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Running to Lose Weight Is a Terrible Idea

Running to Lose Weight Is a Terrible Idea


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It’s a pitfall of too many dieters: They decide to “get healthy” — by which they mean “lose weight” — so they start eating salads and going on runs.

Ugh.

Experienced runners everywhere hear this and cringe. Running to lose weight is a terrible idea.

Weight loss is not only an appearance-oriented reason to run that likely won’t provide enough intrinsic motivation to last, but it’s also a misguided motivation. Running does not efficiently, if ever, make you lose weight.

Running is what exercise professionals like to call “steady-state cardio.” This is cardio that lacks the intensity to produce an extreme response by the body; you can tell this because your heart rate remains relatively stable throughout the run.

Your body is smart: It goes first for the stores of energy it saves from intra-muscular stores of fat, circulating free fatty acids, muscle and liver glycogen, and blood glucose, all of which it uses to fuel your daily activities and lower-intensity conditions of exercise.

So you’re not actually burning fat with exercise until your body needs more energy much quicker — during high-intensity exercise. When your heart rate is at an extreme high, your body recognizes it’s under extreme conditions, and it dips into its precious, last-resort stores of fat.

If you were to go on interval training runs, where you ran sprints or trudged up hills, you might enter this actual fat-burning zone.

But if we’re talking normal running, you would have to run for hours and hours to run out of alternative sources of energy (or eat dangerously little, which we do not recommend you do). And even if you do run for hours and hours, it might still not work to dip into your fat stores and lose the weight you want to.

I’ve known people who have trained for a marathon with the intention of shedding pounds. During their training, I watched them run mile after mile and become increasingly agitated because they continued to gain weight as the runs got lengthier.

This (understandable) frustration comes from a misunderstanding many people hold about health. “The healthier I get, the thinner I’ll be!” False. Sometimes, the healthier you get, the more weight you put on. Your body’s just trying to survive, after all.

Allow me to explain. When you run, your body expends a great deal of energy — especially when you’re running long distances. Here’s something your body doesn’t want to be: tired.

There are a few different places your body searches for its energy: your food, your fat, and your muscle. First, it’s going to plow through your energy from food. If you’re trying to lose weight, it’s probable that you’re eating at a calorie deficit, i.e., expending more energy than you consume. So you’re likely not eating the extra calories you would need to support those runs. So when it’s out of that, it has to choose: Is it going to dip into your fat or your muscle?

It will likely dip into your muscle. Your body’s on preservation mode. What does it need more, the energy stored from fat or the muscle that burns fat?

Try driving a car on just a few droplets of gas at a time. That’s the mechanical equivalent of trying to force your body to function without gathering an energy reserve. Now imagine that a car was smart enough to save gas for later. What do you think it’d do?

Your body saves fuel for later. It puts on weight — saves some gas. And it plows through the unnecessary muscle (running requires a minimal amount of physical strength). So as you get better at running, as you practice and run longer distances, you might just get heavier. And healthier. You’ll gain endurance, build a few key muscles in your legs, improve mental and physical stamina. You’ll be more capable, better equipped to outrun an attacker, and have a much stronger heart.

You might just get healthier and heavier. At the same time.

Now, that’s not to say you shouldn’t run. If you want to run, by all means — run! Just don’t do it for weight loss.

There are so many more valuable reasons to feel proud of running a marathon or dedicating yourself to training that have nothing to do with fat loss or whether you can fit into those size 4 jeans. Here are a few:

  • Get in better touch with your body.
  • Get healthier and stronger (though maybe heavier).
  • Spend meditative time outdoors.
  • Fight depression.
  • Alleviate anxiety.
  • Join a new and uplifting community of other runners.

And there are many more. Everyone’s reason to run is different, but they should all have one thing in common — they shouldn’t involve running to lose weight.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.


14 Delicious Meals in Less Than 30 Minutes

Recipes from the latest Runner's World cookbook.

Not sure what to eat on race morning? In need of some tasty midrun energy? Want to ensure you properly kick-start recovery? Do it all with the latest Runner's World cookbook&mdasha collection of more than 150 recipes ready in 30 minutes or less.

Before You Run

If you've ever woken up early for a race or long run (and every runner does, eventually), you know how difficult it can be to eat well in the predawn hours. Maybe you simply aren't hungry when you first get up. Or race nerves leave you feeling queasy. If you're staying at a hotel (without your go-to foods readily available), you risk eating something that upsets your stomach. Happily, these quick breakfast ideas will fuel you up for a tough training run or race without weighing you down&mdashand if you pack a few ingredients, you can even make some of these meals in a hotel room, too.

&ldquoBaked&rdquo Granola Apples
The secret behind getting these &ldquobaked&rdquo apples on the table fast? Cooking them in the microwave, which quickly steams the fruit until perfectly tender. Braeburn, Cortland, or Rome varieties work just as well as Gala. Use a spoon or melon baller to core the halved apples. Top the finished dish with a dollop of yogurt for a protein and calcium boost.

Ingredients
2 large crisp apples, such as Gala, halved and cored
2 tablespoons chopped dried tart cherries
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons butter
½ cup granola

Instructions
In a microwavable dish, arrange the apple halves cut side up.

Top each apple half evenly with the tart cherries and brown sugar. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Dot evenly with the butter.

Cover the apples with a microwavable dome lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap. Microwave on high for about 4 minutes, or until the apples are tender.

Transfer the apples to serving bowls and sprinkle each apple half evenly with the granola. Drizzle any juices remaining in the cooking dish over the top. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 181
Carbs: 29 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 2 g
Total fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Sodium: 38 mg

Good Morning Sweet Potato
Sweet potatoes for breakfast? Absolutely. These carb-packed vegetables are loaded with runner-friendly nutrients&mdashand provide a welcome break from typical morning fare. &ldquoThe flavors in this recipe will remind you of Thanksgiving,&rdquo says Mark Bittman, Runner's World contributing food writer.

Ingredients
1 medium sweet potato
¼ cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Instructions
Pierce the sweet potato all over with a fork. Microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes, turning over once or twice, or until the center is soft.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the walnuts, maple syrup, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat until the nuts are coated and fragrant.

Slice open the top of the potato lengthwise, leaving the bottom intact. Mash the nut mixture on top. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 355
Carbs: 44 g
Fiber: 6 g
Protein: 7 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 220 mg

Gingered Winter Greens Smoothie
As a cruciferous vegetable, kale contains compounds called glucosinolates that have been shown to have anticancer properties. Adding fresh ginger and a kiwi&mdashwhich provides more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C&mdashhelps soften the natural bitterness of the leafy green.

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened coconut water
½ cup low-fat plain yogurt
1 kiwi fruit, peeled
1 large kale leaf, center rib removed
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon honey
Pinch of salt
½ cup ice cubes

Instructions
In a blender, combine the coconut water, yogurt, kiwi, kale, ginger, honey, salt, and ice. Blend until smooth. Serves 1.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 188
Carbs: 38 g
Fiber: 3 g
Protein: 8 g
Total fat: 2 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 272 mg

RELATED: Prep great meals (in less time!) with Meals on the Run.

CARB PARTY

Fuel up the night before your long run or big race with one of these energy-packed meals.

Kara Goucher&rsquos Kitchen Sink Pizza
Two-time Olympian and marathoner Kara Goucher cooks up these easy flatbread pizzas at least once a week. If you&rsquore planning to grill, set aside one grilled chicken breast (about 6 ounces cooked) to use for this recipe. Otherwise, you can use a rotisserie chicken breast. You can also substitute leftover grilled vegetables for the fresh bell pepper, tomatoes, and mushrooms.

Ingredients
4 whole wheat naan flatbreads
½ cup marinara sauce
4 teaspoons pesto
1 cup shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese (4 ounces)
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ red onion, sliced
½ cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini (about 2 ounces)
1 grilled chicken breast, diced
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
8 large fresh basil leaves, cut into thin ribbons

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Arrange the naans on 2 baking sheets. Spread a thin layer of marinara across the breads. Top each with a teaspoon of the pesto and swirl into the sauce. Sprinkle the naans with the mozzarella. Top with the bell pepper, tomatoes, onion, and mushrooms. Add the chicken and finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan.

Bake the naan pizzas for 12 minutes, or until the breads brown, the vegetables are softened, and the cheese melts.

Serve the naan pizzas garnished with the basil. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 506
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 30 g
Total fat: 19 g
Saturated fat: 7 g
Sodium: 877 mg

Spaghetti with Sun-Dried Tomato Sauce
This no-cook sauce comes together quickly in the blender while the pasta cooks on the stove.

Ingredients
½ cup almonds
1 box (1 pound) bucatini or spaghetti
1 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 anchovy fillets
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
½ teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or a pinch of dried
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, place the almonds in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast for 7 minutes, stirring or shaking the skillet occasionally, until fragrant and slightly golden. Set aside.

When the water boils, salt it and add the bucatini. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, combine the toasted almonds, sun-dried tomatoes, oil, anchovies, garlic, basil, oregano, and salt and process about 1 minute, until just blended.

Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta in a colander and return it to the pot.

Add the ½ cup pasta cooking water to the sauce in the food processor. Pulse a few times until combined. Add the sauce to the pasta and toss well to coat. Serve topped with the Parmesan. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 497
Carbs: 64 g
Fiber: 5 g
Protein: 16 g
Total fat: 21 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Sodium: 606 mg

Pizza Margherita
Pizza doesn&rsquot get simpler or more delicious than this. Fresh mozzarella melts beautifully and, thanks to its high water content, is naturally lower in fat than many hard cheeses. If you don&rsquot want to make tomato sauce and don&rsquot have any on hand, substitute 2 fresh plum tomatoes, sliced crosswise.

Ingredients
1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup homemade or jarred tomato sauce
4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, patted dry and torn into ¾-inch pieces
6 large basil leaves, roughly torn
¼ cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Roll the dough into a 12 x 9-inch rectangle no more than ¼ inch thick. Brush 1 teaspoon of the oil over a 1-inch border all around the rectangle.

Spread the pizza sauce over the dough, leaving the 1-inch border uncovered. Lay the mozzarella pieces on the sauce. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the crust is golden and crisp and the cheese is bubbling. Top with the basil. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 387
Carbs: 49 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 5 g
Sodium: 473 mg

Spaghetti Carbonara
This classic Italian pasta is as satisfyingly delicious as it is easy to make. While not traditional, sautéed onions add a note of sweetness, and peas provide a pop of color and nutrients.

Ingredients
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 box (1 pound) spaghetti
½ sweet onion, chopped
3 large eggs
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
1 cup frozen peas
¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

While waiting for the water to boil, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a plate lined with a paper towel. Set aside.

Meanwhile, when the water boils, salt it and add the spaghetti. Cook according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, return the skillet to the stove over medium heat (if there is more than 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the skillet, drain it first). Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs well with a fork. Season with salt and pepper.

Two minutes before the spaghetti is done, add the peas. Reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, drain the spaghetti and peas in a colander and return to the still-hot pot. Immediately add the eggs, reserved ½ cup cooking water, and the onions. Toss well to coat the spaghetti (the residual heat from the pasta will gently cook the eggs as they coat the spaghetti). Sprinkle with the Parmesan, bacon, and parsley, and toss well again.

Serve with additional ground black pepper, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 443
Carbs: 61 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 21 g
Total fat: 12 g
Saturated fat: 4.5 g
Sodium: 494 mg

Soba Noodles with Peanut-Sesame Sauce
You can serve the noodles slightly warm or at room temperature. If you make it ahead and chill it, let it come to room temperature to serve. You can also use this no-cook peanut-sesame sauce in a stir-fry.

Quick tip: While buckwheat is a gluten-free whole grain, many brands of soba noodles are made with wheat as well. Gluten-free runners should be sure to read labels closely.

Ingredients
1 package (8 ounces) buckwheat soba noodles
1 cup (3 ounces) snow peas, halved
¼ cup no-sugar-added creamy peanut butter
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water boils, add the soba noodles. Cook according to the package directions, adding the snow peas during the last minute of cooking.

While the noodles cook, in a food processor, combine the peanut butter, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger and process for 30 seconds, or until smooth.

When the noodles are done, drain them along with the peas in a colander and rinse them well under cool water until the water runs clear. Drain well again and return the noodles and peas to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions to the noodles and toss well to coat.

Serve garnished with the sesame seeds. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 391
Carbs: 52 g
Fiber: 2 g
Protein: 14 g
Total fat: 17 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Sodium: 952 mg

Pasta with Peas and Prosciutto
&ldquoThis is an easy pasta to whip up when short on time,&rdquo says Runner&rsquos World contributing chef Nate Appleman. If you can find fresh, in-season peas, use them here. Otherwise, frozen peas will work just fine add them 1 minute sooner in the recipe.

Ingredients
1 box (1 pound) cavatappi or other spiral pasta
1½ cups fresh spring peas
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
½ cup grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Juice of ½ lemon
4 ounces (about 8 thin slices) prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

Instructions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When it boils, salt it and add the pasta. Cook according to the package directions. Two minutes before the pasta is cooked, add the peas.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until slightly browned.

Reserving ¼ cup pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and peas in a colander. Add the peas, pasta, and reserved cooking water to the skillet, toss, and heat through, about 1 minute. Add the pepper, cheese, and lemon juice and toss to combine.

Serve the pasta in shallow bowls and place the prosciutto over top, letting the heat from the pasta warm the meat. Serves 6.

Nutrition Information
Calories per serving: 403
Carbs: 63 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 20 g
Total fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 654 mg

ON THE GO

Anytime you run longer than an hour, you should pack some fuel to power you through your workout. Energy gels and chews are a convenient choice, but sometimes you want something more substantial&mdashand satisfying. These energy bars and balls are quick to make, really delicious, and offer a good amount of energizing carbs.

Honey Energy Bars
These sweet, crunchy, and slightly chewy bars are the perfect prerun pick-me-up. Honey provides simple sugars (fructose and glucose) that are quickly absorbed and will energize your workout. Honey also contains oligosaccharides, a type of sugar that may promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the intestinal tract. Studies show that these carbohydrates serve as fuel for immune-boosting bacteria in the gut.



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