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New York Announced as Wine Region of the Year

New York Announced as Wine Region of the Year

Governor Cuomo announced the accolade that was bestowed by Wine Enthusiast

Wikimedia Commons

Move over California: it’s New York’s time to shine in wine.

New York has been recognized as this year’s number one wine region by Wine Enthusiast magazine. From the well-known vineyards in the Finger Lakes and Hudson Valley areas to the wineries along the North Fork of Long Island, the honor presented this week to Governor Andrew Cuomo, recognized the quality and diversity of wines, as well as the growth of wine regions in New York. In total, the Empire State is home to more than 37,000 acres of vineyards and 375 wineries statewide.

And according to Wine Enthusiast, this year’s recognition is a comeback award.

“The New York wine industry has made a remarkable comeback in the past thirty years in terms of the quality of wines, number of wineries, and economic impact,” said Adam Strum, Publisher and Editor of Wine Enthusiast. “All of those positive indicators have accelerated tremendously during the past four years, making New York State one of the most vibrant and promising wine regions in the world.”

See which New York wineries made The Daily Meal’s 101 Best Wineries list here.

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit our Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @JoannaFantozzi


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


Bordeaux winemakers allow new grapes to fight climate change

Touriga Nacional ready for harvesting in Portugal. It could soon be a feature of Bordeaux vineyards. Credit: S. Forster / Alamy

A proposal to allow the new grape varieties into Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur appellation vineyards passed a key winemaker vote late last week, according to a statement from the wine union, or Syndicat.

The seven varieties include Marselan and Portuguese favourite Touriga Nacional, plus the lesser known Castets and Arinarnoa, which is a cross between Tannat and Cabernet Sauvignon.

For white wines, the new grapes are Alvarinho, Petit Manseng and Liliorila, which was born in the 1950s following a crossing of Baroque and Chardonnay.

France’s national appellation authority, INAO, must still give final approval to the plan, but it is a potentially groundbreaking move to combat the effects of climate change.

Benefits of the seven grapes range from relatively good natural resistance to specific diseases, such as grey rot and mildew, to a proven ability to cope with warmer conditions.

Decanter’s Bordeaux expert, Jane Anson, said the plan should be a ‘wake-up call’ for the wider industry on climate change.

‘I would have expected Bordeaux bureaucracy to move more slowly, but clearly the governing bodies see the importance of giving winemakers the flexibility and agility to react.’

It is early days in the process, but Anson said that Merlot could be most affected by the changes, because of its greater susceptibility to heat.

She said the move was potentially a big cultural change. ‘It will be fascinating to track it.’

The new grapes would be allowed to constitute up to 10% of the final blend, but only 5% of a producer’s vineyard area. If final approval is given, plantings could begin in the 2020/21 season, said the Le Syndicat Viticole des AOC Bordeaux & Bordeaux Supérieur.

Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur make up 55% of Bordeaux’s vineyard area, producing 384 million bottles of wine per year, according to the union body for the appellations.


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