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Beat Kitchen Clutter Once and For All With These 9 Simple Tips

Beat Kitchen Clutter Once and For All With These 9 Simple Tips


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My husband and daughter love to browse in kitchen stores and regularly come home with “interesting” kitchen gadgets: a spaetzle maker, an apple corer, an egg poacher. If you have a large space with plenty of storage, that’s no problem. But if you are downsizing to a smaller home or trying to simplify your life, it may be time to rethink your stock. Read on for advice on how to let go of unnecessary culinary items so your kitchen — and you — gain a little breathing room.

1. Kitchen utensils. To scale back on this category, I recommend taking all of your spatulas, wooden spoons, measuring spoons and other utensils out from all of the storage areas. Group together items of the same or similar type. If you have duplicates, consider keeping only your favorite ones. You may want to toss broken or stained utensils. If you’re having trouble deciding which items to keep, reflect on your lifestyle goals, whether that involves a new practice of simplicity or fitting into a smaller home. Do you really need a separate cheese cutter, cake knife and apple slicer? Or will one basic utility knife suffice? Try not to hang on to items with only one function, unless you use them often. Also, let go of anything you have not used in several years.

2. Small kitchen appliances. Some small appliances can perform diverse functions, making other stand-alone appliances redundant. If you own a quality stand-up mixer, you may also be able to purchase attachments that can juice citrus, process food or make ice cream or pasta. Consider whether the initial expense for these attachments is worth the increased functionality and savings on storage space. Another idea for saving on storage space is to rethink appliances such as slow cookers and rice cookers. Although both appliances are useful, they take up real estate and the same function can be performed using pots and pans. Rice can be cooked in a saucepan with a tight-fitting lid, and a Dutch oven can be used to slow-cook food. (However, I would not recommend leaving a Dutch oven unattended all day.) There are other space-stealing appliances to consider unloading. A toaster oven can be replaced by a regular toaster and traditional oven. You can use a skillet instead of a grilled cheese maker, panini press and quesadilla maker. If you own a bread maker, consider how often you use it. Also, assess whether you need both a coffee maker and an espresso maker. Of course, if you use something often, keep it; otherwise, perhaps it is time to sell or donate it.

3. Everyday plates, mugs, glasses and flatware. To start, consider donating anything that does not match your set. This would include random mugs given to you as gifts, plastic cups with logos on them and any other mismatched items. I would also recommend tossing any plastic plates, bowls or cups for use by small children who are now long gone. These items might not be microwave-safe and often look worn and discolored over time. Now take a look at the pieces you have left. If you are downsizing or just simplifying, ask yourself the following questions. ○ How many people will be in your household? ○ Will you be doing any entertaining? ○ How many people can you reasonably fit in your new smaller (or existing) space for a dinner party or other gathering? If you’re downsizing and your new home is much smaller and you will not be entertaining large groups, think about reducing to six to eight place settings. That will give you enough to host an intimate dinner party. Do the same for cups, mugs and flatware. Before you get rid of anything, turn a discerning eye to the items you plan to keep. Discard chipped or cracked pieces, keeping only what is in good condition.

4. Pots and pans. At my house, we cook a fair amount, but we have limited the number of pots and pans we own. They tend to be bulky and take up a lot of storage space, and we simply don’t need that many. We have been able to get away with owning the following items. ○ One 8-quart Dutch oven ○ One 12-inch heavy frying pan with shared lid from the Dutch oven ○ One medium saucepan with lid ○ Two nonstick frying pans (8 inches and 12 inches wide) ○ One medium pot with lid (for boiling pasta and more) ○ One very large pot with lid (we’ve used for cooking crab and corn on the cob. We haven’t used it in a while, so I am thinking about getting rid of it.) Feel free to make your own list of must-have pots and pans. Try to think in terms of multitasking, eliminating items that have only one function.

5. Serving pieces. What type of entertaining, if any, will you being doing in your smaller (or simplified) home? Maybe in the past you hosted Thanksgiving dinners for many people, requiring numerous serving pieces. But perhaps you will be passing the torch to another family member or friend. Maybe your new home will fit only six to eight comfortably for dinner and you do not plan on hosting large cocktail parties or open houses. If you will be paring back your entertaining bandwidth, take a realistic look at your serving pieces. Multiple large platters, bowls, cake stands and appetizer plates may not fit into a smaller space and are good candidates for goodbye if you are simply cutting back your belongings. Think about keeping only medium or small pieces, prioritizing those that are multifunctional. For example, a large soup tureen has only one purpose and may not be something you want to store.

6. Fine china and crystal. The way we entertain has changed dramatically over the decades. In the ‘60s and ‘70s people like my parents were still hosting sit-down dinner parties. Using fine china, crystal and silver was common. Entertaining now is much more casual and relaxed. Still, deciding what to do with fine crystal, china and silver can be difficult, especially if you received your pieces as wedding gifts. I received 14 place settings of china and crystal glasses, as well as a full set of silver flatware. I have lovingly protected the china in earthquake-proof boxes in the closet under my stairs. I have all the crystal — wine, Champagne and water glasses — displayed in a china closet in my dining room. I have used them fewer than 10 times since my wedding over 25 years ago, but I can’t seem to part with them. I live in a large family home. But if I were downsizing, I might have to reconsider keeping these items. Related: Store Fine Dinnerware in a Shiny New China Cabinet If you rarely or never use your expensive dinnerware, try selling it at a home consignment store. If you simply can’t bear to part with all of it, consider keeping six place settings and storing them in your kitchen cabinets so you can use and enjoy them regularly.

7. Dishtowels, tablecloths and placemats. Take a look at your existing supply and think about getting rid of stained, faded or worn items. Unless you never use table linens, consider keeping only one tablecloth and one set of placemats. If you’re moving and it’s within your budget, you may want to treat yourself to a new tablecloth or placemat set. Purchasing a current color scheme is a relatively inexpensive way to add style to your new home. Dishtowels, too, are inexpensive to replace, so you might want to treat yourself to a fresh new set.

8. Baking supplies. Consider the kind of baking you will be doing. If you often baked cupcakes and cookies when your children were in elementary school but now never do, think about donating your cookie sheets and muffin pans. Do you take the time to bake layer cakes, or is a Bundt cake now more your style? What about specialty items like springform pans, pizza stones and shortbread molds? If you haven’t used these items in years, consider donating them or selling them at a local home consignment shop. As I mentioned earlier, a quality stand-up mixer is a nice item to keep, especially if you can purchase attachments for it that make other small appliances unnecessary. Related: Versatile Baker’s Racks to Store Your Supplies 9. Plastic and glass food storage containers. To pare these back, I recommend taking all containers and lids out from your cabinets and placing them on a counter. Match each container with its corresponding lid. If there are pieces left over with no mate, recycle them. Then assess the condition of the remaining containers. If they are chipped, cracked or stained, it’s time to let them go. Save your favorites, being sure you have several in each size. Then donate the rest.—By Jeanne Taylor


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy


13 Ways To Get Rid Of Paper Clutter

Maybe your wallet is overflowing with receipts. Maybe your desk drawers are crammed with wedding invitations and old Christmas cards. Or maybe you have piles of bank statements and bills shoved in the far corner of your kitchen counter.

Let’s face it: Paper clutter is one of the worst offenders. It accumulates quickly and can be totally overwhelming if you don’t deal with it on a daily basis.

But, thankfully, all it takes to banish paper clutter from your home are a few clever tricks and well-implemented organization systems.

Follow these 13 incredibly effective steps to organize, store, and get rid of your paper clutter for good.

MakeSpace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We'll get started with the right storage plan for you.

1. Go paperless with bank statements and bills

The first step to decluttering your paper is to stop all future paper items from entering your home.

Transfer everything online. Most banks and major utility companies offer the choice to stop receiving statements and notifications in the mail — all you have to do is ask.

To go a step further, skip the hand-written checks and pay your bills online instead. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t even know this is possible (online bill pay only accounts for 58% of consumer bills paid), but it is, and it’s genius.

An online bill pay system makes it easier to pay your bills on time and manage your budget. It also eliminates the need to stock up on envelopes and stamps. That’s a win-win.

2. Purge your paper

First, gather every bit of paper in your house. Don’t forget to check the junk drawers for crumpled take-out menus, instruction manuals, and neighborhood flyers.

Then, sort everything into three piles: Recycle, Scan, or Save.

Put important documents like tax returns, medical files, insurance papers, and leases into a pile to be scanned onto your computer for safekeeping. Save any special photos or sentimental cards you absolutely can’t bear to part with, then recycle everything else.

Free Bonus: Read these minimalist living tips to learn how to pare down your stuff and live with less.

3. Shred personal documents

Pixabay/Hans

Anything that has your personal information on it (like your address, social security number, phone number, or bank account number) should be shredded — not tossed out with the regular recycling.

Not only does a shredder help protect your privacy, but it also eliminates all paper that falls into the annoying “can’t throw it away, but don’t have a place to put it” category.

4. Recycle your stacks of magazines and newspapers

Flickr/Jessica Spengler

Let’s be honest: You’ll never read them again, nor will you need them for a future craft project or vision board (Pinterest has us covered).

While you’re at it, unsubscribe from all the magazines you’re no longer interested in.

Having a hard time getting rid of your stuff? Learn how to how to easily declutter your home like Marie Kondo, the most organized person in the world.

5. Create a filing system

The House on Hillbrook

There are so many different types of filing systems, but the best ones all have a few things in common: They’re logically organized, easy to access, and spacious enough to store new documents over time.

Consider your available space before you buy new filing equipment. If you have open desk drawers, metal file rails work great. If you have tons of closet space, go for portable file bins.

Prefer to keep your files in plain sight?

Next, stock up on file folders and separate everything into categories. Make sure you cover all the bases (Pet, Home, Medical, Creative, Work, Kids, etc.) and be as specific as possible with your labels.

Give big categories like “Finances” their own folders with additional files for specific types of documents like “Tax Returns” or “Bills.”

6. Put a recycling bag or bin near your front door

Flickr/Wicker Paradise

Before you even bring mail into the house, pause by your front door to toss everything you know you don’t need — like flyers, advertisements, coupons, and junk mail.

Then whenever you’re on the way out the door, grab the bag and dump your paper in the recycling bin.

7. Create a “Take Action” station for papers that need to be dealt with

The Inspired Room

Put all papers that require action on your part — RSVP cards to mail, forms to sign, letters to send — in one designated spot. You could hang papers on a giant kitchen message board, stack them in a mail organizer on your entryway table, or place them in a shallow tray on your desk. Whatever works best for you.

To prevent your station from turning into a dumping zone, make a daily or bi-weekly appointment with yourself to take care of the papers and clear the space.

8. Store coupons in a binder

Tiny Tips By Michelle

Coupons can be a major culprit of paper clutter. You find them, clip them with enthusiasm, then stash them in your junk drawer to expire and collect dust.

If your urge to be thrifty is interfering with your space and sanity, you need a better solution.

Binders. Or index card cases. Or any other middle school necessity. Just be sure to store the binder in your car or purse so you’ll actually use it when you go shopping.

9. Store important receipts in a binder, too

Honey We’re Home

Like coupons, receipts can be organized in a small binder.

Make sure you store the binder in a convenient place so you have no excuse not to add new receipts to it at the end of every week.

10. Use a calendar

Just A Girl and Her Blog

You don’t need to save event flyers or invitations if you have a calendar where you can record all your upcoming activities.

A digital calendar is ideal, but if you want to see your weekly schedule without having to unlock your phone, buy a desk or wall calendar.

Every time you get a new piece of paper that details an upcoming event, just transfer the information to your calendar and recycle the paper.

11. Hang photos, or put them in an album

A Beautiful Mess

Don’t let your precious memories sit in a box under the bed. If you have a bunch of printed photos hidden away, give them new life: Put them in an album, frame them, or hang them on a cork board so you can enjoy them every day.

12. Store your paper items in the right places

In My Own Style

The key to using and enjoying your stuff on a regular basis is to store it in a place that makes sense. Here are three simple and highly-effective ideas:

  1. Keep the paper items you use every day in plain sight. Put new magazines on your coffee table, stationery on your desk, and so on.
  2. Store sentimental items like cards, school papers, and souvenirs in pretty boxes or baskets to display on bookcases and shelves. You’re more likely to look through your mementos every now and then if they’re not tucked away in a closet.
  3. Keep all your craft and office-related paper goods (like extra printer paper, notebooks, and sticky notes) in the same area.

13. Store your paper items in MakeSpace

For everything you can’t fit in your home, like boxes full of extra wallpaper, old Valentine’s Day cards, and books you’ve already read (here’s how to decide what books to keep), let MakeSpace store everything for you.

Simply schedule a pickup and pack your stuff. We’ll pick up everything from your home, transport it to our secure, temperature-controlled storage facility, and create a convenient online photo catalog of your stuff.

Then when you want something back from storage, just log into your MakeSpace account, click the item’s photo, and we’ll deliver it straight to you.

This article was written by Paige Smith, a freelance writer from Orange County, California who specializes in lifestyle, wellness, and travel topics.

Related Articles

How to Prepare for an Outdoor Party in Less Than an Hour

6 Tips for Puppy Proofing Your Apartment

How to Integrate Smart Devices with Your Home

17 Winter Home Decor Items You’ll Love

Makespace is more than just storage.

To find out how you can make space in your life, talk to one of our space experts. We’ll get you started with the right storage plan for you.

Elbow Room

Tips, tricks, and endless ways to make more space in your life.

Storage without the struggle. Learn more

©2019 MAKESPACE LLC, NEW YORK, NY MakeSpace® is a registered trademark of MakeSpace LLC Terms Privacy



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