keeping juices in pan) and set aside. Drain sultanas and squeeze to remove excess water. Return to heat and add sultanas, lemon juice and vinegar. Simmer and keep stirring until liquid has reduced to a tablespoon or so. Return prawns for a few seconds then serve.


Italy’s best traditional regional pies and stuffed breads

Luciana Squadrilli sheds light on Italy’s love affair with the pie, ranging from the pumpkin-topped farinata of Liguria in the north to the stuffed doughs of Puglia in the south.

Luciana Squadrilli is a freelance journalist and author specialising in food and travel writing.

Luciana Squadrilli is a freelance journalist and author specialising in food and travel writing.

You might think the closest thing Italy gets to a pie is pizza, but in fact there are a whole host of different regional varieties. The glorious ensemble of crust (which can be bread, pastry or dough) with sauce and cheese (and any other possible combination of ingredients) comes in many different guises. Whilst the word ‘pie’ tends to refer to a savoury filling encased in pastry in places like the UK, in Italy it also covers many of the country’s stuffed or topped breads.

In Italy you’ll find many other delicious foods under the broad classification of pizza rustica – sometimes also called torta rustica – which includes almost every kind of dough-based recipe, including savoury pies. Different kinds of pastry or dough are often stuffed or topped with flavourful vegetables or cheeses, yet there is a huge array of possible fillings and ingredients ranging from rice to fish. Often created as a way to make humble ingredients as filling as possible, today these pies are real gastronomic treats. Usually eaten as part of a rich antipasti platter on special occasions and festivities, savoury pies are also favourites for a quick lunch or substantial snack. Here are some of the country’s most famous and beloved.


CLUB MEXICANA’S BBQ PULLED JACKFRUIT

Pulled jackfruit is the vegan.

Vegan Chilli Vegetable Pizza

These chilli pizzas are a.

Brazilian Grilled Pineapple [Vegan]

Credit to SoccerNut @ allrecipes.com

VEGAN Tofu Vegetable Kebabs with.

After reading this tofu kebab.

Simple Vegan Potato Salad

Creamy, vegan potato salad made.

These are just a few of the many recipes for cooking on a barbecue, there is so much more than just a sausage or burger to explore. Remember if you need to buy click on the link below . Happy BBQ-ing .

© 2017 Rectella International.

| Bar-Be-Quick | The home of the "original" disposable barbecue. since 1986. | Call +44 (0)1282 478200 | Rectella International Ltd Bancroft Road Burnley Lancs BB10 2TP.


Ragoût of lamb with Provençal róse wine, tomatoes and flageolets

From Rick Stein's French Odyssey: Over 100 New Recipes Inspired by the Flavours of France Rick Stein's French Odyssey by Rick Stein

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  • Categories: Stews & one-pot meals Main course French
  • Ingredients: flageolet beans lamb shoulder onions garlic tomato purée tomatoes rosé wine chicken stock bouquet garni parsley tubetti pasta

On a Clare Day – Beef cheeks in red wine

On a Clare Day might be one of our favourite pun titles, but it’s also a wonderful book, and is launching today as part of the Clare Valley Gourmet Weekend. Jeni and Burt Surmon’s tale of leaving their city life to start a winery includes a number of delicious recipes, a few which of course incorporate some of their Mt Surmon wines! These beef cheeks sound like exactly the thing for an Autumn Sunday lunch.

Beef (calf) cheeks in red wine

Ingredients for 4 servings

1 x 400 g tin of tomatoes

1 red capsicum, chopped

2 sticks celery, chopped

5 cloves garlic, chopped

handful of parsley, chopped

2 springs of sage, chopped

2 sprigs of rosemary, chopped

4 sprigs of thyme, chopped

salt, pepper, grated nutmeg

half a bottle of Nebbiolo (Mt Surmon or otherwise!)

Wash the cheeks well. Put half of the oil into a large saucepan and sauté the cheeks until brown on both sides. Remove the cheeks.

Add the remaining oil, vegetables, tinned tomatoes and tomato paste to the pot, cook for a few minutes then add the garlic, spices and herbs, and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to stop from sticking, in which case add a little stock.

Now add the cheeks, stock and red wine. Reduce the heat, put the lid on and cook gently for 5 hours.

Want to know what it’s like to start a winery? Find our more about On a Clare Day here.


CLUB MEXICANA’S BBQ PULLED JACKFRUIT

Pulled jackfruit is the vegan.

Vegan Chilli Vegetable Pizza

These chilli pizzas are a.

Brazilian Grilled Pineapple [Vegan]

Credit to SoccerNut @ allrecipes.com

VEGAN Tofu Vegetable Kebabs with.

After reading this tofu kebab.

Simple Vegan Potato Salad

Creamy, vegan potato salad made.

These are just a few of the many recipes for cooking on a barbecue, there is so much more than just a sausage or burger to explore. Remember if you need to buy click on the link below . Happy BBQ-ing .

© 2017 Rectella International.

| Bar-Be-Quick | The home of the "original" disposable barbecue. since 1986. | Call +44 (0)1282 478200 | Rectella International Ltd Bancroft Road Burnley Lancs BB10 2TP.


Your Spanish Recipes

Some people do believe that tapas started in Andalusian taverns (s outhern province of Spain). The word "tapa" can be translated as "cover". This was a practical measure meant to prevent fruit flies from hovering over the sweet sherry (see below for more explanations). Tapas traditionally have been a complementary piece of sliced ham served on top of a glass of wine, however we know them today as small portions of food typically served as a snack before lunch or dinner. Tapas can be as simple as a bowl of olives or slices of Serrano ham.
Others believe that the tapa was born when the Spanish king Alfonso the 10th was ill. The Wise had to take small bites of food with some wine between meals. Once recovered from the disease, the wise king decreed that no wine was to be served in any of the inns in the land of Castile, unless accompanied by something to eat. This was a wise precaution to counteract the adverse effects of alcohol on those people who, through lack of money to buy a nourishing meal drank alcohol on an empty stomach. Apart from the story of the royal disease we should consider the theory that the tapa first appeared because of the need of farmers and workers of other unions to take a small amount of food during their working time, which allowed them to carry on working until time for the main meal. This main meal, rich in fat, was so heavy to digest that a "siesta" had to be taken for a couple of hours before going back to the fields or to the workshop. Longer working hours in the morning meant an easier workload after the meal.

Another popular explanation says that King Alfonso XIII stopped by a famous tavern in Cádiz (Andalusian city) where he ordered a cup of wine . The waiter covered the glass with a slice of cured ham before offering it to the king, to protect the wine from the beach sand, as Cádiz is a windy place. The king, after drinking the wine and eating the tapa, ordered another wine "with the cover"

Wine was the natural accompaniment to this snack, as it induced a mellow mood and increased strength, while in winter it warmed the body as protection against very cold days in the fields and in the workshops of the Middle Ages. In summer, the drink taken in the South was "gazpacho" (cold tomato soup), instead of wine, which increased body heat rather than providing the necessary cold refreshment.

The snack is called "alifara" in northern Spain , Aragón and Navarra and later, in the Vasque Country, it began to be called "poteo", because the wine had to be drunk in "potes" (jars).

50 Simple Salads

Toss together one of these fresh and easy combos from Food Network Magazine for your next party.

Related To:

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Watermelon-Feta Salad, Jicama-Mango Slaw, Spanish and Orzo Salad

Watermelon-Feta Salad, Jicama-Mango Slaw, Spanish and Orzo Salad

Though tossed salads are a great way to add a healthy touch to your lunch or dinner time, they often get a bad rap for being bland or boring. Not this time! Packed full of delicious mix-ins like grated carrots, juicy peaches, crumbly goat cheese and so much more, these 50 unique salad recipes make the perfect side for all your grilled mains this summer. Keep reading to find your favorite one or go ahead and make a new combo with every BBQ — either way you'll be screaming for the salad bowl!

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1. Spicy Carrot Salad: Microwave grated carrots and minced garlic in 1/4 cup water until crisp-tender. Drain toss with lemon juice, olive oil, salt, red pepper flakes and parsley.

2. Asian Apple Slaw: Mix rice vinegar and lime juice with salt, sugar and fish sauce. Toss with julienned jicama and apple, chopped scallions and mint.

04_SA_FN_OpenerSpreadV2-025CompCrop.tif

3. Tomato-Peach Salad: Toss tomato and peach wedges with red onion slices. Drizzle with cider vinegar and olive oil season with sugar, salt and pepper.

4. Creole Green Beans: Combine blanched thin green beans and red onion slices. Toss with Creole mustard, red wine vinegar, olive oil, salt and pepper.

5. Herb Salad: Whisk 1 part lemon juice with 3 parts olive oil, and salt and pepper. Toss with dill, basil, chives, tarragon and lettuce.

06_SA_FN_CaesarSilo-011.tif

6. Squash and Orzo Salad: Sauté zucchini, yellow squash and scallions in olive oil until tender. Toss with cooked orzo, parsley, dill, goat cheese, salt and pepper.

7. Champagne Greens: Whisk 1 part champagne vinegar with 3 parts olive oil, and salt and pepper. Toss with Boston lettuce.

8. Watercress-Fruit Salad: Toss peach wedges and watermelon cubes with watercress. Drizzle with olive oil and lemon juice season with salt and pepper.

9. Caesar Salad: Purée minced garlic and anchovies, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and 1 egg yolk with machine running, slowly add 1/4 cup olive oil. Toss with romaine top with Parmesan and croutons.

10. Hearty Tuna Salad: Mix cannellini beans, capers, pickled mushrooms, celery and olives stir in mustard, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Toss with cherry tomatoes and oil-packed tuna.

11. Southwestern Cobb: Purée equal parts mayo and buttermilk with hot sauce, cilantro, scallion, orange zest, garlic and salt. Drizzle over romaine, diced avocado and jicama, orange segments and crumbly sharp cheese.

12. Tomatoes with Mint: Sprinkle heirloom tomato chunks with salt, pepper and sliced shallots set aside 5 minutes. Top with fresh mint drizzle with olive oil and white wine vinegar.

13. Chickpea Tapas: Mix chickpeas, capers and green olives with chopped chorizo, celery, red onion, parsley and cilantro. Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper top with manchego.

14. Pasta Caprese: Mix chilled cooked fusilli, diced mozzarella, chopped tomatoes, basil, toasted pine nuts and minced garlic season with salt and pepper.

15. Chicken-Mango Salad: Whisk 1 tablespoon each lemon juice and honey, some grated ginger and 1/4 cup olive oil toss with shredded grilled chicken, mesclun greens and diced mango.

16. Oranges with Mozzarella: Stack mozzarella and orange slices with basil. Drizzle with olive oil season with salt and pepper.

17. Dilled Egg Salad: Mix mayo, dijon mustard, dill, and salt and pepper. Stir in coarsely chopped hard-boiled eggs and diced dill pickles.

18. Cantaloupe Carpaccio: Slice cantaloupe extra-thin (a mandoline works best). Drizzle with olive oil and lemon juice top with pepper and ricotta.

19. Three-Bean Salad: Boil 1/3 cup cider vinegar, 1/4 cup each sugar and vegetable oil, and salt. Pour over blanched green and wax beans, kidney beans and red onion slices marinate 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper top with parsley.

20. Greek Cucumber Salad: Mix red onion slices, chopped cucumber, kalamata olive halves, dill and feta. Dress with olive oil and lemon juice season with salt and pepper.


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