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Vincent Marotta, the Co-Founder of Mr. Coffee, Has Died at 91

Vincent Marotta, the Co-Founder of Mr. Coffee, Has Died at 91


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A year after launching the Mr. Coffee brand, Marotta convinced Joe DiMaggio to be the company spokesman

Vincent Marotta and his business partner Samuel Glazer founded Mr. Coffee in 1972.

Vincent Marotta, one of the founders of the iconic brand Mr. Coffee, whose moniker has been found in American households and college dorm rooms for decades, has died at the age of 91.

Marotta, along with his high school friend Samuel Glazer, developed the brand after consulting with former Westinghouse engineers to design a restaurant-style drip-brewing system.

In 1973, Marotta successfully convinced legendary career Yankee Joe DiMaggio to appear as a spokesman for the brand.

“I rang Joe DiMaggio up on a Saturday morning,” Marotta told NPR in 2005, explaining how he convinced The Yankee Clipper to take the gig. “It was about 11 a.m.; I shall never forget this.

He answered the phone and I told him who I was, and of course, he said, `What's the name of that product?' And I said, ‘Mr. Coffee. You haven't heard of it, Mr. DiMaggio, ‘cause it's brand-new.’ And he said, ‘Well, I have heard of it.’ He said, ‘Yes, I was playing in a golf tournament last week. I won one as a prize.’”

In 1987, Marotta and Glazer sold their company, North American Systems Inc., which manufactured Mr. Coffee machines, for an estimated $182 million.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Big fat clue in bold

Case report describes benefit of ketamine in child with PTSD
Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna C. Donoghue, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues report on a case of a 7-year-old boy treated with ketamine for PTSD and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation. The episodes involved destruction of property and the symptoms were refractory to multiple medical and behavioral interventions.
The authors note that the child demonstrated sustained remission from symptoms (eight to 13 days) when exposed to ketamine on two occasions: when he underwent surgery for tonsillectomy and when he underwent sedated magnetic resonance imaging. On both occasions the patient demonstrated a reduction in the intensity and frequency of aggressive behaviors and exhibited an ability to control his emotions.
"There is a growing literature supporting ketamine for treatment-resistant depression in adults and, more recently, PTSD," the authors write. "This case report suggests the need for future study using ketamine as a treatment option for children with a history of trauma and severe behavioral dysregulation who have not responded to first-line medication and behavioral therapy approaches."

Yes, well, psychotropic medications and behavioral therapy do not address sepsis in any way. But Ketamine does.
This is infection. Period. No emotional trauma required.
A hundred dollars says that kid had multiple rounds of antibiotics before that surgery.
And if they let it go on. he will end up with narcolepsy. Hell, it's probably too late already.

Puffy droopy cheeks on that boy too.


Watch the video: Founders Stories: SAVOs John Aiello - Part 1 (May 2022).


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