New recipes

Journalist Brews Unemployed Reporter Porter

Journalist Brews Unemployed Reporter Porter

Official beer of print journalists is dark and bitter

Print journalists face a pretty bleak market these days. But when most people would be reaching for a beer, one guy decided to make his own. According to CT.com, former Hartford Advocate writer Jon Campbell got into home brewing and came up with new Unemployed Reporter Porter, the beer for print journalists.

Unemployed Reporter bills itself as "the first beer brewed by print journalists, for print journalists." As one would expect from a beer brewed by a writer, the label copy is worth the price of entry.

"Porter style beers were first popularized in the nineteenth century by merchant sailors and manual dock laborers," it reads. "Unemployed Reporter is crafted in the same tradition, honoring a profession likewise doomed to decline and irrelevance."

The porter has flavors of chocolate and roasted barley malts "as dark and bitter as the future of American journalism." It bills itself as being an exceptionally delicious breakfast that's smooth enough to drink all day long. The alcohol content is high, of course, at 6.2 percent alcohol by volume.

The comically bleak label copy even makes its way into the government warnings on the bottle. "Drinking alcoholic beverages impairs your ability to drive a car, but it's not like you have to wake up and drive to work tomorrow so f*** it."


Montclair Brewery Uses Love Of Beer As Platform For Change

A microbrewery in Montclair is continuing its annual tradition of honoring Black History Month with a series of signature beers. (Photos: Montclair Brewery)

(Photos: Montclair Brewery)

(Photos: Montclair Brewery)

MONTCLAIR, NJ — A microbrewery in Montclair is continuing its annual tradition of honoring Black History Month with a series of signature beers.

For the third year in a row, the Montclair Brewery will be releasing several new and returning craft beer styles at their tap room at 101 Walnut Street. The Black History Month beers will also be available at some of the brewery's distribution partners.

"Brewing runs deep in my West African culture, and it means so much to me that I'm able to share the history and connection that Black people have with beer, since this is not usually represented in America," said lead brewer, Leo Sawadogo, who co-owns the brewery with his wife, Denise Ford Sawadogo.

"It is so important for us to use our brewery as a platform to educate others about Black History and we love to incorporate ingredients from our Caribbean and African cultures into our brews," said Ford Sawadogo, who serves as the brewery's general manager and manages its business operations.

"While we try and pay tribute to our cultures year-round, Black History Month really gives us the opportunity to recognize and honor the sacrifices and neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in history," Ford Sawadogo added.

The lineup of new craft brews, all of which are connected to the African diaspora, include tasty libations such as:

  • Noble Like It is Porter – A collaboration with the Harlem Brewing Company which honors Gil Noble, a renowned African-American journalist, professor, pianist, news reporter, anchor, producer and host of WABC "Like it Is," a weekly television program that focused on issues relevant to the African American community. This beer is in collaboration with the Harlem Brewing Company, brewed with Jamaican pimento seeds (allspice) and expected to be released on draught early February in their taproom and at select New Jersey distribution partners mid-month in 16 oz. cans.
  • Boseman Wild Ale - A wild ale brewed with juniper berries and named to honor the actor Chadwick Boseman, best known for his starring role in the movie, "Black Panther." Being a wild ale, it's expected to have an earthy, sour and funky aroma and flavor. The Boseman Wild Ale will be released towards the middle of February and will be available on draught and for growler fills and 16 oz. cans.
  • Black is Beautiful Stout with Baobab and Peanut Butter - A new twist on the brewery's version of the "Black is Beautiful" global collaboration recipe. Peanut butter was selected as a homage to George Washington Carver, the African American agricultural scientist and inventor, often referred to as the "peanut man" for developing more than 300 products from peanuts. The "Black is Beautiful Stout with Baobab and Peanut Butter" is currently available on draft for on-premise consumption and in 12 oz. growler cans for to-go orders.

Along with these new additions, the brewery will be highlighting some of its existing beers that also pay tribute to Black history and the owners' Caribbean and African cultures. They include:

The Montclair Brewery opened its doors in 2018 after launching a crowdfunding campaign. Since then, it's been supporting social justice efforts in other ways, including donating proceeds from the "Black is Beautiful" beer, a collaboration spearheaded by Weathered Souls Brewing to help bring awareness to and raise funds to help protect those impacted by racial injustices.

A portion of the proceeds were donated to two local organizations, DIFFvelopment and IMANI.

The Montclair Brewery has previously worked with DIFFvelopment, and it led to an inspiring experience.

"We have had two of their students work with the brewery within the past two years," Ford Sawadogo said. "It is amazing to have had the chance to experience first-hand the impact that they have on college students that are often marginalized and we are honored to be able to give back to them."

"Although the past year has been extremely challenging due to parts of our business being negatively affected by COVID-19 restrictions, we strongly believe in this mission to help level the playing field for people of color and to help African Americans who are disproportionately abused by a broken and biased justice system," Ford Sawadogo added.


Mets fire GM after he sent explicit texts to female reporter

NEW YORK (AP) — Jared Porter went from rising star to unemployed — literally overnight.

Just more than a month after joining the New York Mets as general manager, Porter was fired Tuesday for sending sexually explicit, uninvited text messages and images to a female reporter in 2016 when he was working for the Chicago Cubs in their front office.

ESPN reported late Monday that Porter sent dozens of unanswered texts to the woman, including a picture of “an erect, naked penis.” ESPN said it obtained a copy of the text history, and many of the messages and photos he sent were displayed in the report online.

About nine hours later, new Mets owner Steve Cohen posted on Twitter that Porter had been fired.

“We have terminated Jared Porter this morning,” Cohen wrote Tuesday. “In my initial press conference I spoke about the importance of integrity and I meant it. There should be zero tolerance for this type of behavior.”

Approximately 30 minutes after that, the Mets released a statement from team president Sandy Alderson saying the move was effective immediately.

“Jared’s actions, as reflected by events disclosed last night, failed to meet the Mets’ standards for professionalism and personal conduct,” Alderson said.

New York hired the 41-year-old Porter last month. He agreed to a four-year contract after spending the past four seasons with the Arizona Diamondbacks as senior vice president and assistant general manager.

It was not immediately clear if the Mets planned to replace Porter with a new GM. Porter reported to Alderson, who is running baseball operations.

The woman was not identified in the report. ESPN said she recently chose to come forward only on condition of anonymity because she is afraid of backlash in her home country.

In a statement Monday night addressing the report, Alderson said the Mets would “follow up” as they reviewed “the facts regarding this serious issue.”

“I have spoken directly with Jared Porter regarding events that took place in 2016 of which we were made aware tonight for the first time. Jared has acknowledged to me his serious error in judgment, has taken responsibility for his conduct, has expressed remorse, and has previously apologized for his actions,” Alderson said in that statement.

“The Mets take these matters seriously, expect professional and ethical behavior from all of our employees, and certainly do not condone the conduct described in (the ESPN) story.”

ESPN said the woman was a foreign correspondent who had moved to the United States to cover Major League Baseball. She met Porter in a Yankee Stadium elevator in June 2016, and she said they spoke briefly about international baseball and exchanged business cards. She told ESPN that was the only time they ever spoke.

After text exchanges that began casually, Porter started complimenting her looks, inviting her to meet him in different cities and asking why she was ignoring him, ESPN said.

After he sent her a lewd picture, the woman ignored more than 60 messages from Porter before he sent the most vulgar photo, according to ESPN. The woman told ESPN she intentionally tried to avoid him at a couple of big league ballparks and the texts from Porter ultimately contributed to her decision to leave journalism and return to her home country.

Porter texted apologies to the woman in 2016 after she saw the naked picture and wrote to him that his messages were “extremely inappropriate, very offensive, and getting out of line,” ESPN reported.

ESPN said it contacted Porter on Monday evening, and he acknowledged texting with the woman. At first, he said he hadn’t sent any pictures of himself, but when informed the exchanges show that he sent selfies and other pictures, he said “the more explicit ones are not of me. Those are like, kinda like joke-stock images,” ESPN reported.

After asking whether the outlet intended to run a story, Porter requested more time before later declining further comment, ESPN said.

It’s another embarrassing development for the Mets, who have energized fans by acquiring star shortstop Francisco Lindor and several other notable players since Cohen purchased the club from the Wilpon and Katz families for $2.42 billion in early November.

Last offseason, under previous GM Brodie Van Wagenen, the Mets hired former slugger Carlos Beltrán as manager only to cut ties with him 2 1/2 months later when he was implicated in MLB’s investigation of illegal sign stealing by Houston while Beltrán was an Astros player in 2017.

Beltrán was let go by the Mets — without managing a single game — just more than a year ago on Jan. 16, 2020, following a tenure that lasted 77 days. Porter was fired less than 40 days after being introduced as GM of the Mets, which he called “a dream job.”

Before his Diamondbacks tenure, Porter worked under Theo Epstein with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago Cubs, winning three World Series championships in Boston’s front office and another with the Cubs. ESPN said Porter was the Cubs’ director of professional scouting when he sent the messages to the woman.

Not fully familiar with the English language and American culture, the woman received help from an interpreter in constructing a message to Porter asking him to “please stop sending offensive photos” or messages. He apologized by text multiple times and said he would stop, ESPN reported.

ESPN said it interviewed three other people who said they saw or were told about the texts at the time.

The woman eventually informed her bosses and was connected in 2016 with a lawyer and a Cubs employee from her home country, ESPN reported. She didn’t want to identify the employee publicly because she feared retribution, according to ESPN.

She said the Cubs employee told her Porter wanted to apologize in person, but she didn’t want to see him. She said the employee pressed her repeatedly on whether she planned to file a lawsuit against Porter and months later got angry when she saw the employee at spring training in 2017 and said she was still considering it, ESPN reported.

ESPN said the employee confirmed Monday that he discussed the situation with Porter and the woman but denied getting angry. The woman did not pursue legal action and told ESPN she doesn’t plan to.

“This story came to our attention tonight and we are not aware of this incident ever being reported to the organization,” the Cubs said in a statement given to ESPN late Monday.

“Had we been notified, we would have taken swift action as the alleged behavior is in violation of our code of conduct,” the club said. “While these two individuals are no longer with the organization, we take issues of sexual harassment seriously and plan to investigate the matter.”

Cohen brought back Alderson, the Mets’ general manager from 2010-18, as team president and he immediately fired Van Wagenen and several of his top front-office aides.

The team initially sought to hire a president of baseball operations but changed course when it was unable to attain permission to interview several candidates around the majors and at least one did not want to move to New York.

Instead, the 73-year-old Alderson has taken over baseball operations, and the idea was for Porter to potentially grow into that role.

“I think what we’ve talked about the most is just a cultural shift, for one,” Porter said when introduced as GM last month. “Adding good people to the organization. Improving on the organizational culture.”


Ascension Brewing Company Brews Up Craft Beer Niche

(Nathan Mueller, Jan. 30, 2016)

Novi, MI – Fifteen Mile Porter. Scotty Knows. H.O.M.E.S. 2.0. The Phoenix. 800- Pound Gorilla.

Adam Czap is either a director of an eclectic mix of Hollywood movies, or running a brand new microbrewery.

Fortunately, for craft beer lovers, it’s the latter.

Ascension Brewing Company opened in August with the idea of bringing friends and family together over a pint in a comfortable, relaxing atmosphere.

“I really like the social aspect of it,” said Czap, a Novi resident. “What we’ve created at Ascension is a really relaxed environment where people just enjoy being with each other. That’s one of the things I love about this place.”

Located at 42000 Grand River Avenue, just west of Meadowbrook Road, Ascension offers about a dozen taps of freshly brewed IPAs, ales, stouts and everything in between. Czap, who started brewing in his garage in 2008, said Ascension prides itself on its ability to meet its customers’ ever changing beer palate.

“We’re always looking for new ideas and testing new recipes,” he said. “That’s one of the great things about having a smaller system like we do. We’re very mobile, and without great cost to the brewery, we can try new things. If it doesn’t work out, it doesn’t work out, but we’ve had fairly good success with that so far.”

Brandon Sabo is Ascension’s master brewer. It’s his job to do everything from purchasing ingredients to cleaning the equipment when he is finished with another custom batch. “A lot of the recipes are collaboration,” said Sabo. “Adam helps a lot. Some are his individual recipes and some are my own original recipes.”

The journey from home brewer to microbrew owner actually predates 2008. Czap, 32, grew up in Brown City, a small farming town of about 1,300 people in Michigan’s Thumb. Both of his parents were teachers and Adam intended to follow in their footsteps by earning a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Michigan.

After starting to teach, Czap quickly realized the profession wasn’t for him. He went back to school for dentistry, but ended up starting a photography business. That side job quickly turned into a full-time gig and he and his wife still run Czap Studios, a wedding and portrait boutique, also in Novi.

The home brewing bug bit him a few years into his photography career. “I think it happened for me the same way it happens to a lot of guys that get into home brewing thinking they can have some fun with it, and get their beer for a little bit cheaper. But that’s kind of a joke because that rabbit hole is endless for buying new parts,” he said.

$100 investment allowed him to create his first batch. After a few trials and errors, Czap started producing enough beer to keep 30-40 gallons on tap at home.

While he thoroughly enjoyed the process of brewing, it was really the joy of sharing his creations that led to Ascension. “They liked my beer and said, ‘you could sell this.’ Me being an idiot, I agreed with them.”

Czap’s previous experience with his photography business helped him make the transition from home brewer to microbrewer. He started formulating a business plan a few years ago, and by December 2014 was building Ascension – which gets its name from his faith – from the ground up.

Besides his sociability, Czap said there was a sound reason for starting the business. “I was tired of going to every other city to go to a microbrewery,” he explained. “I thought it was something Novi really needed since Local Color had been gone for so many years.”

Indications are that Czap was right. Ascension is busiest Thursday through Saturday, but has a steady flow of patrons most nights.

And it’s not just good beer bringing them in. Ascension features a full line of appetizers, sandwiches, salads and soups. “We emphasize fresh, healthy food,” said Czap. “We do not use a deep fryer or a microwave.”

Still, at its core, Ascension is a brewing company. Long before the first patron walks in, Sabo is hard at work. On average, he brews three to four 150-gallon batches per week. Every batch, he says, takes 12- 16 hours to produce. That means everything from converting grains into fermentable sugar in Ascension’s mash tun, to kettle boiling and adding the proper amount of yeast.

Sabo buys all ingredients locally, and uses water from the Detroit River. “We have some of the best brewing water in the world,” he says. “The only thing we do is treat it to get the fluoride and chlorine out. We’re very lucky to be in Michigan, where our water is such high quality.”

Ascension’s style of beers runs the gambit as does the alcohol content, from light to the potent 800- Pound Gorilla. Czap said that variety is by design. Whatever he and Sabo are producing on a given day, quality is goal number one. “I like big beers,” he added. “Really big, flavorful products across the board. I’m definitely not just a hops person.”

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White House releases its beer recipe

(CBS News) Responding to a petition boasting 12,000+ signatures and Freedom of Information Act requests, the Obama administration on Saturday released some previously-undisclosed, in-demand information: The White House beer recipe.

In a pun-laden blog post on the White House website, White House assistant chef and senior policy advisor for healthy food initiatives Sam Kass laid out instructions for brewing the "White House Honey Ale," and the "White House Honey Porter," apparently "the first alcohol brewed or distilled on the White House grounds."

"Inspired by home brewers from across the country, last year President Obama bought a home brewing kit for the kitchen," Kass wrote in the post. "After the few first drafts we landed on some great recipes that came from a local brew shop. We received some tips from a couple of home brewers who work in the White House who helped us amend it and make it our own.

"To be honest, we were surprised that the beer turned out so well since none of us had brewed beer before," Kass wrote.

The White House also released a behind-the-scenes video explaining the White House brewing process. (You can watch that video by clicking on the player, above left).

Last month, the president revealed that not only does the White House brew its own beer - it also keeps a stock of it on the campaign bus.

Trending News

Since then, requests for the recipe have been made via the White House petition site, "We the people," through FOIA requests, and in a Reddit question-and-answer session.

"It will be out soon! I can tell from firsthand experience, it is tasty," the president said, when asked about the recipe on Reddit.

Today, as the president campaigned in Iowa, the administration made good on the promise.

See the official recipes, below:

whitehouse.gov whitehouse.gov


Craft Beer's 10 Best Seasonal Porters and Stouts

PORTLAND, Ore. (TheStreet) -- You don&apost need to spice up a beer or put Santa Claus and wreaths on the label to make a great winter beer. Sometimes you just need to darken it up and give it enough kick to warm you.

Though it&aposs a great time to sip the last of the fall&aposs pumpkin ales and sample the first of the holiday season&aposs winter warmers, this is also stout season. Though the folks at

Diageo Guinness

seem more than happy to let mainstream American beer drinkers believe St. Patrick&aposs Day ushers in stout season here in the U.S., American craft brewers use this time of year to introduce their malty holiday porters, creamy sweet stouts and high-octane limited release imperial stouts.

But how do you tell a porter from a stout? Should it even matter to holiday beer drinkers looking for a tall glass of something warm, dark and lovely? Not really. Blame Arthur Guinness for the confusion, as his recipe for Extra Superior Porter eventually became Guinness Stout. True porters didn&apost return until the initial U.S. craft beer boom of the late 1980s and early 1990s, and to this day judges at beer competitions insist stouts are darker, use roasted barley and use less water than porters.

It gets a bit esoteric after that, and even brewers and beers experts don&apost believe there&aposs much separating porters and stouts beyond what a brewer decides to call it. Writer Adrienne So summed it up in far greater detail for

back in March, but drinkers shouldn&apost trifle themselves with such distinctions this winter.

There are a lot better reasons to enjoy these seasonal stouts and porters than their names alone. Here are just 10 examples of stouts and porters that are a perfect fit for the cold months ahead:

Goose Island Bourbon County Coffee Stout and Cherry Rye Bourbon County

Alcohol by volume:

Practically the entire beer-loving Chicagoland area lines up for the bourbon-barrel-aged Bourbon County Stout in September, but the original 15% ABV recipe may not be the best Goose Island has to offer.

Bourbon County Coffee Stout was released in November, made with La Tortuga beans from Chicago&aposs

Intelligentsia Coffee and Tea

. That roasted coffee flavor melds with hints of vanilla and chocolate to dampen the bourbon burn just a bit. The Cherry Rye Bourbon also hit the shelves in November, adding some seasonally appropriate dark cherry tartness to the equation.

Goose Island fans keep waiting for Bourbon County Stout to water down or go year-round after

Anheuser-Busch InBev&aposs

purchase of Goose Island last year. While that day seems ever closer as Goose Island execs and brewers leave and barrel capacity grows, this year&aposs batch indicates the good times won&apost end this winter.

Dogfish Head Worldwide Stout

Alcohol by volume:

This big beast from Delaware debuted back in 1999 and has given folks near Rehoboth Beach a reason to welcome winter that doesn&apost involve shoveling loud packs of summer tourists out of town.

Once the most potent beer on the planet, Worldwide Stout drinks more like a cordial than a creamy pint of Guinness. It tastes a bit like port and has the slow burn to back that up. The folks at Dogfish Head recommend keeping it in the cellar for a season or so to take the heat off and give it a profile more akin to a roasty stout, but even then it&aposs going to be a bit stronger than most six-packs party guests will stick in the fridge.

Alcohol by volume:

In any other world there&aposd be lines around the block at New York liquor stores and fanboys wearing wristbands every time Southern Tier released one of the imperial stouts in its Blackwater Series. The Lakewood, N.Y., brewer makes seasonal stouts that taste like coffee, mocha and creme brulee, but perhaps its tastiest treat of all is this chocolate-infused winter offering that appears each November.

Debuting just five years ago and always available in high supply, Chokolat takes two strains of hops and four kinds of malts and ferments them with bittersweet Belgian chocolate. It finishes with a deep chocolate flavor and just a hint of dark cherry and serves as the perfect dessert for holiday dinners where you just can&apost stomach another cookie or slice of pie.

Alcohol by volume:

Founders stouts are kind of a big deal. The Grand Rapids, Mich., brewery had to scold merchants last year for gouging prices on its Canadian Breakfast Stout. Its KBS bourbon stout until recently was a beer trader&aposs best friend.

Original-recipe Breakfast Stout, however, is just damned tasty. Sold in four-packs and still somewhat of a tough find outside of Michigan, Breakfast Stout is smoother, creamier and more pleasant than its alcohol content suggests. The combination of flaked oats, bitter and imported chocolates and Sumatra and Kona coffee mellows it out and gives it a smooth, milkshake taste that just induces cravings. We found a stockpile of four-packs sitting among cases of Corona and Bud Light at a liquor store in Northern New Jersey during Christmas vacation last year and still think local dismissal of it was one of the best presents we got all year.

It comes out in September and reportedly stays around until February, but is known to deplete well before then. Black Friday shopping rules apply: If you see it, grab it.

Alcohol by volume:

Know why people who love craft beer don&apost make jokes about beer in cans anymore? This brewery and this beer specifically have a lot to do with it.

When Oskar Blues started canning in the early 2000s, it did so as a sales gimmick to draw folks to its brewery and brewpub in Lyons, Colo. Since then, it&aposs helped convince the craft beer world that lined cans are a great way to block out the light and keep beer fresh while leaving behind none of the metallic flavor of their trashier aluminum forebears.

It&aposs also a big boomer compared with its Colorado neighbors in the silver, mountain-laden cans. The 10.5% alcohol content is right in the name and masks a whole lot of hop bitterness behind its roasted dark malt and chocolate-covered caramel flavor. Bitterness in mouth-puckering brews such as India pale ale is measured in international bittering units that usually top out at 100. Ten Fidy sits at 98 IBUs.

Midnight Sun Berzerker

Alcohol by volume:

We&aposll just go ahead and get the very NSFW "berzerker" clip from Kevin Smith&aposs Clerks out of the way, as it has nothing to do with this beer but is inextricably tied to the word.

With that out of the way, we move on to Anchorage, Alaska, and one of the baddest imperial stouts in the land. This brew isn&apost masking its alcohol content but bathing it in the scent of whiskey, red wine, dark fruit and tobacco reminiscent of the smoke-filled basements that hosted holiday parties of yore. Aged in wine and whiskey barrels, Berzerker isn&apost there to candy coat your insides, but to give them a viking funeral. A crackling yule log puts of less heat than this potent warmer.

Deschutes&apos The Abyss

Alcohol by volume:

If this is a time of giving and good will, why aren&apost the folks east of the Mississippi allowed to taste this wondrous little batch of deep, dark stout from Bend, Ore.?

Maybe because it doesn&apost take itself as seriously as the beer nerd stouts that sit in cellars and are alluded to on message boards while owners troll for suckers willing to make trades. Abyss&apos bottle says age it, the brewers say you should try to drink it fresh the pragmatist says get two bottles and try it both ways.

Certainly one of the richest stouts on this list, The Abyss is as dark as its name implies and skips over the niceties of roasted grain and chocolate notes for heavier molasses and licorice flavors. Released in mid-November, it&aposs built for the cold gray days ahead while still warm enough to have its own

recipe. Our apologies to folks back East, who&aposd likely love a bottle once the snow hits.

Surly Darkness

Alcohol by volume:

This Minnesota brewery loves itself a 16-ounce tallboy can and an easy drinkin&apos beer.

That Darkness comes in a wine-style bottle capped with a red wax seal and emblazoned with a vampire face should be a sign that it&aposs not messing around. It&aposs tough to consider this a winter holiday beer, as the October release date and goth labeling clearly vie for Halloween space amid the pumpkin ales, but a potent stout laden with hints of chocolate, cherries, raisins, coffee and toffee fits right in at the Christmas table.

Just be prepared for some holiday bitterness that doesn&apost stem from getting socks instead of a tablet. Surly says it adds "a touch of hops" to Darkness, but its 85 IBUs are more than beer lovers will find in some brews that deign to call themselves IPAs.

Great Divide Espresso Oak Aged Original Stout

Alcohol by volume:

What makes a "breakfast stout," you ask?

Well, the first thing you&aposll want to add is a bit of coffee. Denver-based Great Divide tweaks its Yeti imperial stout this way by infusing it with a whole lot of Denver&aposs own Pablo&aposs espresso. A little vanilla or milky flavor always helps, and Yeti&aposs strong undercurrent of vanilla from its oak-barrel aging certainly does the trick.

Finally, you&aposll want to crank up the volume a bit as a wakeup call. All of those sugars help give this coffee-powered Yeti some extra kick, while the coffee and vanilla keep the burn to a minimum. Can you drink it for breakfast? Some people have a thing about not drinking a beer before noon, but last we checked it wasn&apost illegal.

Bells Expedition Stout

Alcohol by volume:

Why did we put another Michigan brewery in here? That&aposs simple: Michigan knows cold, Michigan knows long winter months and lake-effect snow, Michigan knows hard times. As a result of all of that, its large craft beer community knows how to make a stout that will get folks through.

From October until about mid-March, it&aposs Expedition Stout season. Bell&aposs created this malty, fruity, chocolate-laden monster strictly for the winter months, even if it won&apost be at its best until a winter from now. It&aposs one of the only beers of its kind brewed for the express purpose of aging, yet is still available on tap for much of the season for those who can&apost wait.

How long you hold off depends on what kind of a stout drinker you are. If you like a powerful, bitter imperial that lets you in on its secret from the first sip, drink Expedition Stout in its early months. If you enjoy a more subtle, malty stout, let this one sit around a while.


Mets fire GM after he sent explicit texts to female reporter

NEW YORK (AP) — Jared Porter went from rising star to unemployed — literally overnight.

Just more than a month after joining the New York Mets as general manager, Porter was fired Tuesday for sending sexually explicit, uninvited text messages and images to a female reporter in 2016 when he was working for the Chicago Cubs in their front office.

ESPN reported late Monday that Porter sent dozens of unanswered texts to the woman, including a picture of “an erect, naked penis.” ESPN said it obtained a copy of the text history, and many of the messages and photos he sent were displayed in the report online.

About nine hours later, new Mets owner Steve Cohen posted on Twitter that Porter had been fired.

“We have terminated Jared Porter this morning,” Cohen wrote Tuesday. “In my initial press conference I spoke about the importance of integrity and I meant it. There should be zero tolerance for this type of behavior.”

Approximately 30 minutes after that, the Mets released a statement from team president Sandy Alderson saying the move was effective immediately.

“Jared’s actions, as reflected by events disclosed last night, failed to meet the Mets’ standards for professionalism and personal conduct,” Alderson said.

New York hired the 41-year-old Porter last month. He agreed to a four-year contract after spending the past four seasons with the Arizona Diamondbacks as senior vice president and assistant general manager.

It was not immediately clear if the Mets planned to replace Porter with a new GM. Porter reported to Alderson, who is running baseball operations.

The woman was not identified in the report. ESPN said she recently chose to come forward only on condition of anonymity because she is afraid of backlash in her home country.

In a statement Monday night addressing the report, Alderson said the Mets would “follow up” as they reviewed “the facts regarding this serious issue.”

“I have spoken directly with Jared Porter regarding events that took place in 2016 of which we were made aware tonight for the first time. Jared has acknowledged to me his serious error in judgment, has taken responsibility for his conduct, has expressed remorse, and has previously apologized for his actions,” Alderson said in that statement.

“The Mets take these matters seriously, expect professional and ethical behavior from all of our employees, and certainly do not condone the conduct described in (the ESPN) story.”

ESPN said the woman was a foreign correspondent who had moved to the United States to cover Major League Baseball. She met Porter in a Yankee Stadium elevator in June 2016, and she said they spoke briefly about international baseball and exchanged business cards. She told ESPN that was the only time they ever spoke.

After text exchanges that began casually, Porter started complimenting her looks, inviting her to meet him in different cities and asking why she was ignoring him, ESPN said.

After he sent her a lewd picture, the woman ignored more than 60 messages from Porter before he sent the most vulgar photo, according to ESPN. The woman told ESPN she intentionally tried to avoid him at a couple of big league ballparks and the texts from Porter ultimately contributed to her decision to leave journalism and return to her home country.

Porter texted apologies to the woman in 2016 after she saw the naked picture and wrote to him that his messages were “extremely inappropriate, very offensive, and getting out of line,” ESPN reported.

ESPN said it contacted Porter on Monday evening, and he acknowledged texting with the woman. At first, he said he hadn’t sent any pictures of himself, but when informed the exchanges show that he sent selfies and other pictures, he said “the more explicit ones are not of me. Those are like, kinda like joke-stock images,” ESPN reported.

After asking whether the outlet intended to run a story, Porter requested more time before later declining further comment, ESPN said.

It’s another embarrassing development for the Mets, who have energized fans by acquiring star shortstop Francisco Lindor and several other notable players since Cohen purchased the club from the Wilpon and Katz families for $2.42 billion in early November.

Last offseason, under previous GM Brodie Van Wagenen, the Mets hired former slugger Carlos Beltrán as manager only to cut ties with him 2 1/2 months later when he was implicated in MLB’s investigation of illegal sign stealing by Houston while Beltrán was an Astros player in 2017.

Beltrán was let go by the Mets — without managing a single game — just more than a year ago on Jan. 16, 2020, following a tenure that lasted 77 days. Porter was fired less than 40 days after being introduced as GM of the Mets, which he called “a dream job.”

Before his Diamondbacks tenure, Porter worked under Theo Epstein with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago Cubs, winning three World Series championships in Boston’s front office and another with the Cubs. ESPN said Porter was the Cubs’ director of professional scouting when he sent the messages to the woman.

Not fully familiar with the English language and American culture, the woman received help from an interpreter in constructing a message to Porter asking him to “please stop sending offensive photos” or messages. He apologized by text multiple times and said he would stop, ESPN reported.

ESPN said it interviewed three other people who said they saw or were told about the texts at the time.

The woman eventually informed her bosses and was connected in 2016 with a lawyer and a Cubs employee from her home country, ESPN reported. She didn’t want to identify the employee publicly because she feared retribution, according to ESPN.

She said the Cubs employee told her Porter wanted to apologize in person, but she didn’t want to see him. She said the employee pressed her repeatedly on whether she planned to file a lawsuit against Porter and months later got angry when she saw the employee at spring training in 2017 and said she was still considering it, ESPN reported.

ESPN said the employee confirmed Monday that he discussed the situation with Porter and the woman but denied getting angry. The woman did not pursue legal action and told ESPN she doesn’t plan to.

“This story came to our attention tonight and we are not aware of this incident ever being reported to the organization,” the Cubs said in a statement given to ESPN late Monday.

“Had we been notified, we would have taken swift action as the alleged behavior is in violation of our code of conduct,” the club said. “While these two individuals are no longer with the organization, we take issues of sexual harassment seriously and plan to investigate the matter.”

Cohen brought back Alderson, the Mets’ general manager from 2010-18, as team president and he immediately fired Van Wagenen and several of his top front-office aides.

The team initially sought to hire a president of baseball operations but changed course when it was unable to attain permission to interview several candidates around the majors and at least one did not want to move to New York.

Instead, the 73-year-old Alderson has taken over baseball operations, and the idea was for Porter to potentially grow into that role.

“I think what we’ve talked about the most is just a cultural shift, for one,” Porter said when introduced as GM last month. “Adding good people to the organization. Improving on the organizational culture.”


Journalist Brews Unemployed Reporter Porter - Recipes

THIS FOURTH of July, celebrate the holiday with the beer style that defines America's independence from the British: Porter.

Yes, I know it's a bit dark for warm weather. Don't worry. Its alcohol is fairly low (about 5-6 percent) and its roasted flavors pair wonderfully with hamburgers or grilled chicken.

But there's an even bigger reason to enjoy porter this weekend, namely patriotism.

"To say it is equal to any of London, the usual standard for excellence, would undervalue it, because as it regards either wholesome qualities or palatableness, it is much superior . . . "

That's physician, scientific thinker and author James Mease, writing 199 years ago on the eve of the War of 1812. For the early part of its history, American porter was all about patriotism, not to mention the young nation's distaste for all things English.

Porter was a wholly British invention, an aged, slightly sour ale that was brewed dark and strong, earning its name because of its popularity among carriage porters.

Its export to the Colonies helped define the superiority of our overlords. The professionally trained English brewed with the finest roasted malts the primitive rabble of the Colonies substituted with molasses and licorice.

Not surprisingly, Colonial boycotts of British goods only occasionally targeted those luscious shipments of porter. You can imagine the patriot Samuel Adams eyeing wooden casks of fine English ale loaded aboard the ships in Boston Harbor and suggesting, "Hey, let's dump the tea into the harbor instead."

Kicking redcoat butt changed things. Complaining shortly after the Revolution that "we have already been too long subject to British prejudices," George Washington launched a "Buy American" campaign, declaring, "I use no porter or cheese in my family, but such as is made in America both these articles may now be purchased of an excellent quality."

His favorite: the Philadelphia porter made by Robert Hare, a British-trained brewer who loathed the English.

By most accounts, it wasn't just patriotism that gave American porter its reputation for excellence. There are reports of shipments leaving Philadelphia and making it to Calcutta, India, without spoilage. Meanwhile, writes Mease, repressive English duties on malt and hops forced Britain's brewers to dumb down their famous product with additions of aloe, tobacco, quassia root and sulfates.

By the early 20th century, with Burton pale ale on the rise, porter was all but extinct in the United Kingdom.

In America, the style survived largely because German immigrant brewers - whose crisp, pale lagers would eventually dominate - adapted their early recipes to produce a dark porter made with lager yeast. The hybrid variety is still alive in the form of Yuengling Porter, black, roasty and mildly hopped, but light-bodied like a lager.

In the early '70s, San Francisco's Anchor Brewing returned us to the early porter that quenched the thirst of our young nation. Brown, smooth and robust, it's a sublime celebration of darkened malts and fresh hops.

Back in Philadelphia, where it all began, Yards brews George Washington Tavern Porter just blocks from Robert Hare's old brewery. It balances dark malts and molasses with an aggressive but compatible portion of Willamette and East Kent Goldings hops in a recipe taken from George Washington's papers.

Today, dozens of American craft brewers view porter as the perfect palette for more adventuresome flavors. Vanilla, coffee, chocolate and smoked malts often find their way into the barrel, with results ranging from curious to astounding.

Try one of these this Fourth of July: Great Lakes Edmund Fitzgerald Porter, Smuttynose Robust Porter, Sierra Nevada Porter, Deschutes Black Butte Porter, Rogue Mocha Porter, Avery New World Porter, Stone Smoked Porter.


On eve of 125th birthday, S.F.'s Anchor Brewing is changing its vintage beer labels

Anchor Brewing, which turns 125 in February, has rebranded its core four beers for the first time ever.

Esther Mobley / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

The previous looks for a variety of Anchor Brewing beers, seen at the Potrero Hill brewery in 2019.

Yalonda M. James / The Chronicle 2019 Show More Show Less

Pilot brewer Dane Volek cleans a brew kettle at Anchor Public Taps.

Yalonda M. James / The Chronicle 2019 Show More Show Less

Anchor Brewing’s most famous product, steam beer, has a new look — in part to make it clear that the brewery’s name is not "Anchor Steam."

Esther Mobley / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

For the first time ever, Anchor Brewing&rsquos four main beers are getting a new look.

Some breweries change their labels all the time, but when it comes to Anchor, a rebrand carries special significance. This marks the first time that the beloved, vintage-feeling labels for the porter, California lager and Liberty Ale beers have gotten a makeover &mdash and the first time in modern history that there&rsquos been a significant change to the label for the brewery&rsquos oldest and most famous product, Anchor Steam.

&ldquoWe know it&rsquos going to be a shocking change to some people,&rdquo said Dane Volek, who runs Anchor&rsquos pilot brewing program. But, he said, coming up on the brewery&rsquos 125th birthday next month, &ldquoit seemed like a nice pivot point.&rdquo

Anchor Steam beer&rsquos new label is bright yellow with big blue lettering, a pared-down image compared with the busy, antique-looking label of the past. The goal, Volek said, was to retain a &ldquoretro-chic&rdquo look with the new packaging, but also to differentiate the name of the brewery (Anchor) from the name of the beer (steam), since that has long been a point of confusion for many consumers.

&ldquoWe still get some mail addressed to &lsquoAnchor Steam Brewery,&rsquo&rdquo Volek laughed.

The rebrand marks the first major change to Anchor&rsquos core beers since Japanese beer giant Sapporo acquired the San Francisco brewery in 2017.

Anchor Brewing’s main four beers have gotten a big makeover. From left: Anchor Steam, Liberty Ale, California Lager and Anchor Porter.

Esther Mobley / The Chronicle

These newly packaged beers will be available for to-go sales from Anchor&rsquos taproom in Potrero Hill and will roll out to retail outlets nationwide in February. This week only, the brewery is selling what it&rsquos calling &ldquoretro-priced&rdquo six-packs of Anchor Steam for just $1.25 apiece instead of the usual $9. (The brewery began taking orders Monday for pickup from the taproom Thursday through Sunday.)

The porter, Liberty Ale and California lager labels have not changed since they were introduced in 1972, 1975 and 2012 respectively, and the steam label has remained mostly unchanged since longtime owner Fritz Maytag revived the brewery in 1965. (The steam beer label did undergo minor tweaks around 2013, Volek said, but they were small enough that many drinkers likely didn&rsquot notice.)

Part of the goal of the rebrand was to distinguish the beers from each other. With the previous packaging, the labels for all of Anchor&rsquos mainstay beers all had the same color scheme. Now they&rsquore starkly different, with California Lager an electric green and Liberty Ale a deep blue. Anchor Porter&rsquos rebranded look feels the closest to its previous incarnation, with familiar-feeling cursive lettering across the bottle&rsquos round label.

The old labels on a few of Anchor Brewing’s best-known beers: Old Foghorn barleywine, Liberty Ale, Anchor Porter, Anchor Steam and Christmas Ale. After remaining unchanged for many years, some of the beers’ labels are getting a makeover.

In August, Tom Riley &mdash who started at Anchor 36 years ago, initially working on the packaging line &mdash took over as brewmaster from predecessor Scott Ungermann. In March, Anchor will add three new beers created by Volek to its permanent lineup: a tropical hazy IPA, a pilsner and a 100-calorie, gluten-reduced, mango-flavored golden ale called Little Weekend. That will be the first time since the 1970s that Anchor releases three new brews intended for year-round, indefinite production.

Volek said he&rsquos especially proud of Little Weekend, which is the sort of beer that health-conscious drinkers at the taproom have been clamoring for in recent years.

&ldquoIt&rsquos kind of going after the hard seltzer crowd, but I still wanted it to taste like beer,&rdquo he said.

The mango flavor is inspired by the success of the brewery&rsquos discontinued Mango Wheat.

Fritz Maytag of Anchor Brewing, March 28, 1978.

Gary Fong / The Chronicle 1978

The past decade has been a period of intense change at Anchor. Maytag, who elevated Anchor into what many consider to be America&rsquos first craft brewery, sold his business in 2010 to an investment group owned by two former Skyy Spirits executives. Anchor had long been known for sticking to a short roster of basic, tried and true, old-fashioned beers Maytag released only 10 styles in his 45-year tenure, becoming known for things like the antiquated-feeling Christmas Ale and Old Foghorn barleywine. After Maytag sold it, however, Anchor grew much more experimental, in large part thanks to Volek, releasing more of-the-moment brews like fruited beers and hazy IPAs.

A new design for Old Foghorn will debut at some point soon, Volek said, and it will look somewhat similar to the new look of Anchor Porter. Christmas Ale, the seasonal holiday beer whose recipe changes every year, is not expected to have a different label in 2021.


Need a Six-Pack? Hit the Basement

TIM ARTZ’S brewery is enclosed by glass walls on three sides and looks out onto a bluff of apple trees and a garden filled with beans, squash and 35 varieties of pepper. On a raw April morning, the brewery doors were open but the brewery itself was warm the gas burner below the 30-gallon brew tank was cranking at near full power.

Mr. Artz was already a good 90 minutes into his brew day the grain was milled and the hops were measured and waiting on a nearby table. It was just the moment for his wife to emerge from the house and ask if he and his guests would like a fresh mug of coffee.

Mr. Artz, 48, is just a home brewer, not a professional his main job is director of information technology at a health care firm. But with the elaborate set-up he has built and installed in his Florida room (there is a big cask for holding mash and an $1,800 fermentation tank, in addition to the 30-gallon kettle), he could easily be mistaken for much more than an amateur.

Home brewing, which was rendered illegal by Prohibition and not legalized again until 1979, is enjoying a resurgence. The American Homebrewers Association, based in Boulder, Colo., had just 11,724 members in 2006 that has since more than doubled, to 26,000. This increased interest, in turn, has fostered a mini-boom in brewing equipment, according to Gary Glass, who is the director of the association. “Home-brew supply shops reported a growth of 16 percent in gross revenue, according to 2009 numbers,” Mr. Glass said, referring to the change from the prior year. The numbers for 2010 are not yet available, he added, but he anticipates double-digit growth once again.

This increase has been aided by the rise of social clubs, books and competitions geared to home brewers, as well as by the success of microbreweries over the last two decades, which has inspired many amateur beermakers. The D.I.Y. and locavore movements have played a role, too. “There is a trend to do things more locally,” Mr. Glass said. “You don’t get any more local than doing it at home.”

Even the recession did not slow things, Mr. Glass added. “Part of the theory,” he said, “is that people have more time for hobbies when they are unemployed or underemployed.”

Image

In a way, the revival recalls America’s roots. The Pilgrims are said to have landed at Plymouth Rock rather than continue on to Virginia, because they had run out of beer and wanted a fresh supply. Many founding fathers brewed ales on their farms. (George Washington’s recipe for a porter brewed with molasses, recently recreated by a Brooklyn brewer, has been commercially produced by the Shmaltz Brewing Company.) Even the Obamas have joined in they served an ale brewed at the White House and flavored with honey from the beehives there at their Super Bowl party this year.

For many people, home brewing summons visions of beat-up equipment that is stashed in a corner of a garage, dragged out only occasionally, powered by modest propane tanks normally attached to the barbecue and yielding just a few gallons. (Professional breweries measure output by the barrel — roughly 31 gallons each.)

But as the ranks of amateur brewers grow, more of them are like the Artz family, people with high-end equipment who brew lots of beer and have a dedicated brewing space in their homes.

“When we looked at the house and walked into the room, we both knew this is where the brewery would be,” said Dot Artz, who occasionally brews with her husband but on that April day was growing crystals in the kitchen with the couple’s 8-year-old son, Ben. (A true D.I.Y. family, they also forage for mushrooms, make their own soap, keep four beehives and smoke meat on a large smoker made out of a cleaned and repurposed oil drum.) The Artz family has also made substantial outlays for their pastime. Mr. Artz rolled his eyes and grinned mischievously when asked how much he has spent on brewing over the years. “A lot,” he said. “It is definitely not a cheap hobby.”

Some home brewers who invest heavily harbor ambitions of one day opening a professional brewery (as amateurs they cannot legally sell their wares). But other big spenders have no grand business plans they equate brewing to activities like golf: a pastime that is a labor of love, exploration, trial and error, frustration and, finally, pride, when the water, malt, hops and yeast combine just right to pour a perfect pint.

For these dedicated hobbyists who are willing to spend money, said Mr. Glass, beer equipment manufacturers, like Sabco, of Toledo, Ohio, and More Beer, of Concord, Calif., are now making high-end commercial-grade products for home use.

“It is still the exception, not the rule,” said Mr. Glass, who is emphatically not one of the high-end hobbyists. He brews about six times a year, and does so on a Frankenstein system, an affectionate term used by home brewers to describe a mishmash of equipment that is not pretty, but gets the job done.

But the president of Sabco, Bob Sulier, believes the number of high-end brewers is growing. In the past, the company’s Brew Magic system — their $6,000 flagship — was sold primarily to professional brewers, he said, but now many are being bought by home brewers or home-brew groups. In 2010, the company sold about one Brew Magic system a day, he added.

"We cater to the higher end of the group, the advanced home brewers,” Mr. Sulier said. “For many, this is the next logical step. They are willing to drop a dollar."

For many, the hobby began in college. Some wanted to drink well for less money and others were inspired by “starter” products like Mr. Beer kits, plastic barrels costing about $40 that have pre-measured ingredients and simple instructions and yield about two gallons of beer.

But like many pastimes, home brewing can grow addictive — and become more expensive.

Kal Wallner, a 41-year-old electrical engineer from Ottawa, said he spent about $5,000 on an all-electric brewery (most are gas-fed) that he installed in a basement room underneath his front porch steps. His goal was ambitious: a system that, “when you walked in, people would immediately think of a real brewery.”

Currently, Mr. Wallner’s brewery is in storage waiting for a move to the family’s new home. When he moves there next month, he will have more space for his brewery and plans to install floor drains, completely tile the room and add some new equipment.

“It is a lot of work,” he said, “but worth it.”

Bryan Rabe, a 31-year-old municipal worker from Albertville, Minn., agrees. Mr. Rabe, who is married and has a year-old daughter, installed a 20-gallon system in a small basement room that once held his heating and air-conditioning system and water heater. He designed the system, just 36 inches wide, to fit into this challengingly small space much of it is automated and is run from a panel that resembles a microwave and is built into the wall.

Mr. Rabe, who tends to favor light American lagers and some German lagers, stores his finished product in a refrigerated room next to the brewery that cooling room feeds directly to four taps in the wall of his basement bar. The brewery is just one of many caverns in his man cave, which also includes a game room, a home theater and a wet bar.

“You can go downstairs, and you can pretty much stay there,” Mr. Rabe said. “Only thing it doesn’t have is a bed.”

Sometimes, even a basement bar is not enough for a home brewer. Christopher Bowen built a pub to go along with his 10-gallon brewery, both in an 800-square-foot shed on waterfront property in Bethlehem, Pa., that also holds a cottage he owns with his sister and a friend. Mr. Bowen, a 44-year-old financial planner and father of three, calls the shed the HammerSmith Brewery and Alehouse. Inside it resembles a British pub, complete with 24 lidded 20-ounce beer steins reserved for regular visitors.

Mr. Bowen, who favors making ales and long-forgotten beers, first ventured into home brewing seven years ago, when he stopped into a local supply shop to get a birthday present for a friend and left with $300 of brewing equipment for himself.

Soon, he was entering competitions and in 2007 won a gold medal at the 30-year-old Great American Beer Festival, the nation’s largest beer gathering, held annually in Denver. Most Saturday mornings, he can be found brewing in the shed he also plays the role of a brewer in local historical reenactments and is popular on the home-brewing lecture circuit.

The competition Mr. Bowen won is just one of the hundreds of competitions worldwide each year. Even professional breweries give home brews a shot at stardom. In the annual Longshot contest held by the Boston Beer Company, makers of Samuel Adams beers, home brewers send in recipes the two winners have their beers brewed, bottled (with their likenesses on the label) and distributed to a national audience.

Mr. Bowen’s home pub has televisions, comfortable seating, a dartboard and a cellar filled with whiskey and wine barrels used for aging beer. Everything a beer lover needs — almost.

“We just don’t have a bathroom,” Mr. Bowen said. “But we are in pretty secluded area, or the cottage is just 20 steps away if needed.”

Cloning A Favorite

HERE is a neat party trick some home brewers play. They offer their friends, say, a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, and see if they catch on that it came not from a bottle but from a home recipe.

Such beers are known as clone brews, and there are books, Web sites and online forums dedicated to the art of deconstructing the commercially sold beers they mimic. Following recipes that are often provided by breweries themselves, interested brewers can whip up favorites like Samuel Adams Boston Lager or New Belgium Fat Tire Amber Ale.

“Commercial beers serve as a common language,” said Randy Mosher, a Chicago-based beer consultant and author of “Radical Brewing: Recipes, Tales and World-Altering Meditations in a Glass.” “It’s a place where home brewers can understand taste familiarity.”

To learn how to brew your favorite commercial beer, like Guinness, Bass Ale and Chimay Red, pick up a copy of “Clone Brews: Homebrew Recipes for 150 Commercial Beers,” by Tess and Mark Szamatulski, a husband and wife who own a home-brewing supply shop in Connecticut. Also, Web sites like HomeBrewTalk.com and tastybrew.com offer user-submitted recipes for commercial as well as original beers in their forum sections.

In formulating clone beers, which can be made with even a rudimentary brewing system like the $40 Mr. Beer kit, the home brewer will see, taste and smell each ingredient individually. “The goal should be to tear apart the beer you are drinking to understand it,” Mr. Mosher said.

Once home brewers have successfully mimicked a recipe, they can begin a process that Mr. Mosher calls “wandering in the wilderness” — inventing his own recipes.

“I see brewing as an art form,” Mr. Mosher said. “You can sit in a museum and copy paintings, but eventually you want to find your own voice.”


Homebrewers double down on pandemic beer

COVID-19 IN COLORADO

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And that’s exactly what the Rock Hoppers Brew Club in Douglas County did when the pandemic hit. A handful of the club’s members have brewed five times or more since March.

“The general feeling is people are brewing because it means less trips out to the (beer) store,” said Eric Gould, the club president. “Maybe they are not drinking more, but they are drinking more homebrew.”

Gould, an award-winning homebrewer from Centennial who is looking to become a professional, said the five batches he’s made in two months is double his normal rate. Like him, the club members “have the time on their hands and they’ve got the stuff, so why not make it?”

The club moved its meetings to Zoom and hosted a day-long video call as members made beer for the AHA’s Big Brew Day on May 2. The drawback is the club members can’t get together to sample each other’s creations and offer feedback.

The beer Gould made as part of the national homebrew day is a double chocolate oatmeal porter — made only with ingredients he had at home left over from past recipes.

“It’s a pandemic beer,” he said.

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Watch the video: Νέα ντοκουμέντα φρίκης από τους Ταλιμπάν. Βραδινό Δελτίο. 18082021 (December 2021).