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Urban Agriculture Keeps Pace with Population Growth in India

Urban Agriculture Keeps Pace with Population Growth in India

Like the rest of the world, India’s urban populations are growing. In order to make that growth more sustainable, cities such as Nanded are embracing the change by incorporating urban agriculture into their city planning. These farming zones improve food security for an increasing population of urban poor.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.


The New Urban Farmers

Innovators in Austin are helping this booming city to grow more food—and working on ways to feed those who don’t have enough.

The city where cowboys and hippies have long come together over breakfast tacos is breeding a new kind of food pioneer.

Michael Hanan and Lloyd Minick, friends since their days in college just outside Austin, Texas, saw their ideal place in the world as social entrepreneurs. They tossed around grand ideas. One of those was farming.

“Agriculture has perhaps the greatest impact on the environment of any industry or human activity,” says Hanan, 29, a seventh-generation Texan.

They plunged into sustainable methods of growing and settled on aquaponics, a system of cultivating aquatic and terrestrial crops at the same time, cycling water and nutrients between them. “We saw a huge opportunity to innovate,” he says, “and make a small dent in that giant impact.”

Today that big idea takes the form of Agua Dulce, their expanding aquaponics operation in southeast Austin.

If they succeed, their plot will feed the neighborhood, the city, the state. They’ll sell produce from a farmstand by the road, to restaurants around town, and beyond—a Texas-based grocery-store chain has already committed to buying their greens to feed demand for local organic salad.

Hanan and Minick join a growing number of entrepreneurs in urban agriculture nationwide. They’re part of a much larger revolution to re-engineer our food supply through advances in technology from farm to fork—beginning with production in fields, greenhouses, and labs, to new approaches in managing food waste, packaging, labeling, and in distribution.

Back in Austin, they belong to a varied cast channeling both the city’s creative energy and the sustainable movement into efforts to produce more food in and around the city—and to feed its citizens nutritiously and affordably.

Public officials, nonprofit visionaries, investors, and a host of farmers, chefs, and eaters are making it happen—all while attempting to keep pace with a booming population and tackle gritty, big-city challenges.

Ten years ago The Omnivore’s Dilemma sparked the average American’s interest in food sourcing, and “locavore” entered the lexicon. Organic food continued to gain favor. As the hometown of Whole Foods, Austin was already firmly planted in that movement. When a staff of 19 opened the store in 1980, it was one of the country’s first natural food stores—and arguably the seed of its rich, inventive food scene.

Around the same time, Michael Dell would cement Austin’s reputation for innovation after launching a computer company in his dorm room. High-tech companies soon went from idea to IPO in and around its “Silicon Hills.” People poured in to join the sector, bringing money and ideas—and spurring the city’s meteoric rise.

Austin has been the fastest growing U.S. metro region for five years running, with more than a hundred people moving in each day. But not all have benefitted from the city’s robust economy. Real estate has skyrocketed, pricing out many longtime residents, while sprawl has gobbled up agricultural land, each with a ripple effect on food and a focus of those working on solutions.