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Carol Grimaldi of Legendary Grimaldi's Pizza Has Died

Carol Grimaldi of Legendary Grimaldi's Pizza Has Died

Carol and her husband Patsy Grimaldi were behind one of the most legendary small pizza shops in New York City

Carol Grimaldi, matriarch of the beloved Grimaldi's Pizza, has died after a battle with cancer.

Carol Grimaldi, matriarch behind New York City pizza mainstay Grimaldi’s Pizza, died Thursday, April 10th, at the age of 75 after battling cancer. Grimaldi and her husband Patsy first opened Patsy’s Pizzeria in in 1990. Although the couple wanted to open their restaurant in Manhattan, they chose Brooklyn so they could legally make pizza in a coal oven. At the time, it was reportedly the city’s first coal-fired oven in 50 years.

The couple changed the name to Patsy Grimaldi’s in 1996, and retired in 1998 in order to travel. The restaurant, along with the naming and branding rights, was sold to Frank Ciolli. As Ciolli took over and expanded Grimaldi’s into an international brand, the quality once attributed to the local pizzeria was lost.

In 2012, after Ciolli moved his pizzeria to a new location and left behind the coal oven, the Grimaldis came out of retirement and returned to their original shop at 19 Old Fulton Street. The new restaurant, Juliana’s, was named after Patsy’s mother.

“Carol was a fixture near and dear to the many neighbors, frequent customers, and vendors of Grimaldi’s and was a driving force behind the creation of Juliana’s,” said a release from the restaurant.

Karen Lo is an assicate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


Tag Archives: Ignazio’s

If you’ve been waiting for Ignazio’s — the new pizza place in the old Bertucci’s — to open…

… you’ll have to wait a little longer.

The build-out is taking a while. Owner Louis Termini hopes for September.

Meanwhile, here’s the antipasto.

Termini — a Brooklyn native — says he opened the first oven-fired oven in the Hartford area, in 1990. Luna Pizza soon expanded to 7 locations in Hartford County.

He returned to his native borough when he found a great location underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.

There was one problem: It was around the corner from the legendary Grimaldi’s.

No problem! Ignazio’s — named after his father — has been a huge hit.

So Termini is not fazed by coming into a town that has more than its share of excellent Italian restaurants.

It’s a town he knows well. On drives between Brooklyn and Hartford, he stopped here often for lunch.

“I enjoy eating out,” he says. “I think I tried every place in Westport.”

Termini grew up on the water. In February he rented a house on Saugatuck Shores. He loved sitting in his grandmother’s rocking chair on the heated porch.

This summer, he’s enjoying it even more.

A realtor friend from the Bronx helped find the Bertucci’s site. “He’s Jewish, I’m Italian,” Termini says. “But we have the same childhood memories.”

There’s another New York connection: the Westport landlord knows the Brooklyn restaurant well. His sister lives around the corner from it.

Termini learned pizza-making from his mother and grandmother. He tweaked their recipes, so his pies are “a little different” than the standard neighborhood pizzerias of his youth.

He is proud of his fresh mozzarella. And he uses the same olive oils, cheeses, plum tomatoes and sauces he grew up with.

The doors are open. But Ignazio’s is still a few weeks away from welcoming customers.

Yet Termini is more than just a pizzeria owner. He’s also an artist. He got into the restaurant business after his first child was born — because, he says, of the type of artist he was: “starving.”

So he’s pleased to share Ignazio’s space with One River Art + Design. Shearwater — the popular Fairfield coffee bar, where Termini gets his java — will be there too.

Termini will offer both thin crust and Sicilian pizza from his wood-fired oven. Of course he’ll serve other dishes, like calzones — “and a few surprises we don’t have in Brooklyn.”

He’s discovered Connecticut Farm Fresh Express, which delivers produce. He’s looking for a good Connecticut beer to serve too.

Termini definitely knows the territory. The other day, he had dinner at the new Meatball Shop. He enjoyed it.

Of course, he notes, “there’s room for more than one meatball in town.”


New Pizza Place Rising In Old Bertucci’s

The build-out is taking a while. Owner Louis Termini hopes for September.

Meanwhile, here’s the antipasto.

Termini — a Brooklyn native — says he opened the first oven-fired oven in the Hartford area, in 1990. Luna Pizza soon expanded to 7 locations in Hartford County.

He returned to his native borough when he found a great location underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.

There was one problem: It was around the corner from the legendary Grimaldi’s.

No problem! Ignazio’s — named after his father — has been a huge hit.

So Termini is not fazed by coming into a town that has more than its share of excellent Italian restaurants.

It’s a town he knows well. On drives between Brooklyn and Hartford, he stopped here often for lunch.

“I enjoy eating out,” he says. “I think I tried every place in Westport.”

Termini grew up on the water. In February he rented a house on Saugatuck Shores. He loved sitting in his grandmother’s rocking chair on the heated porch.

This summer, he’s enjoying it even more.

A realtor friend from the Bronx helped find the Bertucci’s site. “He’s Jewish, I’m Italian,” Termini says. “But we have the same childhood memories.”

There’s another New York connection: the Westport landlord knows the Brooklyn restaurant well. His sister lives around the corner from it.

Termini learned pizza-making from his mother and grandmother. He tweaked their recipes, so his pies are “a little different” than the standard neighborhood pizzerias of his youth.

He is proud of his fresh mozzarella. And he uses the same olive oils, cheeses, plum tomatoes and sauces he grew up with.

The doors are open. But Ignazio’s is still a few weeks away from welcoming customers.

Yet Termini is more than just a pizzeria owner. He’s also an artist. He got into the restaurant business after his first child was born — because, he says, of the type of artist he was: “starving.”

So he’s pleased to share Ignazio’s space with One River Art + Design. Shearwater — the popular Fairfield coffee bar, where Termini gets his java — will be there too.

Termini will offer both thin crust and Sicilian pizza from his wood-fired oven. Of course he’ll serve other dishes, like calzones — “and a few surprises we don’t have in Brooklyn.”

He’s discovered Connecticut Farm Fresh Express, which delivers produce. He’s looking for a good Connecticut beer to serve too.

Termini definitely knows the territory. The other day, he had dinner at the new Meatball Shop. He enjoyed it.

Of course, he notes, “there’s room for more than one meatball in town.”


5 Things to Do With Kids At Brooklyn Bridge Park

Brooklyn Bridge Park is hands down one of our family’s favorite New York City spots. I love being close to water, I know you’re tired hearing me say that I’m an island girl at heart but it’s the truth. There are few other places in this city that offer such a variety of fun for the entire family. The park lies beneath the Brooklyn bridge with Manhattan Bridge in the background. It’s very scenic with gorgeous views of Manhattan’s skyline and the East River. More importantly, there are a ton of things to do with kids at Brooklyn Bridge Park which always makes it a wonderful experience for our little family. I wanted to share 5 of our favorite things to do and maybe on this beautiful summer Sunday, my family will head out there.

[Tweet 𔄝 things to do with kids at Brooklyn Bridge #NYCkids”]

1. Jane’s Carousel


Janes Carousel is hands down the most beautiful carousel we’ve been on to date. If you follow us on social media, you know by now that we are borderline obsessed with this carousel.

The carousel itself is beautiful but what really makes its beauty stand out is its location along the East River.

It’s so bright, beautiful and inexpensive you can’t help but feel like you’ve cheated paying only per ride. Maybe it’s the times I’ve taken my kids to the carousel but I’ve never experienced long lines which I find interesting about this epic carousel.

2. Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory

So this ice cream shop itself isn’t anything to call home about,nothing fancy but the ice cream is the amazing. that’s until you try their ice cream. Our family’s favorite is the Chocolate Chocolate flavor which you can find melting down my kids arms on a hot summer day. There are only a few seats inside but with so much beauty in the park, we always find a nice spot outside to enjoy our treats with a view.

If you have small children they will probably be excited about watching so much water traffic. It’s a good teaching opportunity to talk to them about different types boats and what they’re used for. Watching boats at Brooklyn Bridge Park is probably what excites my kids more than anything else.

4. Playgrounds

There are two really awesome playgrounds here at Brooklyn Bridge Park. One mainly for smaller kids and babies and the boat shaped one for older kids. Both playgrounds are really fun and in great condition and there are always plenty kids and friendly parents to socialize with.

Whether you’re visiting or live in New York City it’s worth knowing that Brooklyn Bridge Park is home to one of the legendary Grimaldi’s pizza. In all of the years, we’ve been going to this park (even before we had kids) the only time that there wasn’t a really long line at Grimaldi’s was when it was closed. Locals and tourists love the pizza here and they have no problem waiting for it. Since the line is always so long, we’ve done it about twice but it was well worth the wait. While you wait you’d notice that it’s customary to buy a pizza and head to the lawn with your blanket.

Oh my gosh! Look at how tiny The Princess Fairy was here.

She loved Jane’s Carousel since she was a baby.


You know that I never end one of these posts without telling you the things that real moms really need to know. There are bathrooms at the park, they are not stroller friendly and isn’t horrible. If you’re potty training your kid, I’ll recommend you walk with seat covers. If you’re visiting on a hot summer day want to take into consideration that there isn’t much shade from the sun at Brooklyn Bridge Park so make sure you take some steps to protect your children skin from the sun. Here are some suggestions.

What’s your favorite thing to do with kids at Brooklyn Bridge Park?

Born and raised on the gorgeous island of Grenada. Adanna’s sunny and creative spirit shines through her unique storytelling and photography. Adanna takes the mystery out of parenting in New York City by sharing her secrets to raising kids in the concrete jungle. Her readers come back often for her unique DIYs, parenting tips, style, delicious recipes and life hacks.


Overrated & Underrated Pop Culture Exhibit

Overrated Pop Culture Exhibit: Discovery Times Square

Underrated Pop Culture Exhibit: The SNL Exhibit

I constantly see adds for Discovery Times Square and always feel like I want to go. I finally made it and was a little disappointed. It was insanely crowded with little room to move. Also, as a local, I try to avoid Times Square like the plague. I saw The Hunger Games exhibit and was less than impressed. Try the SNL exhibit instead. It walks you through how the show is made in a week. I don’t actually watch SNL, but have seen the iconic scenes on YouTube. Even as an outsider to the cult phenomenon, I enjoyed every second of the exhibit and could recognize most of the characters.


Carol Grimaldi of Legendary Grimaldi's Pizza Has Died - Recipes

DINNER TIME BROOKLYN STYLE!
This place is gold! Queuing up outside was half the fun. Sitting down and getting that massive New York pizza in front of us was just wow! The offspring of the legendary Grimaldi pizza in Brooklyn ( which strangely is next door comparing queue sizes) is a joy to eat at. Great service, great atmosphere, even better pizza. Worth the wait!

853 - 857 of 3,119 reviews

Seriously you could not make it up that an hour before this restaurant opened on a sunny Sunday afternoon the queue was three deep. I think it was this that gave me the highest expectations as I was expecting the best pizza in the whole wide world . It was good but not that good . Once the doors opened within minutes it was full . One pizza is enough for two. The starters were nice , again share , even the salad is huge. The tables were way to close for my liking, clearly they are trying to fit in as many people as possible . It was obvious the place was full of tourists . Would I go again , probably not on a hurry , it's nice to see and open kitchen and all the pizzas being hand made fresh , it has a buzz because it's full , I am just not sure I would stand in a queue for so long just for a good pizza, I would for a brilliant one of which I have had a few in my time in many places in the world including Italy itself . So in summary go if you can just walk in and be seated, don't expect the absolute best and you will be ok .

TripAdvisor brought me to Juliana's and the experience was great. Very nice restaurant located near the Brooklyn ice cream factory just next to the shore and the Brooklyn Bridge. Staff was very welcoming and professional. We only waited 10 min for a table. Pizzas are delicious and portions are huge. A large pizza that you can share as long as drinks would cost around 30 bucks. We really enjoyed our time there. I highly recommend to eat there if you're visiting the neighborhood

We only had time for one pizza stop, and we chose Julianna's over Grimaldi's based on recent reviews. I would definitely like to make it back sometime to compare to Grimaldi's, but it's hard to imagine anything much better. Fresh ingredients, very clean interior and bathrooms, exceptional service, and decent value. Good beer on tap, and we walked right in to a relatively sparse crowd at 5pm on a Monday. I am sure it gets much more crowded later in the evening. No problem recommending this place for a great pizza. Salads and especially the meatballs also looked great.

I visited NYC back in August 2016 and was keen but the line was long and decided to pass.

Came back in May 2017 and did the whole queuing up and getting excited and had expectations. Bad move on my part.

I suggest you drop all your expectations before you order and eat here.

It was average at best. Service was good but it doesn't suddenly make the pizza taste amazing.

I think this place is over-hyped, I'm sure there are better ones out there.


New Pizza Place Rising In Old Bertucci’s

If you’ve been waiting for Ignazio’s — the new pizza place in the old Bertucci’s — to open…

… you’ll have to wait a little longer.

The build-out is taking a while. Owner Louis Termini hopes for September.

Meanwhile, here’s the antipasto.

Termini — a Brooklyn native — says he opened the first oven-fired oven in the Hartford area, in 1990. Luna Pizza soon expanded to 7 locations in Hartford County.

He returned to his native borough when he found a great location underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.

There was one problem: It was around the corner from the legendary Grimaldi’s.

No problem! Ignazio’s — named after his father — has been a huge hit.

So Termini is not fazed by coming into a town that has more than its share of excellent Italian restaurants.

It’s a town he knows well. On drives between Brooklyn and Hartford, he stopped here often for lunch.

“I enjoy eating out,” he says. “I think I tried every place in Westport.”

Termini grew up on the water. In February he rented a house on Saugatuck Shores. He loved sitting in his grandmother’s rocking chair on the heated porch.

This summer, he’s enjoying it even more.

A realtor friend from the Bronx helped find the Bertucci’s site. “He’s Jewish, I’m Italian,” Termini says. “But we have the same childhood memories.”

There’s another New York connection: the Westport landlord knows the Brooklyn restaurant well. His sister lives around the corner from it.

Termini learned pizza-making from his mother and grandmother. He tweaked their recipes, so his pies are “a little different” than the standard neighborhood pizzerias of his youth.

He is proud of his fresh mozzarella. And he uses the same olive oils, cheeses, plum tomatoes and sauces he grew up with.

The doors are open. But Ignazio’s is still a few weeks away from welcoming customers.

Yet Termini is more than just a pizzeria owner. He’s also an artist. He got into the restaurant business after his first child was born — because, he says, of the type of artist he was: “starving.”

So he’s pleased to share Ignazio’s space with One River Art + Design. Shearwater — the popular Fairfield coffee bar, where Termini gets his java — will be there too.

Termini will offer both thin crust and Sicilian pizza from his wood-fired oven. Of course he’ll serve other dishes, like calzones — “and a few surprises we don’t have in Brooklyn.”

He’s discovered Connecticut Farm Fresh Express, which delivers produce. He’s looking for a good Connecticut beer to serve too.

Termini definitely knows the territory. The other day, he had dinner at the new Meatball Shop. He enjoyed it.

Of course, he notes, “there’s room for more than one meatball in town.”


Tag Archives: One River Art + Design

The COVID vaccine is now available in Connecticut for people 75 or older. They (or someone helping them) can sign up online (click here). After registration, they’ll get an email detailing next steps.

There may be an initial delay in scheduling, but access should grow quickly soon.

More than 100 healthcare providers statewide will offer the vaccine. More locations and a map of them will be available in coming weeks.

The scheduling link also contains a list of frequently asked questions about the vaccine.

People without internet access, or who need help, can call 877-918-2224 weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Brendan Murphy’s works are drawing raves at his one-man show at the POP’TArt gallery downtown.

In return, the fast-rising contemporary artist asked curator Jennifer Haviland how he could support Westport. She chose an organization she loves: Wakeman Town Farm.

Murphy chose one of his 8-layer silver-based chrome heart sculptures, and offered it for auction. Measuring 24 x 24 x 8 inches, it’s valued at $18,000.

The heart is on display with Murphy’s show, 󈭐% Stardust” at POP’Tart (1 Main Street).

Auction co-chair Nicole Gerber says, “Wakeman Town Farm has a rich history in Westport, and resides at the heart of our community. The Farm is committed to inspiring local residents through sustainable practices, education opportunities, and community service. In this crucial time in our history, The Farm is actively supporting local organizations focused on alleviating food insecurity in our area. We are honored to support a nonprofit that allows the people it serves to serve others as well.”

Bidding starts at $5,000, by email: [email protected] For more information on the auction, click here. For more information about Brendan Murphy, click here.

The Westport Parks and Recreation Department invites you to participate in a socially distanced “scavenger hunt”, hosted by the Goosechase App!

Who doesn’t love a scavenger hunt?

Westport’s Parks & Recreation Department is organizing one, for families or teams.

Registrants first download the GooseChase app on their phones, search for the “Westport Winter Goose Chase,” then click here to receive a game password.

Winners get a gift basket of items from Westport businesses. For more information, click here.

One River — the art and design school — is sponsoring a downtown show. The opening next Sunday (January 24, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.).

David Waldman and BTS Realty donated their storefronts: 33 Elm Street, Brooks Corner and Sconset Square. Two hundred works — from children to adults — will be on view through February 7.

Also included: One River’s high school portfolio development class, with traditional and digital works.

It’s official: Most high school winter sports can begin tryouts and practices this Tuesday (January 19). Basketball, ice hockey, swimming, gymnastics and indoor track got the go-ahead yesterday from the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference.

Games may begin February 8, except for track which cannot compete until March. The number of games is limited there will be no state tournaments, though a “post-season experience” can be held (similar to fall sports).

In addition, athletes will be required to wear masks during competitions. Coaches and players will also have to wear masks and be socially distanced on the sidelines. Officials are required to wear masks at all times.

There will be no wrestling or competitive cheer, however. The state Department of Public Health categorized those as “high-risk activities.”

Football — a fall sport — had hoped to play a shortened late winter/early spring season. However, the CIAC canceled that option yesterday.

And finally … happy 87th birthday to the brilliant mezzo-soprano, Marilyn Horne!


The ultimate movie-night menu, from spiced popcorn to DIY pizzas

Remotes at the ready! These action-packed courses are perfect for a night in Credit: Helen Cathcart

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W e’re getting into cosy-night-in territory now, and whether that means sitting down with the family to devour a box set (Succession is my current obsession), or gathering mates to watch A Star Is Born, it calls for a menu that can be prepped ahead, leaving you free to concentrate on the action.

The spiced popcorn I've shared below is the perfect snack to kick things off. A simple pizza dough, meanwhile, provides a versatile base for DIY toppings. Baby potatoes with rosemary and garlic is one of my all-time favourites (don’t knock the carb-on-carb combo until you’ve tried it), and the salami version is based on one I had at the legendary Grimaldi’s in Brooklyn.

The dough freezes really well so make more than you need and whack a couple of balls in the freezer for your next night in.

And because I believe that homemade ice cream is for everyone (not just those with fancy machines), here’s a no-churn recipe. Another great thing to have in the freezer, though it won’t last long…


Exciting New Project Is “Write Here” In Westport

The Westport Library attracts plenty of writers.

And not just in the stacks, or for book talks.

It’s a wonderful place for anyone — published author, budding writer, wannabe — of any age to sit and create.

Choose your spot: the big tables in the Forum, one of the smaller community rooms, a bench on the Riverwalk.

There are other places in Westport to write, of course. The Senior Center and Westport Writers’ Workshop offer classes. The Saugatuck Story Lab is a welcoming space too.

But Jan Bassin believes our town pulses with places that can inspire words. To jump-start those muses, she’s teamed up with the library to offer a month-long community writing project.

Every day during August, Bassin — Senior Center coordinator of writing programs, and the library’s Maker-in-Residence — will host an hour-long write-in.

Every day, it will be at a different spot.

The Playhouse. Compo Beach. The Farmers’ Market. The boardwalk at National Hall. Longshore. The train station.

You name it — if it’s in Westport you’ll find Bassin, and writers of every age and ability, all month long.

Each “Write Here” (get it?) session begins with a brief introduction from a representative of that location. Bassin will provide a prompt. Writers will then free-write: prose, poetry, first-person, creative, whatever. At the end, anyone who wants to can share their creations.

“The act of writing connects us to ourselves and our community,” Bassin says. “When you write somewhere, you feel connected to that spot.”

One example: At Wakeman Town Farm, the prompt might spur one person to write about her memories of growing up on a farm. Someone else might react to the sights and smells of WTF itself. A third person might be inspired to create a poem about animals.

Scenes like this could inspire some great writing.

The project kicks off this Thursday (August 1, 12 noon, Westport Library). I’ve been known to write a few stories about �,” so I’ll join Jan Bassin to talk briefly about writing in Westport.

Then we’ll turn it over to you all, for your own words.

Every “Write Here” session is free. You can come to as many or as few as you want. You can read your writing aloud, or keep it private.

“Write Here” will evolve, Bassin expects. She may create a website for writers who want their words to live on (by name, or anonymously).

You might even be inspired to submit a “Write Here” story to �.”

You know: this blog, right here.

(For more information about “Write Here: Westport,” click here.)


Watch the video: Grimaldis Has The #1 Ranked Best NY Pizza in Vegas? (November 2021).