New recipes

Falling in Love With Heartbreak in the East Village

Falling in Love With Heartbreak in the East Village

I have searched in vain in New York City for decent authentic Swiss fondue since the heartbreaking shuttering in 2002 of Roetelle AG (abbreviation for Actien-Gesellschaft — a Swiss stock corporation). Despite the name, we're not talking about Credit Suisse. We're talking about the coziest, most romantic tiny Swiss restaurant on East 7th street just west of Avenue A where Ingrid Roetelle presided over a rabbit warren of candlelit rooms with a few windows looking out at brick walls where couples fell in love while drinking German beer and wine and dunking stale bread into a blend of cheeses, wine, kirschwasser, cloves and garlic the likes of which have not been experienced outside of Zurich. Indeed, we used to joke, my wife and I, that there was so much booze in Ingrid's fondue that we would get drunk from the fondue alone without the aid of the beer and wine.

With the opening of Heartbreak Restaurant on East 2nd and 2nd Avenue, the heartbreak of a fondue-less city is finally over. A sleek, bright red modern industrial minimalist design is a far cry from the old maze-like restaurant, but Ingrid herself greets guests. Stellar service ensures that your fondue pots remain well heated to avoid any chance of gloppiness in the perfect cheese blend.

Though fondue is a must, start with the charcuterie plate consisting of smoked duck, lamb, speck, bresaola (or what the Swiss call viande de grison or bündnerfleisch), and alpine cheese. Other appetizers include the thickly sliced house-smoked salmon, which appears as a rose petal atop Switzerland's other great contribution to world cuisine: roesti, a pan-fried light airy potato pie that is insultingly compared to heavier, greasier Jewish latkes or potato pancakes. If word among Jews (and I'm Jewish) ever gets out about Ingrid's roesti, the miracle of Hanukkah will be forgotten.

The fondue has enough wine and kirschwasser (a cherry liquor) in it to sedate a wild boar. The wiener schnitzel (choice of veal or pork) would do any Austrian proud accompanied by perfect spaetzle. For dessert, an apfelstrudel with a vanilla bourbon sauce that makes American apple pie seem unpatriotic.

I'm begging you. Get out of the cold and snow, go to Heartbreak with someone you love and fall in love all over again with Ingrid's fondue and with each other.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.


Memories of Di Bella Bros. on First Avenue

Back in April, we posted the ghost signage that EVG regular evilnyc spotted over at the Hamptons Market on First Avenue and East 13th Street . it was the name of the former longtime tenant — Di Bella Bros., the beloved specialty foods market that opened here in 1925. A New York magazine article from August 1984 noted that Carmine and John Di Bella retired in the early 1980s . and that they sold the business to Sue and Jason Shim, "who have mastered most of their recipes."

This past weekend, we heard from John C. Di Bella Jr., who had just come across the post. He said he was happy to see the positive comments about his family's market. he also shared some memories and history.

I worked for my dad and uncle Carmine during my teen years. I, too, have so many great memories. I learned how to speak Sicilian. I learned how to bone a prosciutto, make the famous stuffed peppers, stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms and all the other recipes that I still know to this day.

I remember the room in the back of the store, which was filled with shelves with cheeses. We also had our own Olive Oil DiBella Bros brand, which was packed in the basement. I vividly recall the way they dressed with a tie and deli jacket. There was a warm and family feeling especially around the holidays.

The original Di Bella Food store was located at 273 Bleeker St. and was run and operated by the eldest brother Ben and youngest brother Mike while John and Carmine served in the U.S. Military. When they returned, John and Benny and Mike moved to 215 First Avenue and 13th Street. Carmine purchased his own deli in Corona, Queens, which was owned and operated by the former Gov. Mario Cuomo's parents. He later joined John on 13th Street.

The most important thing I learned from my dad and uncles were the strong work ethic which enabled me to go forward and become a successful businessman myself.

I am attaching a picture that I have of the store, which was taken sometime in the 1940s. You can see the old Di Bella sign and the Palermo Bakery, which made the best Italian bread in the world.