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Frontier Airlines Lets You Choose In-Flight Beers

Frontier Airlines Lets You Choose In-Flight Beers

Cast your vote for the next Colorado-made beer to be served on flights

Cast your vote for the next Colorado-made beer to be served on flights.

Flying Frontier this summer? Then get yourself to the airline's Facebook page to vote for your next in-flight beer.

Ending tomorrow, Frontier has been polling its Facebook users to determine which beer goes on the menu. The four beers listed all come from Colorado breweries: Oskar Blues' Dale's Pale Ale, Upslope Pale Ale, Colorado Native Lager, and Crabtree Oatmeal Stout. (It's not suprising that the choices all hail from the Mile High City, where the airline is based.)

The beers will be on flights starting June 1, just in time for summer travels. It appears Colorado favorite Dale's Pale Ale is in the lead, so we hope you like your beers hoppy.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Your Guide to the Airlines' In-Flight Covid Safety Policies

With no federal regulations to unify their responses, the major U.S. airlines have to figure out how to deal with Covid-19 in their own ways.

All of them have instituted new full-cabin cleaning procedures, but after that, protective measures vary.

Let's start with what the big North American carriers have in common. One is face masks. For flying purposes, a mask can be any secured cloth such a scarf or bandana, as long as it covers your nose and mouth (there are exceptions for small children). Masks with exhaust valves are generally forbidden. Plastic face shields may be worn in addition to masks, but not in place of them. Children under 2 are exempt, but if your child is 3 or older and refuses to wear a mask, you may not be able to fly. For all airlines, employees and crew members will be masked. But there are subtle differences in how masks are enforced or supplied, so each airline's policy is explained below.

Be aware that although all airlines claim wearing masks is part of their official policies, not all of them are actually enforcing the use of masks. The safety gap has become so severe that two U.S. senators have begged the Trump Administration to standardize rules for the health of all passengers.

In cases when seat assignments are blocked for social distancing purposes, customers can usually ask the airline to unblock those seats so parties can sit together. Magazines and menus have been removed from seatback pockets.

Most airlines have closed their lounges and are encouraging customers to use virtual check-in and ticketing. Passengers will be asked to check in their luggage at kiosks and scan their own mobile boarding passes at the gate, if possible, but assistance will be provided to customers who require it.

Most airlines are not allowing checked pets but will allow service animals and carry-on pets as long as they meet requirements. Procedures for unaccompanied minors remain unchanged.

Here's what the airlines say they're doing. We'll keep this list of safety measures updated as procedures develop.


Watch the video: A FRONTIER AIRLINES Review - including Stretch seats! (November 2021).