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North African Shakshouka

North African Shakshouka


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Here's a quick and easy throw it all in one pan style dish for weekend breakfast and brunch affairs. In connecting more with the diversity and richness of my african heritage (diaspora baby!), I'm trying out dishes that show off the variety of the continent. I'm curious to find out my exact lineage through DNA testing. My Ancestry.com research brought me all the way to Barbados through part of my paternal lineage, but I haven't dug into the maternal side of my father's lineage. My mother's lineage on both sides connects me to Ireland, and I am SO looking forward to learning how to cook authentic Irish meals in the future. (YASSS Boxty) Shakshouka meaning "to shake" or "mixture" is a dish common to Libya, Tunisia, and Egypt and was brought to Israel by immigrant jews in the 1950s. Served with eggs, beans, artichokes, and/or spicy sausage, this dish is a winter favorite. The perfect dish to practice before the cooler fall months (though I swear its the easiest dish possible) and whip out on a brisk winter morning. Best of all, its all made in one pan. So there's no trove dishes to wash afterwards. I took some liberties with my recipe to adapt it to our taste preference and to make it extra spicy!

Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 2 red peppers (julienned)
  • 1 yellow pepper (julienned)
  • 2 medium tomatoes (sliced and quartered)
  • 1/4 Cup red onion
  • 3 garlic cloves (minced)
  • 1 Tablespoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 Teaspoon chopped basil
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 Teaspoon tumeric
  • salt/pepper to taste
  • 1 Cup vegetable broth
  • 6 Ounces sliced jalapeño cheese
  • 4 large eggs

Servings3

Calories Per Serving402

Folate equivalent (total)117µg29%

Riboflavin (B2)0.7mg39.8%


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Shakshuka (a Hearty North African dish)

I’m in a cooking group called The Avid Baker’s Challenge and they’ve chosen recipes by David Lebovitz for 2018. The Avid Bakers do bake, but also occasionally have savory dishes, too!

This month Shakshuka was chosen as the spotlight recipe. It’s a North African dish with deep, earthy spices in a tomato base with a poached egg nestled in the sauce. Kind of like Huevos Rancheros with different spices and no tortillas.

I was surprised at how easy it was to make, although I made sure and had all of the ingredients at the ready.

This Shakshuka recipe looks like it has a lot of ingredients, but many of them are just spices you throw in. I was looking forward to see how this tasted since it has turmeric, which I’ve never cooked with, caraway, paprika, honey, and vinegar among other ingredients.

The tangy tomatoes, onion, the spices, and the rest of the ingredients created an extraordinary sauce! The carefully poached egg was gently basted and when eaten, the yolk combined with the sauce to make an eye-rolling experience. Sounds ethereal, right? It was.

It’s such a different dish with clean, fresh ingredients. I sopped up all I could with the garlic bread and was very sad when it was gone.

I guess you can tell I liked this Shakshuka. I’ll be making it over and over – a definite permanent addition to my virtual recipe box. I quartered David Lebovitz’s version of this (full recipe here) and it worked nicely.

I will probably add one more egg to the single serving because the egg vs. sauce was so very good.

I hope you’ll try this one. I’m looking forward to trying more of Mr. Lebovitz’s recipes over the coming year!


Watch the video: Nordafrika (May 2022).


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