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Top Rated Wines for Gifting

Top Rated Wines for Gifting

7 bottles that are sure to please

When choosing a wine as a gift, there are many considerations that one can take into account.

Is the region famous enough? Did it have a great vintage?

Is the producer well known for producing great wine? Will people realize how much I spend when they see the name?

Does the package look fancy and expensive?

Another option is to simply to buy wines that over-perform. Wines that will make their recipients stop to look at the label when they taste the wine. Wines that make people say, “Wow that’s really good.”

That’s the tact I take when choosing wine gifts, and this list brings together some of my favorite wines for gifting today. These are wines that one can drink now or cellar, so you don’t have to worry when they’ll get opened. You’ll just have to be comfortable in knowing that when the corks are finally popped, you’re going to make some people very, very happy!

Click here for the Top Rated Wines for Gifting Slideshow.

— Gregory Dal Piaz, Snooth


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.


The 10 Best Wines for Mulled Wine This Spring

One of the greatest things about a stroll through Berlin is the market, heirloom trinkets, and delicious gluhwein. Germany is one of many countries that specializes in and adores mulled wine. In fact, it’s an Old World tradition we Americans should definitely subscribe to.

Related Guides

In short, mulled wine is warm wine hit with any number of spices, citrus, sweeteners, and sometimes even liqueur. There are no official rules, except to make something soothing (although we like this recipe). It’s like an off-season sangria, cozy and palate-coating as opposed to sprightly and refreshing.

But there is a trick to pulling off a tasty mulled wine. Yes, you can make something palatable out of the cheapest bottle of red at the corner store (and we won’t stop you from doing so). It can also be pretty reasonably argued that there’s no luxury mulled wine. Some devout fan will say otherwise, but nobody should be tossing cloves and orange peel at their aged Burgundy, let alone warming it up on the stove.

The key is to find the perfect bottle somewhere in between — a table wine you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own but also something that won’t make you wince as you pour it into a pan. You’ll end up with a refreshing mug of mulled wine and feel as though you’re parading through the streets of Munich in spring.