New recipes

Old-School Kitsch on the Strip

Old-School Kitsch on the Strip

It’s not off any lobby on the Strip, there’s no VIP list, and there are definitely no celebrity sightings, but the Peppermill Fireside Lounge is quintessential Vegas.

It’s a throwback to the old Vegas, with kitschy décor and Technicolor cocktails. The front is a greasy-spoon diner serving all the classics you’d expect to see, though I cannot vouch for them at all, having never eaten there. The main draw, for me at least, is the back-room bar — the Fireside Lounge, which is all kinds of semi-ironic ‘90s fabulousness, with flaming pools, plasma screens, deep purple lighting, and fake trees throughout.

The cocktails are bright, neon shades of blues and orange and taste nothing like the masterfully mixed cocktails you’re probably used to. But they are part of the experience — a wildly fun and once swanky side of Vegas that’s all but expired on the Strip’s main drag.

You have to have a sense of humor to appreciate the Peppermill: Just sidle into a dark booth in the corner and people-watch, it’ll be the perfect start to the night.


10 of the best alternative and old-school hotels in Las Vegas

The Flamingo may not be the most luxurious hotel in the world, as it was billed when Bugsy Siegel first opened its doors in 1946, and it's certainly not the classiest – but this pink emblazoned establishment has retro charm and a whole lot of history. Legend has it that the hotel's name was inspired by Bugsy's admiration for his girlfriend Virginia Hill's enviably long legs, which reminded him of a Flamingo. The faint smell of coconut in the corridors, coupled with black and candy-pink decor, might make you think of an X-rated Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory, but in Vegas you just have to embrace the bizarre. The 'GO WING' has been recently renovated.
3555 Las Vegas Boulevard, +1 702 733 3111, flamingolasvegas.com, 'GO' Rooms from $65


31 Best Easy Slow Cooker Chicken Recipes

The crockpot is so versatile and you can rely on it for making all your favorite Slow Cooker Chicken Recipes! We’ll delve into the chicken breasts, chicken thighs, whole chicken, healthy, and popular chicken recipes…easily cooked in a slow cooker! In this post, we’ve rounded up some of the best crock pot chicken meals: Chicken…


The 10 best delis in Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh needs more great delis. Seriously, every neighborhood should have at least one.

How is it possible that there’s no longer a deli on Squirrel Hill’s main drag? Greenfield also had a brush with deli greatness: Remember Szmidt’s Old World Deli, now gone?

But rather than mourn the lost delis of long ago, we’re here to point you toward the truly noteworthy ones you can find around town right now.

Here are 10 of our favorites. If we haven’t mentioned one that you love, tell us about it in the comments below or on our Facebook page. (We’re defining deli as a place that slices meat, sells sandwiches and is generally thought of as a deli — although that does eliminate one of our very favorites, the Pear and the Pickle, which calls itself a cafe but includes a great deli.)

Smallman Street Deli, Strip District

In the Strip, where you’re as likely to encounter a robot-operated car as a human-driven one, there’s a classic deli that’s as low-tech and old-school as it gets. Corned beef, pastrami and roast beef are all made on the spot, using recipes that haven’t changed since 1958. You can’t miss with the Pastrami Deli Burger or the Smallman Street Reuben. They also do a great (and giant) Grilled Chicken Sandwich. (The only drawback is figuring out how to get it in your mouth.) Their website makes the claim, “The Best Food in Pittsburgh” — I believe that’s called chutzpah. The food is actually great, though — fresh, hearty and filling. Their long-time Squirrel Hill location is now closed, unfortunately.

Photo courtesy of Rocchio’s Italian Deli.

Rocchio’s Italian Deli, Dormont

Is Dormont the local deli capital? With Fredo’s (see below) and Rocchio’s across the street from each other, you can barely walk down Potomac Avenue without someone handing you a sandwich. Go to Rocchio’s on Fridays to get the Basile Hot Stuffed Banana Pepper sandwich, with hot sausage from Labriola’s Italian Market on a fresh Mancini’s sausage roll — a big, delicious mess of a sandwich. On Thursdays, there are hefty pasta and meatball bowls for the lunch rush. They’ve also got excellent gelato and sweet things from Kraina Pastries.

Balkan specialties like cevapi sausages (made with beef and veal) are the main draw here. Try the sudjukice — four spicy sausage links on homemade bread. Fredo’s also has a full menu of hoagies, with all the classics represented. A favorite: the Sicilian with prosciutto, spicy capicola, hard salami, provolone and roasted red peppers. They also do panini, chicken wings and gyros, along with a wide selection of imported European snacks and groceries.

Groceria Merante in Oakland. Photo by Mike Machosky.

S&D Polish Deli, Strip District

First off, it’s a disgrace that Pittsburgh has so few Polish restaurants. Luckily, S&D doesn’t take their lack of competition as a reason to get lazy. This is the place to go for a fantastic smoked kielbasy sandwich with sauerkraut. They’ve also got expertly made pierogies in all the classic varieties. Go for the kraut and mushroom or the farmer’s cheese and potato pierogies, then stay for the Polish kitsch on sale in the adjacent store. Bonus: You can get all the Polish sausage your heart desires to go with it for an extremely satisfying meal.

Groceria Merante, Oakland

In the neighborhood where many students opt to live during college and after graduating, Groceria Merante remains a constant. Celebrating its 40th year, this charming time capsule from the pre-supermarket era is packed to the rafters with Italian everything, from prosciutto to pasta to homemade hot sausage. Their giant $5 Italian hoagies, piled high with pepperoni, mortadella and hot peppers, are a rite of passage for a semester in Oakland. You can also pick up fresh produce like peaches and watermelons, along with cooking staples like olive oil and balsamic vinegar.


Any themed motel oldschool, kitch style recommendations?

I'm planning a surprise trip to Vegas with a special someone - she's artsy like me and I think a old school, kitch like motel, not too expensive would be perfect for that for a stay over the weekend, arriving Friday or Thursday evening..any recommendations? I don't care if its on the strip, off the strip, old town Vegas, there's always Uber and or public transportation to get to the heart of it (and a concert that I got us tickets for ) )

Maybe check out Clairbnb for themed/kitsch accommodation and be sure to check out Frankie's Tiki Room for a drink.

A modern new room cleverly decorated to appear "kitch" - no. The Artisan is maybe really close though.

Rooms so outdated & lacking renovations that "kitch" is an overly optimistic synonym for Old ?? - yes

Of those, the pyramid suggestion is where you should stay. It's on-strip, Safe, clean, attributes the other kitch places may not have in adequate abundance for everyone.

They lowered the furniture into the Luxor pyramid through the windows before the glass was put on. Now they can't get it out! They are fun, kitchy, well worn rooms with a story inside a giant glass pyramid. You'll Love em!

The most un-Vegas room I've stayed in, is the Cromwell. However it's neither old nor cheap. The decor is very unique though.

Artisan Hotel Boutique. [email protected] . Not a motel, but worth checking out.

-:- Message from Tripadvisor staff -:-

This post has been removed at the author's request. The author may repost if desired.

Posts on the Tripadvisor forums may be edited for a short period of time. Once the edit period has expired, authors may update their posts by removing and reposting them.

To read more about editing your posts, please follow this link: http://www.tripadvisor.com/help/how_to_edit_your_posts

The rooms in the Gold Spike were turned into low cost apartments for ZAPPOS employees and other workers at the Downtown Project and are not being rented out as a hotel. The Oasis at the Gold Spike is a motel and they do rent rooms. The OP asked for a motel, not a hotel. Tony Hsieh (CEO of ZAPPOS) and his Downtown Project purchased the Gold Spike and the Oasis. The Oasis calls itself a Hotel, but it is a motel. That may just what you are look for.

+ 1 Luxor Pyramid Standard room or pyramid suite

As a fellow disciple of the John Waters/ Andy Warhol esthetic - I would highly recommend the El Cortez Cabana Suites - one of my best stays in Vegas - Also a big fan of Flamingo's Go Rooms - just the right amount of tacky & a great location on the strip


Old-school: Tradition reigns at classic neighborhood pizza parlors

Where time is measured in decades, the founding families still run the show, the recipes remain carefully guarded secrets and the decor conjurs a vibe no kitsch-on-purpose modern designer could replicate, these are Chicago's old-school pizza parlors. Spread throughout the city and suburbs, each boasts a charm, loyal following and signature pizza style that you just don't see anymore. We take a step back in time for visits to four of them: Vito & Nick's, Candlelite, Louisa's Pizza & Pasta and Barnaby's of Northbrook.

VITO & NICK'S

It can be argued that Chicago's best pizzas can be found on the edges of the city, away from the hordes of tourists who get their pizza facts from the carnival barkers of the Food Network. Vito & Nick's is one such pizza place.

A South Side institution for nearly 100 years — "One hundred in three years and 10 months," says Rose George, Vito's granddaughter, Nick's daughter and fifth-generation owner — the place practically invented the tavern-style pizza, the scrappy younger sibling to Chicago's deep-dish. "I've been eating pizza my whole life," says George, "and the heart of Chicago pizza is truly thin crust. I don't care what anyone says."

Step into the restaurant, which has been at its current location since 1965, and you'll feel like you've stepped onto a set from "That '70s Show." Turquoise bar seats, brightly colored overhead lights and wood-paneled walls all contribute to the space's retro charm. What it lacks in modern finery, it more than makes up for in its flavorful pies — the real draw to this sleepy strip off Pulaski Road.

It all starts with — of course — a secret family recipe for the crust. "It's not even written down," says George. Baked to within an inch of its life, this pizza is the paragon of thin crust-style. Shatteringly crisp, it has the red sauce tenderly smeared from edge to edge, covered evenly with a veil of mozzarella and your desired topping. Sausage is classic, but the egg pizza, available only on Fridays, is a textural treat — four eggs are cracked near the center of the pie and allowed to spread like tectonic plates on the ocean floor. The resulting pie is savory and salty as the cheese melts and melds with the egg whites, the just-cooked yolk acts as a seasoning for bites in the center of the pie.

Cash-only with a dine-in policy, Vito & Nick's is, by design, a destination restaurant. "It's my dad's philosophy," says George. "If they want my pizza, they'll come here and get it."

8433 S. Pulaski Road 773-735-2050 and www.vitoandnicks.com

Calling West Rogers Park home since 1950, Candlelite is an old-school pizza joint that has kept up with the times over the years. The neighborhood spot located on a northern stretch of Western Avenue still boasts a shiny, retro marquee sign out front, enticing customers new and old to stop in for a pie. But the inside boasts the trappings of a more modern pub.

Along its walls, you'll see plaques from local sports teams sponsored by the bar, while a giant menu on the wall offers new craft brews alongside bar stalwarts like PBR and Old Style.

The order here is Candlelite's signature white pizza. The pie comes with a snow-white blanket of mozzarella, provolone, Parmesan and goat cheese, studded with golden knobs of whole roasted garlic and strings of caramelized onions. The cracker crust, while not as flavorful as others like it, still delivers a texture akin to a saltine, even as it's weighed down by the molten dairy. Order it well-done and you won't be disappointed. The other pies on offer span your usual (margherita) to whimsical (mac 'n cheese), but the simpler pies are the way to go.

7452 N. Western Ave. 773-465-0087 and candlelitechicago.com

LOUISA'S PIZZA & PASTA

Founded in 1981 by Louisa DeGenero, this eponymous Crestwood restaurant is a family affair. From the handmade pastas to its now-famous pizzas — arguably one of Chicagoland's best deep-dish variations — DeGenero's family still runs the show.

A longtime employee of Ike Sewell at Pizzeria Due and colleague of a guy you may know (Lou Malnati, I think?), DeGenero started Louisa's because "she wanted to do things her own way," says her grandson Ed Fitzgerald.

That includes developing the proprietary crust Louisa's is known for — only Fitzgerald and his siblings know the recipe. "No one's even allowed in the room when we make it," he says. The way he tells it, there's an order of operations to that signature buttery crust, which is simultaneously fluffy and firm. Between the unbleached Cerasota flour and specific yeast strain, to the time it rests and how it moves around the Blodgett oven (pizzas are started on the lower level to remove humidity and moisture before they're crisped up and finished on the top level), Louisa's descendants have mastered the science and art of her pie.

When you order the marquee item, it arrives at your table in the dark, dimly lit dining room bubbling and threatening to escape its high-walled cast-iron pan. As your first slice is coaxed out of its blackened mooring, ooey-gooey strings of Wisconsin mozzarella follow the thick triangle of crust like contrails of an airplane. Allow it to cool a little before handling it with your hands, but feel free to dig in with knife and fork for a generous bite of hand-squeezed, herbaceous tomato puree and nuggets of Anichini Brothers sausage — Anichini Brothers, another family-run outfit, has been a Louisa's purveyor for 30-plus years.

To Louisa's family, nothing else compares. "What New York pizza? That paper stuff they fold over doesn't even register with me," says Fitzgerald about his grandmother's legacy. "We serve the same pizza today that we served 30 years ago. We don't have plans to change."


How to Do Old-School Las Vegas

These days, everything in Las Vegas seems shiny and new. For every building that’s knocked down, a luxury property rises from its ashes. Luckily, there’s still some old-school charm left in Sin City, where a few institutions still stand and traces of the Rat Pack linger. Head to Downtown Vegas, where a handful of these colorful characters have stood the test of time -- dotting the slower-moving streets with classic hotels, coin-operated games, and back-in-the-day dining. Here, our guide to old-school Las Vegas.

Where to Eat

You can find shrimp cocktail on nearly every menu in Las Vegas, but no place is more iconic as Du-Pars Restaurant and Bakery.The 24-hour coffee shop has been dishing out the low-priced "best tail in town" since 1959. Our waiter told us that he sells so many of these dishes that he "makes 'em in his sleep." If you're craving Italian food, head to Casa Di Amore, which is beloved by locals for its wily atmosphere. Go for the old-school lounge show where you’ll hear everything from show tunes to Al Green.

Where to Drink

The 24-hour Peppermill Fireside Lounge has been doing neon kitsch since 1972. The bright pink, purple, and blue colors, faux trees, and circular water fire pit are a staple for tourists and locals alike. Go for happy hour to sip martinis and snag a seat in the same spot that Sharon Stone and Robert De Niro did when they filmed Casino.

Where to Play

Book it to the second floor of the D Hotel, which is devoted entirely to vintage slot machines. The owner of the casino purchased a large amount of machines from the now-shuttered Riviera Hotel in 2015, paying homage to the classics. Don't miss the quarter Sigma Derby races: the only coin-operated game offered in Vegas.

For non-gamers, a spin around the world-class The Mob Museum will take you back to the city's sordid past when hotels were run by the mob. Located inside the former federal courthouse, the museum features 16,000 square feet of exhibition space that spans three floors. It's also one of the last remaining historical buildings in Las Vegas.

Where to Sleep

Rest your head at the Golden Gate Hotel & Casino. This ultra-historic hotel has been standing since 1906, claiming status as the city’s oldest casino in town. While the bones have been kept intact. Plus, the property is a steal: Score rooms as low as $15 per night, excluding resort fees and taxes.


Oven Baked Steak Recipe

Chuck eye steaks are also excellent.

Layer steaks in a shallow baking pan.

Pour enough water over steaks to cover.

Cover pan with tin foil, sealing around edges and bake in a preheated oven 350F. for 1 and 1/2  hours or until meat starts getting tender when probed with a fork. 

The time will depend on how thick your steaks are and the cut of beef.

Make several holes or small slits on both sides of steaks with the pointed end of a sharp kitchen knife.

Sprinkle each side sparingly with salt.

Place a few drops of the Hickory Smoke Flavoring on each side of steaks and brush or smear it over meat surface.

Separate sliced onions into rings and place those around on top of steaks.

Baste top sides of steaks with a few tablespoons of pan drippings giving time for the juices to run down into the punched holes. 

This maximizes the flavor and tenderizes the steak.

Replace tin foil and place place pan back into oven.

Baste steaks every 10-15 minutes, until liquid has reduced and meat is tender and browned.

Again, the time it takes  to finish cooking will be determined by the thickness and cut of the meat.

Also your personal preference of how done you like it.

While steak is baking,  prepare your rice according to the directions on your package. 

Season with salt and butter.


When steak is ready, lift them onto a serving platter or plate.

Spoon  some of the pan drippings over steaks and pour the remaining drippings over  the rice.

Suggestion: Serve steak with the rice and your favorite vegetable.

Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes are amazing with an Oven Baked Stea k.


If choosing mashed potatoes as a side to Oven Baked Steak, eliminate the rice.


Some 'The Old Man And The Sea' Quotes About Courage

Ernest Hemingway's quotations about fishing bring to life the fate of fishermen and the fish, the fight for food, and the need to muster courage in the face of adversities. Read on the 'Old Man And The Sea' hero quotes we have collected for you.

15. "Now is no time to think of what you do not have. Think of what you can do with what there is."

16. "But man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated."

17. "It's silly not to hope. It's a sin"

18. "Then the fish came alive, with his death in him, and rose high out of the water showing all his great length and width and all his power and his beauty."

19. "Let him think I am more man than I am and I will be so."

20. "I told the boy I was a strange old man. now is when I must prove it."

21. "I must never let him learn his strength nor what he could do if he made his run."

22. "I may not be as strong as I think. but I know many tricks and I have resolution."

23. "It is better to be lucky. But I would rather be exact. Then when luck comes you are ready."

24. "My choice was to go there to find him beyond all people. Beyond all people in the world."

25. "Remember we are in September."


20 Classic Restaurants Every Angeleno Must Try

Los Angeles is blessed with a plethora of long-standing restaurants. Even after decades of service, these establishments continue to thrive thanks to a loyal following of dedicated regulars who find comfort in dependable cooking and familiar hospitality. Here now are 20 classic restaurants every Angeleno must try at some point.

Removed: Lawry’s The Prime Rib, Musso & Frank Grill, Beverly Soon Tofu Restaurant, the Dresden, Pacific Dining Car, Bernie’s

Added: Chez Jay, Antonio’s Pizzeria & Italian Restaurant, George Petrelli Steak House, Bill’s Taco House, Colombo’s Italian Steakhouse & Jazz Club, Pann’s Restaurant

A number of LA restaurants have resumed on-site dining service. However, this map should not be taken as endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns: for updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the Los Angeles Public Health website. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


14 – In-N-Out Burger

Double-Double with Animal Style Fries

The final spot on my list of 14 of the best cheap eats in Las Vegas goes to In-N-Out Burger. Sure this is a fast food chain, but how could I leave it out. While there are locations across the Las Vegas Valley, my favorite In-N-Out Burger location in Las Vegas is at The LINQ Promenade. While you won’t find a drive-thru, you will find the same great tasting burgers and fresh ingredients. I always go for their signature Double-Double. As the name implies, this burger includes two meat patties, two slices of cheese, lettuce, tomato, onions, and sauce on a toasted bun. Order your burger “Animal Style” if you want pickles, chopped grilled onions, and an extra serving of In-N-Out’s secret sauce added to your Double-Double. As for me, I order my Double-Double with two types of onions, fresh and grilled, along with spicy chopped chilis.

What to order: Double-Double Animal Style

In-N-Out Burger
Address: 3545 S Las Vegas Blvd Suite #L24, Las Vegas, NV 89109 (located at The LINQ Promenade)
Hours: Sunday-Thursday: 10:30AM-1:00AM Friday-Saturday: 10:30AM-1:30AM

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


Watch the video: Las Vegas 1955 A Sunny Drive Down the Strip Old Vegas! (January 2022).