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Beyond Ketchup: 10 Condiments You Need to Know About (Slideshow)

Beyond Ketchup: 10 Condiments You Need to Know About (Slideshow)

Ever heard of Gentlemen’s Relish?

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

Achaar is a family of pickled fruits and vegetables popular in India, chopped into small pieces and cooked in oil and brine with lots of salt, turmeric, and other spices. They vary from region to region, but are usually made from mango and lime, and can also contain cauliflower, carrot, tomato, onion, and eggplant. It can be eaten as-is or served alongside just about any Indian dish; you can order it online at PickleMasti.

Achaar

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

Achaar is a family of pickled fruits and vegetables popular in India, chopped into small pieces and cooked in oil and brine with lots of salt, turmeric, and other spices. It can be eaten as-is or served alongside just about any Indian dish; you can order it online at PickleMasti.

Sambal

Editorial/Thinkstock

This Indonesian condiment is made primarily with chili peppers; other ingredients can include fish sauce, garlic, shallot, ginger, lime juice, sugar, and vinegar. It pairs perfectly with fried chicken and grilled or fried fish. Sambal oelek, a popular variation, is commonly used in cooking, and is a great way to spice up sauces, soups, and marinades. Dean & Deluca sells it online.

HP Sauce

No English pantry is complete without some HP Sauce, and it’s a tragedy that it hasn’t caught on more in America. A “brown sauce” produced by Heinz and first introduced in 1895, it’s an umami-rich condiment made with malt vinegar, tamarind, tomatoes, dates, sugar, and spices. It pairs with everything from meat pies to fries to steak, and can also kick up soups and stews. It’s available at most major supermarkets nowadays, but HP Sauce (and its many variations) can be purchased at BritSuperstore.com.

Gentleman’s Relish

Another British mainstay, Gentleman’s Relish is a pungent anchovy paste also known as Patum Peperium. Invented in 1821, it’s strong, salty, and slightly fishy, with 60 percent anchovies and the rest butter, herbs, and spices. The full recipe is a well-kept secret, but it pairs well with everything from baked potatoes to scrambled eggs and cottage pies, and can also be simply spread on buttered toast. This most English of condiments can also be purchased on BritSuperstore.com, along with its salmon- and mackerel-based cousins.

Ajika

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

Popular in Russia, Ukraine, and other parts of the Caucasus including Georgia, ajika is a spicy sauce made with red peppers and other ingredients that vary regionally, including garlic, dill, and walnuts. Several different varieties can be purchased at RussianProducts.com.

Tkemali

Another major Georgian condiment, tkemali’s primary ingredient is sour plums. It’s pungent and tart, and is typically also made with garlic, dill, chili peppers, cilantro, and mint. It’s essentially the Georgian ketchup, and pairs well with grilled meats. It can also be purchased at RussianProducts.com.

Gochujang

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

This pungent paste is one of Korea’s most popular condiments, and is traditionally made with red chiles, glutinous rice, fermented soybeans, and salt. It adds an umami and sweet and spicy pick to anything it comes in contact with; it’s most commonly used in rice dishes like bibimbap as well as soups, stews, and marinades, and goes great with a grilled steak. It can be found online at CrazyKoreanShopping.com.

Mostarda

This popular Italian condiment, typically associated with Christmas, has quite a unique flavor; it’s typically made with made with candied fruit and mustard oil, giving it a sweet, complex flavor. There are regional variations all over Italy, but it’s traditionally served with meats and the traditional stew known as bollito misto. Nowadays, it’s becoming more well-known as a great accompaniment to cheese. A well-known variety is available at iGourmet.com.

Salmoriglio

This Southern Italian condiment is made by combining lemon juice, olive oil, minced garlic, parsley, oregano, and salt and pepper, and is a perfect, bright and zingy accompaniment to grilled and roasted meats and seafood. We recommend you make your own; here’s a great recipe.

Zacuscă

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

This spread is incredibly popular in Romania and other parts of the Balkans, and is catching on with vegetarians worldwide. It’s traditionally made with roasted eggplant or sautéed and chopped raw onions, tomatoes, and roasted red peppers, but some variations include carrots, celery, and mushrooms. It’s a popular breakfast condiment, simply spread on bread, but it can also be tossed with pasta or used in many other dishes. It’s not produced by any American companies, but you can make your own or buy some homemade zacuscă on Etsy.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


10 Kitchen Items You Need to Toss Immediately

Start the new year right with a good old-fashioned purge.

What better way to start the new year than by clearing out the clutter in your kitchen? Old food, unused gadgets, and abandoned Tupperware lids are all getting in the way of making this hardworking room the most efficient space possible. And by minimizing the number of unnecessary items, you&rsquoll maxmize the use of everything in your kitchen, while also freeing up some much-needed storage space. Here&rsquos your checklist on where to start.

It seems like they&rsquoll last forever, but most spices lose their flavor after a while&mdashand the last thing you want when you've made the effort to cook is bland food. McCormick has a helpful guide to how long you can keep certain spices. Basics like whole salt and peppercorns can last several years, but dried herbs are pretty much flavorless after two. If you can&rsquot remember when you bought your spices, it&rsquos probably time to replace them.

If you can&rsquot recognize the blobby thing that&rsquos frosted over, it&rsquos probably safe to eat, but it won&rsquot taste as good anymore&mdashor worse, it could have that dreaded freezer burn. Blech! So it&rsquos best to chuck it, unless you have a really compelling reason for hanging onto not-awesome-tasting food.

To maximize the time you can maintain frozen food, make sure you cool and freeze it properly in the first place. If you freeze foods a lot, consider buying a vacuum sealer for reusable freezer bags. And still, cook them within six months for ideal flavor.

Ketchup and mustard are typically good for about a year after opening&mdashbut only if you&rsquove kept them consistently refrigerated. This slideshow from Delish walks you through other basic condiments, like mayonnaise and barbecue sauce, and when you should throw them out.

As with spices, canned food won&rsquot last till the world ends. In general, most cans can be stored up to five years, but only up to 18 months if they contain something highly acidic, like tomato sauce. Expiration dates can be confusing, so check out this helpful explainer. However, if you have any dented cans or ones that have grown a weird bump, toss them immediately because they could be at risk for botulism.

By now, you know that old dish and scouring sponges harbor a ton of germs. If you can reuse them another way (not on your dishes), do so.

But if you can&rsquot, toss them and select new ones made from biodegradable cellulose or organic loofah, or use other eco-conscious alternatives. Cut-up old towels work for most dirty dishes and can be laundered a bamboo or other biodegradable brush can scrub off tougher, stuck-on foods.

It must be accepted: You are never going to use up those little packets of duck sauce from the Chinese place, so you might as well toss them. One alternative: You can empty such sauces into individual glass containers, because seeing a jar of it in your fridge may remind you to use it up. Same goes for the plastic utensils that came with your food.

While you're making changes, get into the habit of asking for utensils not to be added the next time you order takeout. After all, you&rsquore taking the food home, so you can use your own forks and spoons, which will probably work better than flimsy plastic ones anyway. It&rsquoll be better for your kitchen and better for the environment in the long term.

You&rsquove probably heard the horror stories of people who have died or became violently ill after eating pancakes made from expired mixes (because they were allergic to the mold inside them), but the reality is a little less scary. Yes, mold spores can develop in a pancake mix if it&rsquos in an opened container that's been exposed to humidity, which could encourage mold growth. If it&rsquos past the expiration date, you should definitely throw that out! However, if it&rsquos been in a sealed, unopened container and kept in a dry, cool cupboard, it&rsquos unlikely that mold could&rsquove gotten in there or had a chance to proliferate, so you can keep that.

Yes, they last a long time&mdashthe squirrels who bury them for the winter are counting on that&mdashbut if they are shelled or if they&rsquove been in an open container, they will go rancid after six to nine months (some faster than others). So be sure to nosh on them sooner than later, and throw them out if you don&rsquot.

We&rsquore not recommending you add to the landfills already brimming with plastic refuse. But if your containers are scratched, cloudy, stained, or deformed, or if you&rsquove microwaved them a million times, then they&rsquore likely not safe for food anymore. If they don&rsquot have matching lids, they&rsquore also not very useful for leftovers. Recycle the containers you can. For those that are no longer safe for food but are otherwise in good shape, repurpose them to corral all of your odds and ends, like bathroom toiletries, first aid supplies, batteries, pens, etc.


Watch the video: The Geography of Spices and Herbs (December 2021).